Software Companies Still Need To Address Legacy Systems

CEO of Rookout. Has led data-driven businesses, products and R&D teams over the last two decades, from startups to government organizations.

Cloud. Microservices. Containers. Serverless.

These are buzzwords everyone in the software industry has become familiar with. That’s not even getting into the world of “machine learning” and “AIOps” (artificial intelligence operations). While it’s true that many cutting-edge companies, particularly in the tech industry, are embracing and adopting modern software architectures and methodologies, the fact is that the large majority of companies are running legacy applications responsible for millions, if not billions, of dollars in revenue.

The pandemic has shown just how much we rely on these aging legacy IT systems. According to a recent report from AppDynamics, 66% of IT professionals say that “the pandemic has exposed weaknesses in their digital strategy, driving an urgent need to push through initiatives which were once a part of multiyear

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Opinion: Jackie Waring: Ada’s science and technology legacy lives on for women

TODAY is Ada Lovelace Day, an international celebration of the achievements of women in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM).

Ada, the daughter of the poet Lord Byron and his mathematics-loving wife Annabella Milbanke, showed her gift for mathematics at an early age introducing many computer concepts in the 19th century. However, nearly 150 years since her death, Ada’s legacy reminds us of the work still to be done to create access to more females in STEM-related fields.

According to 2019 UK Government data, women make up 24% of the core-STEM workforce. While this figure is rising, albeit slowly, in some STEM sectors, it appears to be flat-lining in technology where females account for just 17% of the workforce.

Here in Scotland there are a number of other bodies seeking to address this gender imbalance, including the Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE), an internationally renowned science-focused organisation currently run by

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IBM Offloads Legacy Business to Focus on $1 Trillion Cloud Industry

Embattled tech relic IBM (NYSE:IBM) has made many attempts to right its flagging business over the years, thus far to no avail. However, in spring 2020, CEO Arvind Krishna — former Senior Vice President of IBM’s cloud and cognitive software segment and a key player in the 2019 acquisition of Red Hat — took the reins of the company. Year-to-date results have again been lackluster, even as cloud computing has become more important than ever before during the pandemic. True to his roots, though, Krishna recently announced IBM will spin off its managed infrastructure services unit into a separate business to focus solely on the cloud.

Someone holding a tablet. Illustrated charts and data are drawn over the screen.

Image source: Getty Images.

Freeing Red Hat from dead weight

During the 2020 second quarter, IBM’s total revenue fell 5.4% year over year to $18.1 billion. Masking cloud computing segment strength — including a 17% increase in Red Hat sales and a total cloud

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IBM to Spin Off Legacy IT Business, Pegging Future on Cloud

(Bloomberg) — International Business Machines Corp. is spinning off a slower-growth business that manages corporate computer systems so it can focus on the boom in demand for cloud services and step up competition with Amazon.com Inc. and Microsoft Corp.

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The new unit, which is currently part of IBM’s global technology services division, handles day-to-day infrastructure service operations, like managing client data centers and traditional information-technology support for installing, repairing and operating equipment. It serves 4,600 clients and has an order backlog of $60 billion, according to a statement from IBM Thursday.

The shift essentially divides IBM into two, splitting its legacy IT-management services from its new hybrid-cloud computing and artificial intelligence unit, which the company hopes will return it to revenue growth — and relevancy. IBM said it aims to complete the transaction as a tax-free spinoff to IBM shareholders by the end of 2021.

The move is

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OptimizeRx: Highly Dependent On Legacy Low-Tech Advertising Platform With Ample Concerns On Financial Reporting (NASDAQ:OPRX)

OptimizeRx (OPRX) is a stock that many stripes of investors could love. They appear to be a small cap company in a solid uptrend with a history of double digit revenue growth.

Source: Finviz.com

And the most exciting part is that they look to be an up and coming telehealth name akin to Teladoc (TDOC) but with the caveat that they have largely flown under the radar of big institutional investors.

Things are unfortunately a bit more complicated at OptimizeRx, with the largest issue being that we have very real reasons to be concerned with the accuracy of OPRX’s financial statements. But first I will parse OPRX’s flowery description of their business and demonstrate that they are largely a simple advertising company that provides digital coupons.

Clipping coupons does not = the next Teladoc

Below is language from OPRX’s latest 10-k describing their business:

We are a digital health company

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