Cincinnati Based Gym Is First in The Nation to Use New Medical Grade Technology to Kill Viruses and Bacteria

CINCINNATI, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — A new gym based out of Cincinnati, OH is boosting client confidence for a return to the gym by utilizing a new medical grade UVGI technology that meets the CDC standard for killing viruses.  Tyler and Michelle Menke are a husband/wife duo that had a dream of opening a fitness business.  After years of research and analysis of other fitness franchises, last December they decided to take the leap and began making plans for the development of a gym concept that would incorporate their love of strength training and yoga. 

Then COVID hit…

After lots of sleepless nights, the Menke’s came to a decision to keep pursuing their dream.  Tyler, who quit his high paying medical device job to dedicate time to the gym, began making calls to old vendor contacts and found a left over UVGI system from the pop-up hospitals.  He

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How Kukri Snakes Kill | These Snakes Can Devour the Insides of Prey

  • Researchers have published a new paper describing the downright vicious way kukri snakes take down some of their prey—in this case, Asian black-spotted toads.
  • The kukri, who uses specialized teeth to create a gash in the body of the toad, destroys its prey by pulling its viscera out and consuming it creating a truly gruesome way to go.

    In a straight up savage move, small-banded kukri snakes (Oligodon fasciolatus) native to Thailand have been spotted literally tearing into Asian black-spotted toads and eating their viscera while the toads are still alive.

    🐍You love awesome animals. So do we. Let’s nerd out over them together.

    This “unknown feeding mode” has both fascinated and horrified researchers who have witnessed the phenomenon first-hand and published their findings in the journal Herpetozoa this September. According to the paper, the researchers analyzed three separate cases in which O. fasciolatus was seen

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    Future aviation capability tightens kill chain at Project Convergence

    WASHINGTON — Partnering helicopters and unmanned aircraft just a few years ago meant that a pilot could control a drone to fly ahead to conduct reconnaissance. Maybe it meant a pilot could control payloads or even the weapon systems on that drone.

    But at Project Convergence at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, this month, manned-unmanned teaming took on a far more advanced meaning.

    The Army’s Future Vertical Lift team rolled into the service’s weeks-long “campaign of learning” with 19 semi truck trailers and almost 200 people, Brig. Gen. Wally Rugen, who is in charge of the Army’s FVL modernization efforts, told Defense News in a Sept. 22 interview.

    The effort brings together future weapons and capabilities envisioned for a 2030s battlefield against near-peer adversaries such as Russia and China. It includes using a machine learning and artificial intelligence-enabled battle management system that is in development.

    Rugen said he was “very, very

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