Japan’s Sony and Kioxia seeking U.S. approval to supply to Huawei – Nikkei

FILE PHOTO: A Huawei company logo is pictured at the Shenzhen International Airport in Shenzhen, Guangdong province, China, July 22, 2019. REUTERS/Aly Song/File Photo

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s Sony Corp and memory chipmaker Kioxia Holdings Corp have applied for U.S. approval to continue supplying Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, Nikkei reported on Sunday.

If confirmed, the move follows other tech companies such as Intel Corp that recently received licences from U.S. authorities.

With U.S.-China ties at their worst in decades, Washington has been pushing governments around to world to squeeze out Huawei, arguing that the telecoms giant would transfer data to the Chinese government for espionage.

Huawei is one of the top customers for Sony’s image sensors for smartphones. Kioxia Holdings Corp is the world’s No. 2 maker of flash memory chips and a Huawei supplier.

Nikkei here said without U.S. licenses, Sony and Kioxia would face risk to their earnings.

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Japan’s Sony and Kioxia seeking U.S. approval to supply to Huawei: Nikkei

FILE PHOTO: The Huawei logo is seen at the IFA consumer technology fair, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Berlin, Germany September 3, 2020. REUTERS/Michele Tantussi/File Photo

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s Sony Corp and memory chipmaker Kioxia Holdings Corp have applied for U.S. approval to continue supplying Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, Nikkei reported on Sunday.

If confirmed, the move follows other tech companies such as Intel Corp that recently received licences from U.S. authorities.

With U.S.-China ties at their worst in decades, Washington has been pushing governments around to world to squeeze out Huawei, arguing that the telecoms giant would transfer data to the Chinese government for espionage.

Huawei is one of the top customers for Sony’s image sensors for smartphones. Kioxia Holdings Corp is the world’s No. 2 maker of flash memory chips and a Huawei supplier.

Nikkei here said without U.S. licenses, Sony and Kioxia would face

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Japan’s iQPS to update technology for future radar satellites

SAN FRANCISCO – Like many of its western counterparts, Japan’s Institute for Q-shu Pioneers of Space (iQPS) has ambitious plans for its Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) constellation.

By 2025, iQPS plans to operate a 36-satellite constellation to gather data and imagery with a resolution of one meter “of almost any point in the world within 10 minutes and to conduct fixed-point observations of particular areas once every 10 minutes,” iQPS spokeswoman Yuki Ariyoshi told SpaceNews by email. With that resolution, customers can obtain frequent imagery of land and buildings in addition  to observing moving objects like livestock, vehicles and vessels, she added.

IQPS launched its first 100-kilogram SAR satellite, Izanagi, in November 2019 on an Indian Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle. The firm’s second satellite, Izanami, is scheduled to launch as early as December on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket as part of Spaceflight’s SXRS-3 rideshare mission.

The key technology iQPS

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Japan’s asteroid sample-return spacecraft Hayabusa2 gets extended mission

The Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa2 is currently making its round-trip return from an asteroid, bringing pieces of the space rock back to Earth. But instead of ending its run with that cosmic delivery, after dropping off its precious parcel, the spacecraft will swing back out into space to visit another rocky destination.

After Hayabusa2 delivers its samples of asteroid Ryugu to Earth in December, the craft will head off toward a new asteroid target: 1998 KY26, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) said in a statement. The spacecraft should reach the new asteroid in 2031.

Hayabusa2 reached asteroid Ryugu in June 2018 and spent over a year studying the space rock. The spacecraft left Ryugu in November 2019 and its sample-return capsule will return pieces of the asteroid to Earth with a Dec. 6 landing in the Australian Outback. 

Hayabusa2’s first mission aimed to help scientists learn about the composition of

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Japan’s NTT to Spend $38B to Buy Out, Take DoCoMo Private | Business News

By ELAINE KURTENBACH, AP Business Writer

MITO, Japan (AP) — Japanese telecoms giant Nippon Telegraph & Telephone, or NTT, announced Tuesday it will spend 4.3 trillion yen ($38 billion) to buy out and take private its mobile unit NTT DoCoMo in one of the largest ever deals of its kind.

NTT and NTT DoCoMo executives released details of the plan Tuesday.

The move is intended to enhance the competitiveness of the NTT group as it consolidates its services, said NTT’s CEO Jun Sawada.

“We want to be a game changer,” Sawada said.

He said that between Sept. 30-Nov. 16 the company would buy DoCoMo’s shares at a price of 3,900 yen. DoCoMo’s shares were last trading at 3,213 yen. NTT held about 66% of DoCoMo’s shares as of March 31.

The acquisition will be financed by bridge loans, not a share offering, the company said.

The restructuring dovetails with newly

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Japan’s NTT to spend $38B to buy out, take DoCoMo private

Updated

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Are You Ready To See Mars In Ultra HD 8K? Japan’s Plans To Take ‘Super Hi-Vision’ Cameras To Space

Japan is going to Mars—and it’s taking an incredibly detailed video camera with it. 

A joint venture between the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Japan’s state broadcaster NHK—which pioneered HD and Ultra HD TV technology and broadcasting—will jointly develop a “Super Hi-Vision Camera” capable of filming both 4K and 8K images for JAXA to take to Mars.

JAXA has history here; its Kaguya (Selene) lunar orbiter in 2008 produced the first high-definition HD video ever seen of the Moon.

It’s also helped produce 4K filming from the International Space Station (ISS). 

Its new camera will go to Mars in 2024 as part of JAXA’s Martian Moons eXploration mission. It will be the first time that 8K Ultra HD images of Mars and its moons are taken in proximity. 

What

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