Water has become a big issue for Big Tech. But Microsoft has a plan

When Brian Janous started at Microsoft in 2011 as a data center utility architect, he joined at a time when energy and sustainability issues were still nascent.

“I was the first person that was brought into the organization to work on energy and sustainability issues. This was back in the time when it … certainly wasn’t clear to me why a company like Microsoft even needed someone like me,” Janous told CNBC by phone.

“And the person that was hiring me, (said), ‘I really think this whole cloud thing is going to be a big deal. And I think energy is going to be really important to the future of our company.’ And he was clearly correct. Obviously, over the last several years, as the cloud has really exploded, energy and our environmental footprints have become increasingly important issues,” he added.

The U.S. government estimated that data centers in the

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SpaceX’s next astronaut mission for NASA has been pushed to November following an issue with its rocket engines



Shannon Walker, Victor J. Glover, Soichi Noguchi that are standing in the snow: From left: mission specialist Shannon Walker, pilot Victor Glover, Crew Dragon commander Michael Hopkins, and mission specialist Soichi Noguchi at SpaceX headquarters in Hawthorne, California, on September 24, 2020. SpaceX


© SpaceX
From left: mission specialist Shannon Walker, pilot Victor Glover, Crew Dragon commander Michael Hopkins, and mission specialist Soichi Noguchi at SpaceX headquarters in Hawthorne, California, on September 24, 2020. SpaceX

  • NASA’s next mission with SpaceX will launch “no sooner than early-to-mid November,” the agency announced Saturday.
  • That mission, called Crew-1, will ferry four astronauts to the International Space Station and back.
  • The launch was previously slated for Halloween. The delay allows SpaceX to investigate an issue with its Falcon 9 rocket engines.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

NASA’s four-astronaut team will have to wait a little longer to visit the International Space Station. The agency announced Saturday that Crew-1, its joint mission with SpaceX, won’t take off until at least early-to-mid November.

The mission was previously scheduled for 2:40 a.m. ET on October 31. The latest delay allows SpaceX to evaluate an with its Falcon 9

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SpaceX rocket issue delays astronaut launch

Astronauts make round trip to space station from U.S. soil

NASA astronaut Douglas Hurley (C) waves to onlookers as he boards a plane at Naval Air Station Pensacola to return him and NASA astronaut Robert Behnken home to Houston a few hours after the duo landed in their SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour spacecraft off the coast of Pensacola, Fla,, on August 2, 2020. Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA | License Photo

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NASA delays commercial crew mission to study Falcon 9 engine issue

WASHINGTON — NASA is delaying the launch of the first operational SpaceX commercial crew mission to the first half of November to provide more time to review a problem during a recent Falcon 9 launch attempt.

NASA announced Oct. 10 the Crew-1 mission, which was scheduled to launch on a Falcon 9 in the early morning hours of Oct. 31 from the Kennedy Space Center, will now launch no earlier than early to mid-November.

The delay, the agency said, will provide more time for SpaceX “to complete hardware testing and data reviews as the company evaluates off-nominal behavior of Falcon 9 first stage engine gas generators observed during a recent non-NASA mission launch attempt.” NASA did not identify the specific launch attempt in question, but an Oct. 2 launch of a Falcon 9 carrying a GPS 3 satellite was scrubbed just two seconds before liftoff because of SpaceX Chief Executive

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Bar or restaurant? The big issue in pandemic-struck Brussels

BRUSSELS (AP) — New coronavirus restrictions have put a spotlight on two Belgian classics this week: Beer and surrealism.

Since bars in Brussels were forced to close Thursday for at least a month to deal with a massive surge in virus cases but restaurants were allowed to remain open, the big question on the streets is: when is a bar a bar and when is a bar a restaurant? And more importantly, does the distinction really help contain the pandemic?

It is all very reminiscent of surrealism master Rene Magritte, who painted a picture of a pipe and wrote under it “Ceci n’est pas une pipe (This is not a pipe),” — because, of course, it is an image of a pipe.


“The Treachery of Images,” as the painting is called, also applies to Brussels watering holes these days. To stay open, bars will have to prove that they are

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Harris makes Trump’s taxes an issue during debate

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisOvernight Defense: Top military officers quarantine after positive COVID case | Distracted pilot, tech issues led to F-35 crash It matters: Kamala Harris and the VP debate CDC director says it’s safe for Pence to take part in debate MORE (D-Calif.) raised the issue of President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump and Biden’s plans would both add to the debt, analysis finds Trump says he will back specific relief measures hours after halting talks Trump lashes out at FDA over vaccine guidelines MORE‘s tax returns during Wednesday’s vice presidential debate, in an effort to contrast Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump and Biden’s plans would both add to the debt, analysis finds Trump says he will back specific relief measures hours after halting talks Chance the Rapper, Demi Lovato to play digital concert to encourage voting MORE with Trump on the issue of transparency.

When

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Grindr fixes issue that let hackers easily hijack accounts

Illustration for article titled Serious Grindr Vulnerability Let Hackers Hijack User Accounts With Just an Email Address

Photo: Leon Neal (Getty Images)

The popular LGBT+ hook-up app Grindr has fixed a glaring security flaw that allowed hackers to take over any account if they knew the user’s registered email address, TechCrunch reports.

Wassime Bouimadaghene, a French security researcher, originally uncovered the vulnerability in September. But after he shared his discovery with Grindr and was met with radio silence, he decided to team up with Australian security expert Troy Hunt, a regional director at Microsoft and the creator of the world’s largest database of stolen usernames and passwords, Have I Been Pwned?, to draw attention to an issue that put Grindr’s more than 3 million daily active users at risk.

Hunt shared these findings with the outlet and on his website Friday, explaining that the problem stemmed from Grindr’s process for letting users reset their passwords. Like many social media sites,

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Twitter vows to fix bias image cropping issue

twitter-logo-app.jpg

Image: Brett Jordan

Twitter has pledged that it will continually test its algorithms for bias and give users more choice in how images appear on its platform.

“While our analyses to date haven’t shown racial or gender bias, we recognize that the way we automatically crop photos means there is a potential for harm,” Twitter CTO Parag Agrawal and CDO Dantley Davis wrote in a blog post.

“We should’ve done a better job of anticipating this possibility when we were first designing and building this product.

“We are currently conducting additional analysis to add further rigor to our testing, are committed to sharing our findings, and are exploring ways to open-source our analysis so that others can help keep us accountable.”

See also: What is bias in AI really, and why can’t AI neutralize it?

The pair added that Twitter would decrease its reliance on using machine learning for

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210 scientists highlight state of plants and fungi in Plants, People, Planet special issue

210 scientists highlight state of plants and fungi in Plants, People, Planet special issue
Five broad themes that encompass the State of the World’s Plants and Fungi report 2020 are featured in this stylised illustration. (a) Resources for exploring plant and fungal properties; (b) The influence of global biodiversity policy; (c) Unlocking the useful properties of plants and fungi; (d) UK and UK Overseas Territories; (e) New insights into global knowledge of plants and fungi. Credit: Plants, People, Planet

The Special Issue, ‘Protecting and sustainably using the world’s plants and fungi’, brings together the research—from 210 scientists across 42 countries—behind the 2020 State of the World’s Plants and Fungi report, also released today by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.


This is the first time that over 200 scientists have come together and collaborated to deliver a vital update, not only on the status of the world’s plant life, but also the world’s fungi. Humanity’s existence and well-being depends on plants and fungi—from our food

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