Genomes of two millipede species shed light on their evolution, development and physiology — ScienceDaily

Millipedes, those many-legged denizens of the soil surface throughout the world, don’t always get the recognition they deserve. But a new study by Jerome Hui of Chinese University of Hong Kong and colleagues puts them in the spotlight, sequencing and analyzing complete genomes from two very different millipede species. The study, publishing on September 29th in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, provides important insights into arthropod evolution, and highlights the genetic underpinnings of unique features of millipede physiology.

Millipedes and centipedes together comprise the Myriapoda — arthropods with multi-segmented trunks and many legs. Centipedes sport one pair of legs per segment, while millipedes bear two. Despite the apparent numeric implications of their names, different centipede species bear between 30 and 354 legs, and millipedes between 22 and 750. There are about 16,000 species of myriapods, including over 12,000 species of millipedes, but only two myriapod genomes have so far

Read More
Read More

Remnants of an ancient asteroid shed new light on the early solar system — ScienceDaily

Researchers have shaken up a once accepted timeline for cataclysmic events in the early solar system. About 4.5 Ga (giga-anum, or billion years ago), as a large disc of dust and ice collapsed around our newly formed star, planets and smaller celestial bodies were formed. What followed was a chaotic and violent period of collisions and impacts as the familiar eight planets carved out their orbits to resemble the balanced system we observe today. Geological and geochemical records indicate that after about 600-700 million years after formation — but still early in the solar system’s existence — the Earth-Moon system experienced a period of frequent and cataclysmic impacts from asteroids and other bodies. This period is dubbed the late heavy bombardment (LHB) period.

It was once thought that this period had a relatively sudden onset, but a research team at Hiroshima University and The University of Tokyo in Japan have

Read More
Read More

Light therapy safe and may benefit patients with TBI, study shows — ScienceDaily

Light therapy is safe and has measurable effects in the brain, according to a pioneering study by researchers from the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Senior investigators Rajiv Gupta, MD, PhD, director of the Ultra-High Resolution Volume CT Lab at MGH and Benjamin Vakoc, PhD, at the Wellman Center led the study, which was supported by a grant from the Department of Defense (DOD) and published in JAMA Network Open September 14th.

This study is one of the first, if not the first, prospective, randomized, interventional clinical trials of near-infrared, low-level light therapy (LLLT) in patients who recently suffered a moderate brain injury. If further trials support these findings, light therapy could become the first widely-accepted treatment for this type of injury.

TBI is the leading cause of traumatic injury worldwide, and an estimated 69 million people experience such an injury every year. However, there are

Read More
Read More

Army gives green light to shape vehicle electrification requirements

WASHINGTON — Army Futures Command has given the green light to the Maneuver Capabilities Development and Integration Directorate to move forward on developing a plan to equip tactical and combat vehicles with electric power, according to a Sept. 21 statement.

The directorate will begin drafting a requirements document for Tactical and Combat Vehicle Electrification (TaCVE) and will host an industry day Oct. 20 to share its electrification initiatives with industry.

CALSTART, an organization that focuses on clean technology transportation, and the Ground Vehicles Systems Center will cohost the event.

The electrification effort aims to decrease the Army’s reliance on fossil fuels. “The requirement also aims to increase operational reach across all maneuver formations through electric propulsion, which offers a variety of operational and tactical benefits,” a statement from the directorate read.

“These include the potential to double operational duration, implement silent mobility, increase silent watch, and potentially reduce the Army’s

Read More
Read More

A Seattle startup shines light on the face masks of the future

The mask works with an App that’s compatible with iOS and Android phones. People can write custom text and draw images or animations.

A Seattle woman is creating a very unique mask and helping raise funds for coronavirus relief in the process. 

Chelsea Klukas is an entrepreneur and the co-founder of the internationally acclaimed fashion technology organization MakeFasion. She spent years fusing fashion and technology in Canada before moving to Seattle a few years ago and created Lumen Couture.

Klukas creates what she calls “FashionTech for everyday wear, special events and performers.” Her collection features dresses and other garments that have been fused with embedded LED technology that brings wardrobe to life with vibrant colors, designs and even messages.  

“When the pandemic happened nobody was going out and I wasn’t involved in fashion shows and sort of created my next garment by accident,” she said.

Klukas was working on

Read More
Read More

Windows XP source code leak sheds light on Microsoft’s OS history

We’ve asked Microsoft for comment, although it already said it was “investigating the matter.” The Verge claimed the code was legitimate, with Ronin Dey and others also supporting those beliefs (via Windows Central).

One version of the code leak also includes code for MS DOS, Windows CE, Windows Embedded and Windows NT, although those aren’t believed to be new leaks. Experts talking to ZDNet believed the new leaks came from academia, which has long had access to Windows source code to help bolster its security.

This won’t necessarily lead to security issues on par with the WannaCry ransomware attack. While WannaCry exploited Windows XP flaws, the campaign succeeded in part due to poor security policies. No amount of source code will change that, especially if it doesn’t include later XP releases. Microsoft also ended regular support for Windows XP in 2014, limiting any help to organizations with special contracts.

Read More
Read More

Profoto Announces A10 Studio Light With Built-In AirX Technology; More Info at B&H

Photography News: Profoto’s A10 Studio Light adds smartphone compatibility via AirX technology

B&H is excited to share the release of Profoto’s A10 Studio Light, which introduces AirX technology to its popular round-headed flashes for smartphone control. The A10 is available for Canon, Nikon, FUJIFILM, and Sony TTL systems, and each brand-specific model is also available as a bundle with its respective Profoto Connect Wireless Transmitter providing AirTTL and HSS functionality when shooting with the light off-camera.

Profoto A10 AirTTL-C Studio Light for Canon
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1592782-REG/profoto_901230_a10_airttl_c_studio_light.html

Profoto A10 AirTTL-S Studio Light for Sony
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1592784-REG/profoto_901232_a10_airttl_s_studio_light.html

Profoto A10 AirTTL-N Studio Light for Nikon
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1592783-REG/profoto_901231_a10_airttl_n_studio_light.html

Profoto A10 AirTTL-F Studio Light for FUJIFILM
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1592785-REG/profoto_901233_a10_airttl_f_studio_light.html

The Profoto A10 shares its basic form factor and functionality with the A1X Studio Light, making it an exceptionally lightweight and intuitive flash with natural-looking light output from its characteristic 2.75″ round head. With 90-degree tilt and 360-degree rotation, it can be

Read More
Read More

Destiny 2: You’ll Need To Redownload The Full Game When Beyond Light Arrives

Destiny 2 developer Bungie is making some changes to how it updates the game, and for the upcoming Beyond Light expansion, this means you’ll need to re-download the entire game.

Bungie said in a blog post that it recongizes this could be a “painful” problem for people with slow internet or caps on their data. “We’re sorry about that,” Bungie said.

To help make this sting less, Bungie will start pre-loading for Beyond Light on the evening of November 9 PT, so people have at least 10 hours to download the expansion before it officially goes live.

The reason for the re-download requirement is that Bungie has “revamped [its] content building and patching pipeline” to help make downloads get smaller and install faster. Due to Destiny 2’s “tremendous size,” it currently takes more than 24 hours for the developer to get new patches ready, but with the Beyond Light expansion,

Read More
Read More

Guiding light: Skoltech technology puts a light-painting drone at your fingertips

Skoltech researchers have designed and developed an interface that allows a user to direct a small drone to light-paint patterns or letters through hand gestures. The new interface, DroneLight, can be used in distant communications, entertainment, and even search and rescue: https://youtu.be/SdnIqLjtGeU. The paper was published on the preprint server arXiv.org and presented at IEEE International Conference on Robot & Human Interactive Communication (IEEE RO_MAN 2020).

Drones are becoming ubiquitous both in industrial and consumer applications, and engineers are working on ways to make human-drone interaction as natural and reliable as possible. Yet, as the paper notes, “up to now, the available technologies have not made it possible to control drones intuitively without special training and additional control equipment.”

“Flight control is a challenging task as user has to manipulate with the joystick to stabilize and navigate drones. Only a very skillful operator can maintain

Read More
Read More

Shining light on heating the solar corona — ScienceDaily

In a paper published today in Nature Astronomy, researchers report the first ever clear images of nanojets — bright thin lights that travel perpendicular to the magnetic structures in the solar atmosphere, called the corona — in a process that reveals the existence of one of the potential coronal heating candidates: nanoflares.

In pursuit of understanding why the Sun’s atmosphere is so much hotter than the surface, and to help differentiate between a host of theories about what causes this heating, researchers turn to NASA’s Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission. IRIS was finely tuned with a high-resolution imager to zoom in on specific hard-to-see events on the Sun.

Nanoflares are small explosions on the Sun — but they are difficult to spot. They are very fast and tiny, meaning they are hard to pick out against the bright surface of the Sun. On April 3, 2014, during what’s

Read More
Read More