Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management – Reuters poll

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

FILE PHOTO: A woman wearing a protective face mask uses an escalator in a quiet business district on the first working day after the Golden Week holiday, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan, May 7,2020.REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Read More
Read More

Japan firms fall woefully short of meeting government goals on women in management: Reuters poll

By Tetsushi Kajimoto

TOKYO (Reuters) – About one-fifth of Japanese companies have no female managers and most say women account for less than 10% of management, a Reuters monthly poll found, highlighting the struggle for the government’s “womenomics” drive to make headway.

The survey results come as Japan is seen to delay its target this year to raise the share of women in leadership posts to 30% as part of the government’s campaign to empower women, dubbed “womenomics”, and cope with Japan’s ageing population.

The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Sept. 29-Oct. 8, found 71% of Japanese firms said women accounted for less than 10% of management, while 17% had no female managers at all.

Asked how much scope there was to increase female managers, 55% said by around 10%, a quarter said by about 20%, one in 10 firms said by around 30%, while 5% saw no room for that.

Read More
Read More

Recap and analysis of the week in Florida government and politics

Dara Kam
 |  News Service of Florida

TALLAHASSEE — Florida’s election system suffered yet another black eye this week, after the state’s online voter-registration system repeatedly crashed before Monday’s deadline to sign up for the November presidential election.

The Sunshine State’s seemingly perpetual election-related snafus are the subject of ridicule, scorn and embarrassment, and a federal judge on Friday excoriated state officials for this week’s meltdown.

“Every man who has stepped foot on the moon launched from the Kennedy Space Center, in Florida. Yet Florida has failed to figure out how to run an election properly — a task simpler than rocket science,” Chief U.S. District Judge Mark Walker wrote in a 29-page order issued early Friday morning.

Secretary of State Laurel Lee extended the registration deadline until 7 p.m. Tuesday, after tens of thousands of users were unable to submit voter-registration applications through the online system in the hours

Read More
Read More

Annabelle Southcoat, Government Scientist, On The Positive Power Of Champions In The Workplace

In honor of #WorldMentalHealthDay I’d like to share with a story from another inspirational woman in my network. Annabelle Southcoat is a genuine polymath – someone whose intellectual curiosity and drive for humanity and social justice has led her down so many fruitful paths already. Her story is interesting because she so nearly wasn’t. Her story is relevant to business leaders because she demonstrates the value of authentic adjustments to our inclusion practice and how, with the right champion, we can change the course and direction of lives. Ms Southcoat is now a Psychologist at the UK Defence, Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) a drummer in a band, an innovative thinker and a pussy cat mother.

The Significance Of Childhood Narratives

In Ms Southcoat’s own words. ”I’m also a dyslexic, gay, trans woman (though I tend to just say woman these days) and

Read More
Read More

The Capital Letter: Stimulus Politics, Trade Deficits, Big Government & Big Tech

(James Lawler Duggan/Reuters)

The politics of stimulus, trade deficits, big government and big tech and more.

Call me crazy, but I’m not convinced that the latest round of talks on a new stimulus package are going as well as they might be.

Bloomberg:

President Donald Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi questioned each other’s mental faculties, showcasing increasing partisan tensions as Election Day looms.

“The president is, shall we say, in an altered state right now, so I don’t know how to answer for his behavior.,” Pelosi said in an interview on Bloomberg Television Thursday.

The Democratic leader also called Trump’s changing positions this week on whether to let his administration conduct talks on fiscal stimulus “strange.” Trump pulled his team from negotiations Tuesday, prompting Pelosi to suggest to colleagues that day that Trump’s thinking might have been affected by the steroids he’s taken to battle his Covid-19,

Read More
Read More

Australian science and technology sectors talk of ‘revival’ as Federal Government splashes the cash in Budget

It was 2013 and the Coalition, under the leadership of Tony Abbott, had just taken power.

The new prime minister unveiled his cabinet, what he called one of the most experienced in Australian history.

But one portfolio was missing.

For the first time since 1931, there was no minister for science.

The CSIRO, and the country’s climate science body was significantly watered down.

A year later, the science portfolio would be reinstated, but for many in the science community, the damage was done.

Fast forward to today and it’s a different story: the Morrison Government is winning widespread praise from the science and technology sectors.

As soon as the Budget landed this week the praise started flowing from science bodies across the country.

The Budget would spur a “research revival”, according to Science & Technology Australia, Australia’s peak body for science and tech industries.

It said it was a “shot

Read More
Read More

Why the Government Should Get Comfortable with Technology Escrow for Classified IP

The federal government has been using technology escrow to safeguard their commercial off-the-shelf software for decades, but agencies appear hesitant to use this same protection for classified software and other technology.

Technology escrow is a service that mitigates the risk of technology acquisition. With an escrow contract, software source code or other IP from the developer is placed in a secure escrow account held by an escrow agent—a trusted independent third party. If in the future, the developer is no longer able to support the product for reasons specified in the escrow agreement—such as bankruptcy, obsolescence, merger or acquisition—the technology buyer will still have access to the source code, IP, and other “know how” to keep their mission-critical applications and systems up and running. 

Any technical data package can be protected with a technology escrow agreement. If escrow will be required, the government entity should make this requirement known in

Read More
Read More

Iranian government admission shows Trump right and Biden wrong on student visas | American Enterprise Institute

The Trump administration’s efforts to restrict student visas from countries designated as state sponsors of terrorism might seem like common sense, but, like everything else in an election year, it has become fodder for the partisan meatgrinder. Late last month, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement published a rule change to end indefinite visas for enrolled students originating in countries where visitors often violated the terms of their visas, or countries that are state sponsors of terrorism. None of this, of course, would end the issuance of visas; rather, certain students would have to re-apply after two or four years.

Joe Biden has generally opposed any new controls on foreign students. “Across the world, people come to this country with unrelenting optimism and determination toward the future. They study here, innovate here, they make America who we are. Donald Trump doesn’t get that — we need a president who does,” Biden

Read More
Read More

US seizes Iranian government domains masked as legitimate news outlets

US law enforcement has seized 92 domains used to spread propaganda and fake news by Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC). 

The Department of Justice (DoJ) said on Wednesday that the IRGC has used the domains to “unlawfully engage in a global disinformation campaign.”

Four of the domains were used to create news outlets that appeared legitimate but the flow of ‘news’ articles and contents hosted by the websites were controlled by the IRGC. 

See also: Black Hat: When penetration testing earns you a felony arrest record

In particular, US audiences were targeted with Iranian propaganda “to influence United States domestic and foreign policy in violation of the Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA),” the DoJ claims.

Google tipped off US law enforcement to the global campaign, and then with the help of the tech giant, Twitter, Facebook, and the FBI, 92 domains were confiscated on October 7.

screenshot-2020-10-08-at-08-31-12.png

Under the US

Read More
Read More

U.S. government scrutinizes Microsoft’s hiring practices as tech giant looks to boost diversity

Microsoft’s headquarters in Redmond, Wash. (GeekWire Photo / Monica Nickelsburg)

Microsoft in June announced a sweeping racial justice plan, including an initiative to spend $150 million on diversity and inclusion programs, and double its number of Black and African American managers and senior employees by 2025 in the U.S.

Now the United States Department of Labor Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) is taking a closer look at the company’s hiring and whether it constitutes unlawful discrimination on the basis of race.

“We have every confidence that Microsoft’s diversity initiative complies fully with all U.S. employment laws,” Dev Stahlkopf, corporate vice president and general counsel at Microsoft, wrote in a blog post published Tuesday. “We look forward to providing the OFCCP with this information and, if necessary, defending our approach.”

The OFCCP asks Microsoft to “prove that the actions we are taking to improve opportunities are not illegal race-based

Read More
Read More