GSA Wants to Know What Tech to Include on New Small Business GWAC: Polaris

The General Services Administration has big ideas for its new governmentwide small business IT contract but wants to know exactly what kinds of emerging technologies people want to see among the offerings.

GSA is developing Polaris as the spiritual successor to $15 billion Alliant 2 Small Business, which the agency abruptly canceled in July after years of protests, re-awards and more protests. At the time, officials said a replacement contract vehicle was coming, though they provided few details.

The first look at the new contract, dubbed Polaris, came in late August, followed by some early industry outreach.

“Polaris is also known as ‘The Guiding Star’ in the night sky,” Laura Stanton, assistant commissioner for the Office of Information Technology Category, wrote in a recent blog post. “Polaris will not only guide small businesses through the federal market, it will also help GSA customer agencies through the acquisition of IT service-based

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GOP lawmaker: Democrats’ tech proposals will include ‘non-starters for conservatives’

Buck said he opposes not-yet-unveiled Democratic proposals aimed at “eliminating arbitration clauses and further opening companies up to class action lawsuits.” And he said he rejects antitrust subcommittee Chair David Cicilline’s (D-R.I.) idea of advancing legislation to force structural breakups of major online platforms like Amazon.

“We agree that antitrust enforcement agencies need additional resources and tools to provide proper oversight,” Buck wrote. “However, these potential changes need not be dramatic to be effective.”

The Republican recommendations mark the first major findings to surface out of the Judiciary Committee’s probe. Though the subcommittee’s final report has yet to be released, Democrats have floated sweeping changes such as legislation to force structural separations for tech platforms similar to Glass-Steagall, the Depression-era law that split investment and retail banking.

In the memo, Buck wrote that the majority’s incoming report “offers a chilling look into how Apple, Amazon, Google, and Facebook have used

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After bubble experiment, NHL league wants to include virtual ads

Curtis McElhinney #35 of the Tampa Bay Lightning hoists the Stanley Cup overhead after the Tampa Bay Lightning defeated the Dallas Stars 2-0 in Game Six of the NHL Stanley Cup Final to win the best of seven game series 4-2 at Rogers Place on September 28, 2020 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Dave Sandford | National Hockey League | Getty Images

It wasn’t easy and most likely will result in hundreds of millions in losses due to Covid-19. Still, the National Hockey League completed its bubble experiment and crowned a champion on Monday.

The NHL awarded its famous Lord Stanley’s Cup to the Tampa Bay Lightning after a six-game series with the Dallas Stars. The ratings were down from last year’s Boston Bruins-St. Louis Blues series, but viewership aside, league executive Keith Wachtel told CNBC the NHL is positioned to generate additional revenue after its bubble play.

Wachtel, the NHL’s

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Xiaomi’s new India products include a speaker, a soap dispenser, and shoes

Xiaomi has announced a wide range of new products for India under the tagline “smarter living,” further pushing the devices in its ecosystem beyond smartphones. Some of them have already gone on sale in China in altered form, but they’re all new for India.

First up is the Mi Watch Revolve, which looks very similar to a product sold in China as the Mi Watch Color, which was itself almost identical to the Amazfit GTR. The Revolve has a 1.39-inch round OLED screen with 326 ppi, and Xiaomi is claiming up to a week’s battery life.

It’s not clear what software the Revolve is running, but in screenshots it looks similar to what ships on Amazfit watches like the T-rex, and it certainly isn’t Wear OS. Amazfit is part of Xiaomi’s ecosystem, so it’d make sense for software to be shared at least to some extent.

The Mi Watch Revolve

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After 40 Years, Updated Pain Definition Aims To Include Those Once Left Out

It’s not uncommon for people with chronic pain but no clear injury to deal with doubting physicians.

Katie Clark, a retired middle school English Language Arts teacher in Michigan with fibromyalgia, said she has been lucky with her doctors. Fibromyalgia causes chronic pain that doctors think arises from amplified pain signals in the brain and spinal cord.

“I’ve been fortunate to have doctors that mostly believe the pain I feel is real,” she said. But even then, “They don’t fully understand that it affects you emotionally, physically, your energy level, your ability to think straight. That is difficult to communicate to doctors.”

In the past, healthcare providers have ascribed to a narrow definition of pain, viewing

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Amazon’s new products include flying security camera for your home, virtual assistant for kids

Amazon released its latest lineup of connected hardware at a virtual event on Thursday, and also took the opportunity to address ongoing privacy concerns about its Alexa virtual assistant.

A new command, “Alexa, delete everything I ever said,” will wipe clean a person’s history of queries made to Alexa. Users can also turn on a new setting that will make sure Alexa deletes everything people say as they go.

The updated privacy features come after concerns were raised last year about Amazon’s practice of listening to and recording some anonymous queries to help improve Alexa’s performance. There was, however, an option for users to opt out of sharing their voice clips with Amazon.

“It’s a balancing act for Amazon between monetizing its golden customer base and heightened privacy issues as the regulatory spotlight on big tech gets brighter,” said Daniel Ives, managing director of equity research at Wedbush Securities.

If

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