South Korea pushes for AI semiconductors as global demand grows

The South Korean government has made no secret of its ambition to be a key player in the global artificial intelligence industry, including making the semiconductors powering AI functionalities.

This week, the country’s information and communications technology regulator announced plans to develop up to 50 types of AI -focused system semiconductors by 2030, Yonhap News Agency reported. The government will be on the hunt for thousands of local experts to lead the new wave of innovation.

South Korean has made several promises to support next-generation chip companies in recent times. Earlier this year, for example, it announced plans to spend about 1 trillion won ($870 million) on AI chips commercialization and production before 2029. Last year, President Moon Jae-in announced his “Presidential Initiative for AI” to raise public awareness on the industry.

These efforts come amid growing demand for AI-related chips, which, by McKinsey estimates, could account for almost 20%

Read More
Read More

North Korea Unveils What Appears to Be New ICBM During Military Parade

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea displayed what appeared to be its largest-ever intercontinental ballistic missile during a nighttime military parade in Pyongyang on Saturday, but it was not immediately clear if the missile would work or was for show.

The North’s leader, Kim Jong-un, has vowed to strengthen the country’s nuclear deterrent as talks with President Trump over the country’s arsenal have stalled. The rollout of the weapon comes as Mr. Kim has struggled to keep his promises to strengthen his nation’s staggering economy.

The new ICBM appeared to be much larger than North Korea’s biggest, previously disclosed long-range missile, the Hwasong-15. The size of the new missile indicated that it might fly farther and carry a more powerful nuclear warhead, South Korean and other analysts said, although it has never been flight-tested.

North Korea has been improving its missile and nuclear technologies despite Mr. Trump’s on-again, off-again diplomacy

Read More
Read More

South Korea launches antitrust probe into Google

South Korea has launched an antitrust probe into Google over its plan to enforce its 30-percent Play Store commission by disallowing any apps circumventing its payment system, a top official said Thursday.

Google has always required apps offered on the Play Store’s virtual shelves to use its payment system, which takes an industry-standard 30 percent cut — the same as Apple does.

The company has been lax about enforcing the rule, however, unlike Apple — which is currently involved in a legal battle with the owners of the Fortnite game series after banning the app when developers allowed users to circumvent the payment system.

The internet giant said last month the new policy — set to take effect next year — applies to fewer than three percent of developers with apps in the Play Store.

But the announcement prompted a backlash from South Korean app developers, who say the new

Read More
Read More

South Korea stocks fall as tensions on the peninsula reignite

SINGAPORE — South Korean stocks fell on Thursday as tensions on the Korean Peninsula reignited.

The Kospi in South Korea dropped 2.59% to close at 2,272.70 while the Kosdaq index plunged 4.33% to end its trading day at 806.95. 

The moves came following reports that South Korea’s defense ministry said North Korea had killed a missing official from the South earlier this week. It marked the first time since July 2008 that a South Korean civilian has been shot dead in North Korea, according to South Korean news agency Yonhap.

Shares of South Korean defense firm Victek soared 25.13% following the announcement, while North Korea exposed stocks Hanil Hyundai Cement and Hyundai Elevator slipped 2.76% and 1.12%, respectively.

Asia-Pacific markets decline

Elsewhere, other Asia-Pacific markets also saw losses, following an overnight drop on Wall Street.

Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index fell 1.82% to close at 23,311.07. Mainland Chinese stocks slipped

Read More
Read More

South Korea tech giants expanding robotics amid COVID-19

Sept. 23 (UPI) — South Korea’s biggest tech companies are investing in robotics as a solution to the risks of human contact amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Service robots could soon reduce the number of jobs in restaurants and hotels, however.

LG Electronics is expanding its robot business and introducing new technology in hotels that eliminates the need for human servers, South Korean news service EDaily reported Wednesday.

The company will soon introduce a robot that pours draft beer for guests at the Mayfield Hotel buffet in Seoul, according to the report.

Robots could replace workers in other areas of the hotel, including people who work in outdoor delivery, food and beverage, and even concierge services.

LG Electronics, part of the fourth-biggest conglomerate in South Korea, LG Corp., is positioned to install robots in a variety of locations, including in apartment complexes, on university campuses and playgrounds. An LG affiliate is

Read More
Read More