Governments are using the pandemic as an excuse to restrict internet freedom

The news: Global internet freedom has declined for the 10th year in a row as governments use the coronavirus pandemic as cover to restrict people’s rights, according to a report by the think tank Freedom House. Its researchers assessed 65 countries, accounting for 87% of internet users worldwide. The report covers the period from June 2019 to May 2020, but some key changes took place when the pandemic struck.  

The pandemic effect: In at least 20 countries, the pandemic was cited as a reason to introduce sweeping new restrictions on speech and arrest online critics. In 28, governments blocked websites or forced outlets, users, or platforms to censor information in order to suppress critical reporting, unfavorable health statistics, or other content related to the coronavirus. In at least 45 of the countries studied, people were arrested as a result of their online posts about covid-19.

Many countries are also conducting

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An Emerging Internet Giant in China

Pinduoduo Inc. (NASDAQ: PDD) is turning out to be the second most successful e-commerce channel in China. Through its advanced and integrated business model, it has outperformed many of its competitors in a noisy and over-crowded industry. In terms of number of orders and consumers, Pinduoduo is the second largest internet giant in China, according to a detailed analysis by Turner Novak.

Pinduoduo was founded initially back in 2015 as Pinhaohuo (PHH). The initial business model of PHH was buying fruits in bulk from farmers and selling them directly to the consumers using online channel. Pinhaohuo, since a newly established entity did not have its own website or application, used the group chats platform of Tencent’s popular Wechat – often referred to as the Facebook of China. Since a huge chunk of people were using it, it proved a jump-off point for Pinhaohuo’s growth.

06photo/Shutterstock.com

Initially, it got fame and

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Washington state’s broadband guru on an internet moonshot and being a metaphorical prom king

Russ Elliott in his man-cave COVID-19 workspace. (Photo courtesy of Russ Elliott)

When a buddy of Russ Elliott‘s asked if he’d join him in starting a telecom company, he flat out said no. While his friend had been a great help building a website he needed, the venture didn’t have any financial backing and Elliott wasn’t versed in internet connectivity.

But when his friend took the unusual step of sending him a motivational postcard — something with an iceberg and a corny message about not knowing what’s out there unless you took a risk — it played on his mind. Elliott had an MBA. He had drive. He decided to embrace the inspirational cliché.

With that, some 20 years ago Elliott helped launch what became a successful business in Colorado called Brainstorm Internet, serving as its president for 13 years.

“We were nimble and quick and had smart people on

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Virus Forces Europe to Confront Its Creaking Internet Problems

(Bloomberg) — Shortly after coronavirus forced Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte to lock down the country, lawmaker Massimiliano Capitanio took an unusual call at his office in Rome.

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It was an appeal for help from a hospital at the epicenter of the outbreak in northern Italy. Its administrators direly needed faster internet connections and computers to deal with the flood of patients. Capitanio — who sits on parliament’s telecommunications committee — called the country’s phone companies to help out.

To Capitanio, the pandemic was a wake-up call to fix Italy’s creaking internet. Now Conte has stepped in with a plan to kick-start investment by merging the country’s two biggest landline networks.

“Some families still don’t own a computer,” said Capitanio. “The government has been forced to step in and tackle this social emergency.”

Europe’s internet infrastructure is riddled with gaps and bottlenecks, exposed over the past seven months

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T-Mobile is expanding its rural home internet service to 450 more areas

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T-Mobile is bringing its LTE home internet service to more people.


Angela Lang/CNET

T-Mobile has announced an expansion of its Home Internet pilot to 450 more areas, which it says covers 20 million households. The service uses T-Mobile’s 4G LTE network, and was launched as an invite-only pilot in rural areas in March last year, with the carrier saying it’s now opening the service to non-T-Mobile customers.

T-Mobile’s home internet service is $50 per month, with a $0 hardware lease and no data caps.  

“We’re understanding this massive expansion … at a time when our connection to the Internet is so vital — for work, remote school, connection with family and friends,” said T-Mobile CEO Mike Sievert.

You can see a list of the new cities

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After a string of delays, SpaceX launches 13th batch of Starlink internet satellites

Shrugging off a Falcon 9 launch abort last week and a scrub Monday, SpaceX fired 60 more Starlink internet satellites into orbit Tuesday, the thirteenth batch in a fast-growing global network of broadband relay stations. The rocket’s first stage, making its third flight, flew itself to an on-target landing on an offshore drone ship after lifting the upper stage out of the lower atmosphere, chalking up the company’s 61st successful booster recovery.

Michael Seeley, co-founder of We Report Space, posted a stunning photo of the rocket launch silhouetted by the sun.

The launch ended a frustrating stretch of delays dating back to mid September that included back-to-back Falcon 9 launch aborts last Thursday and Friday that grounded the Starlinks and a Space Force

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A simple $50 accessory can double the internet speed on your computer or gaming console



a man using a laptop computer sitting on top of a table: How To Speed Up Home Internet


© Provided by BGR
How To Speed Up Home Internet

  • Anyone wondering how to speed up your home internet without dropping a ton of cash on an overpriced mesh Wi-Fi system will be happy to hear that it’s much easier and less expensive than you think.
  • If you’re sick of slow internet speeds and “buffering” on your computer, TV, or video game console, there’s a simple device that will be a game-changer for you.
  • Before you do something drastic like buying a new router or a pricey mesh Wi-Fi system, check out the TP-Link AV1000 Gigabit Powerline Internet Kit, which is just $49.99 on Amazon.

When you’re trying to watch a video or stream a game, slow internet speeds and buffering can be your worst nightmare. It’s so aggravating, but it happens all the time. What you might not realize though, is that there’s a wonderfully easy way for

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Internet Protocol Camera Market – Actionable Research on COVID-19|Growing Adoption of Smart Homes to Boost the Market Growth

The global internet protocol camera market size is poised to grow by USD 8.47 billion during 2020-2024, progressing at a CAGR of over 14% throughout the forecast period, according to the latest report by Technavio. The report offers an up-to-date analysis regarding the current market scenario, latest trends and drivers, and the overall market environment. The report also provides the market impact and new opportunities created due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Download a Free Sample of REPORT with COVID-19 Crisis and Recovery Analysis.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201005005618/en/

Technavio has announced its latest market research report titled Global Internet Protocol (IP) Camera Market 2020-2024 (Graphic: Business Wire)

The growing adoption of smart homes will be a significant factor in driving the growth of the IP camera market. The increasing number of thefts and burglaries in various countries has boosted the demand for security solutions,

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Ad Tech Could Be the Next Internet Bubble

Or, as Hwang puts it: “The whole edifice of online advertising is, in short, bunk.”

These problems aren’t entirely new, of course. Hwang cites an adage attributed to the 19th-century businessman John Wanamaker: “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is, I don’t know which half.” But Wanamaker was grappling only with the problem of attribution—figuring out whether the money he spent on a newspaper ad, say, drove sales that otherwise wouldn’t have happened. Today’s programmatic advertising has that issue in spades, plus the extensive problems of placement and fraud. At least Wanamaker could check that his ads had actually appeared in the newspaper.

Had the biggest ad agencies of the analog age—companies like Oglivy or WPP—gone belly-up in the 1980s, the fallout would have been limited to Madison Avenue. Now the central players are Facebook and Google, with Amazon racing to join them. Those three

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The Quantum Internet Will Blow Your Mind. Here’s What It Will Look Like

This article appeared in the November 2020 issue of Discover magazine as “The Quest for a Quantum Internet.” Subscribe for more stories like these.


Call it the quantum Garden of Eden. Fifty or so miles east of New York City, on the campus of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Eden Figueroa is one of the world’s pioneering gardeners planting the seeds of a quantum internet. Capable of sending enormous amounts of data over vast distances, it would work not just faster than the current internet but faster than the speed of light — instantaneously, in fact, like the teleportation of Mr. Spock and Captain Kirk in Star Trek.

Sitting in Brookhaven’s light-filled cafeteria, his shoulder-length black hair fighting to free itself from the clutches of a ponytail, Figueroa — a Mexico native who is an associate professor at Stony Brook University — tries to explain how it will work. He grabs

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