NASA drops joyful Jupiter flyover video from Juno’s perspective

Take a moment to bask in the beauty of a Jupiter flyover.


NASA/Kevin Gill; video screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET

No Earth roller coaster could possibly compare to a 130,000 mph (209,000 kph) flyover of Jupiter. That’s what NASA’s Juno spacecraft experienced in June with a close pass of the gas giant. 

A striking new NASA video re-creates the scenery from this thrilling space adventure.

Citizen Scientist Kevin Gill, who also works as a software engineer at NASA, harnessed data from Juno’s JunoCam, the camera that’s been delivering lavish views of Jupiter since the spacecraft arrived at the planet in 2016.

“The sequence combines 41 JunoCam still images digitally projected onto a sphere, with a virtual ‘camera’ providing views of Jupiter from different angles as the spacecraft speeds by,” said NASA in a statement on Thursday.

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Jupiter Killed Earth-Like Environment On Hellish Planet

KEY POINTS

  • Jupiter’s early gravitational pull may have killed Venus’ habitable surrounding
  • Venus has extreme temperatures that can kill any form of life
  • The case on Venus serves as a warning for Earth to avoid a similar temperature rise

Venus would have been capable of hosting life similar to Earth if not only for Jupiter’s interference in its planetary motion. The planet, named after the Roman goddess of love and beauty, was thrown off by the largest planet in our solar system from its original orbit around the sun.

The planet, also dubbed as Earth’s twin, was not as hostile to life forms as to how it is today, if not for Jupiter’s behavior in the solar system, according to a study published in the Planetary Science Journal. The study said Jupiter changed its planetary course, moving closer and then away again from the sun. Since it is a huge

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Life on Venus? Jupiter may have made Venus inhabitable



venus habitable


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venus habitable

There’s been a lot of Venus in the news lately and for very good reason. Possible biosignatures were detected in the planet’s atmosphere, hinting at the slim chance that life in some form exists on or above the planet’s surface. But while we ponder what kind of life may exist there, researchers say that the planet probably had a good chance of being habitable if it weren’t for Jupiter’s influence.

In a new study published in the Planetary Science Journal, scientists from UC Riverside in California reveal that Jupiter likely played a big role in the current conditions we see on Venus. Had Jupiter not been involved, the planet might have ended up in a much more favorable location in our solar system.

Using computer models, the researchers suggest that Jupiter’s movement during its very early formative period likely affected Venus in a

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JPL meets unique challenge, delivers radar hardware for Jupiter mission

JPL meets unique challenge, delivers radar hardware for Jupiter mission
In this photo, shot at JPL on April 27, 2020, the transmitter undergoes random vibration testing to ensure the instrument can survive the shaking that comes with launch. Credit: JPL/NASA

Engineers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory met a significant milestone recently by delivering key elements of an ice-penetrating radar instrument for an ESA (European Space Agency) mission to explore Jupiter and its three large icy moons.


While following the laboratory’s stringent COVID-19 Safe-at-Work precautions, JPL teams managed to build and ship the receiver, transmitter, and electronics necessary to complete the radar instrument for the Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE) mission.

Set to launch in 2022, JUICE will orbit Jupiter for three years, perform multiple flybys of moons Callisto and Europa, then orbit Ganymede. The spacecraft will observe Jupiter’s atmosphere up close as well as analyze the surfaces and interiors of the three moons, which are believed to harbor liquid water

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Solving the strange storms on Jupiter — ScienceDaily

At the south pole of Jupiter lurks a striking sight — even for a gas giant planet covered in colorful bands that sports a red spot larger than the earth. Down near the south pole of the planet, mostly hidden from the prying eyes of humans, is a collection of swirling storms arranged in an unusually geometric pattern.

Since they were first spotted by NASA’s Juno space probe in 2019, the storms have presented something of a mystery to scientists. The storms are analogous to hurricanes on Earth. However, on our planet, hurricanes do not gather themselves at the poles and twirl around each other in the shape of a pentagon or hexagon, as do Jupiter’s curious storms.

Now, a research team working in the lab of Andy Ingersoll, Caltech professor of planetary science, has discovered why Jupiter’s storms behave so strangely. They did so using math derived from a

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