The Atlantic hurricane season isn’t over yet

But it’s 2020, and the Atlantic may have other ideas. A weather pattern that encourages air masses to rise, leading to increased showers and thunderstorms, looks likely to overspread the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean by late in the month into early November. This pattern change could once again raise the odds of tropical development, provided other air and ocean ingredients are present as well.

In a typical storm season, the Atlantic averages one named storm after Oct. 19, which would suggest that even in an average year we wouldn’t be quite done yet. However, this season is anything but typical, considering we are pacing more than a month ahead of the busiest season on record, which occurred in 2005, and have dipped into the Greek alphabet for only the second time.

It’s plausible that the Atlantic basin may cap off its hyperactive season with a robust final act.

Near-term

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Tech Isn’t The Answer To Your Work-From-Home Culture

Ashish Kachru is Co-Founder and CEO of Altruista Health, developer of the industry’s leading care management and population health platform.

There’s a lot of buzz about what the workplace will look like once the pandemic is over. I believe we are in a great sifting process in the economy in which weak companies will fail and good companies have a chance to become great. It may surprise you that, even as the CEO of a technology company, I don’t think technology will drive the successes.

A recent McKinsey & Company study says we are headed for a future that mixes remote work arrangements with office-based work. However, the more I read and talk with employees at my company, the more convinced I am that employers are about to overlook one huge threat that comes with a heavily emerging work-from-home environment. Relying too much on technology in a work-from-home

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Tim Cook Gave This Simple Reason Why Being a $2 Trillion Company Isn’t Apple’s Most Important Thing

Tim Cook was a guest at The Atlantic Festival, where he sat for a virtual interview with Editor-in-Chief, Jeffrey Goldberg. During their conversation Cook talked about everything from climate change, to how Apple is handling the pandemic, both from the perspective of working remotely, as well as what the company is doing to help.

It was at the end of the interview, however, when things shifted to something more personal. Goldberg asked Cook first about whether he had plans to leave (he says he doesn’t), and then what impact Apple’s $2 trillion market cap had on the company (it sits at just under that as of today’s date).

We’ll get to Cook’s response in a moment, because I think it says a lot about Apple and what has long drawn its most loyal fans to the company. That’s an important thing right now as the company has faced criticism over

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California’s mandate to sell only zero-emissions vehicles by 2035 isn’t as crazy as critics think

Last week, California Governor Gavin Newson leaned over the hood of a Ford Mustang Mach-E and signed an executive order saying that all new passenger cars and trucks sold in the state must be emission-free by 2035.



a toaster oven sitting on top of a car: A detail view is seen of an Hyundai Kona Electric Highlander ahead of the Electric Vehicle Show 2019 at Sydney Olympic Park on October 25, 2019 in Sydney, Australia. Electric vehicles are being bought in greater numbers in Australia, with 2017 seeing a 67% increase in sales from the previous year. The largest EV test ride event will be open to public on October 26 and 27th. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)


© Mark Kolbe/Getty Images
A detail view is seen of an Hyundai Kona Electric Highlander ahead of the Electric Vehicle Show 2019 at Sydney Olympic Park on October 25, 2019 in Sydney, Australia. Electric vehicles are being bought in greater numbers in Australia, with 2017 seeing a 67% increase in sales from the previous year. The largest EV test ride event will be open to public on October 26 and 27th. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

The new mandate doesn’t necessarily mean that California car dealers would, literally, sell nothing but fully electric or hydrogen-powered vehicles 15 years from now, several experts say.

That is the goal, though. And it’s not entirely

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Tech Isn’t the Answer for Test Taking

Dear readers, please be extra careful online on Friday. The news that President Trump has tested positive for the coronavirus created the kind of fast-moving information environment in which we might be inclined to read and share false or emotionally manipulative material online. It’s happening already.

I found this from The Verge and this from The Washington Post to be helpful guides to avoid contributing to online confusion, unhelpful arguments and false information. A good rule of thumb: If you have a strong emotional reaction to something, step away from your screen.

Technology is not more fair or more capable than people. Sometimes we shouldn’t use it at all.

That’s the message from Meredith Broussard, a computer scientist, artificial intelligence researcher and professor in data journalism at New York University.

We discussed the recent explosion of schools relying on technology to monitor remote students taking tests. Broussard told

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The tech crisis that isn’t: China controls the world’s rare earth supply chains

senkaku-islands-by-al-jazeera-english-1.jpg

Photo of a Japanese Coast Guard vessel patrolling Uotsuri Island by Al Jazeera English, licensed under Creative Commons 2.0.

They’re called either the Diaoyu Archipelago or the Senkaku Islands — eight rocks just a few miles wide, if that, situated about 125 miles southwest of Okinawa. They’re uninhabited, and generally so strategically unimportant that during negotiations for the Treaty of San Francisco in 1951 that established Japan’s territorial borders, diplomats forgot to mention them. They remained “occupied” by the US until 1972. Today, Japan claims them, but so does China and so does Taiwan. From a distance, they look like the tops of old furniture floating just above the waterline after a flood.

Submerged reefs make for wonderful fishing. During the first week of September 2010, several unlicensed Chinese trawlers were spotted operating in what Japan calls the Senkaku. Depending on who tells the story, there may have been as

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Venus isn’t habitable — and it could be all Jupiter’s fault

As a result of Jupiter — the largest planet in our solar system — moving closer and then away from the sun in its early formation, the planet’s vast gravitational pull effectively killed off Venus’ potentially Earth-like environment, the authors of a study published in the Planetary Science Journal found.
Venus is the second closest planet to the sun, and now has a surface temperature of about 880 degrees Fahrenheit (471 degrees Celsius) — above the melting point of lead, according to NASA. This is hotter than Mercury, despite Mercury being closer to the sun.

Researchers from the University of California, Riverside (UCR) said that Jupiter’s movement likely accelerated Venus’ fate as an inhospitable planet.

“As Jupiter migrated, Venus would have gone through dramatic changes in climate, heating up then cooling off and increasingly losing its water into the atmosphere,” said Stephen Kane, UCR astrobiologist, in a statement Wednesday.

“One

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Switch’s Free Jump Rope Game Isn’t Leaving The eShop Anymore [Update]

Update: Nintendo’s free Switch fitness game, Jump Rope Challenge, was originally slated to be delisted from the Switch eShop on September 30, but that’s no longer the case. As announced on Twitter, the game will now remain available to download “until further notice.”

The original story follows.

Earlier this year, Nintendo released a small fitness game on the Switch eShop called Jump Rope Challenge–a free app that keeps track of how many times you virtually jump rope. If you’ve yet to download it, however, your time to do so is quickly running out, as the game will only be available on the digital storefront until the end of this month.

As the company previously announced, Jump Rope Challenge is being removed from the eShop this Wednesday, September 30. It’s unclear if it will be offered again in the future, so if you’re interested in grabbing it, you should do so

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Mayo’s Chief Digital Officer: The hospital of the future isn’t just about technology

Technologists conjure up images of the hospital of the future as a network of connected devices, automated systems and virtual visits. While all these innovations are important, Rita Khan said planning for the future of healthcare should go beyond technology alone.

“I think there are a lot of opportunities to step back and not just think about interesting technologies that can be applied,” she said at MedCity INVEST’s virtual conference. “I think care delivery itself will change significantly over the next 10 years.”

Khan was named Mayo Clinic’s first chief digital officer in December. Though Mayo Clinic was no slouch when it comes to technology, Khan was tasked with building solutions that lead to a better consumer experience.

For instance, she’s interested in remote patient monitoring and remote diagnostics. But more broadly, she sees an important opportunity to improve the patient experience and take a more holistic look at care,

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