Lights on the track are helping runners shatter world records

Advancements in shoe technology have garnered headlines and stirred controversy recently for the way they boost performance. But three vaunted world records have fallen in recent weeks thanks in part to wavelight technology, a system of flashing lights that helps runners keep pace with record times.

There are no plans to use the lights at high-profile events such as the Olympics or world championships, where runners angle more for titles than for records. But the lights have been deployed in a handful of a single-day meets this year at which chasing world records was the primary target, generating buzz among fans, coaches and analysts.

Some appreciate the visual cues when watching on television or a computer. Others worry that the runners are benefiting from an artificial aid that wasn’t available to previous generations.

“If our activity is sport, our business is entertainment,” Sebastian Coe, president of World Athletics, the global

Read More
Read More

Lights, camera, fashion: Chanel show goes ahead as Paris tightens lockdown

Bruno Pavlovsky is in a good mood. It is Monday evening, and the president of Chanel’s fashion division has just received confirmation from the French government that the house’s catwalk show can go ahead the following morning.

The show, staged before 500 masked guests under the glass domes of the Grand Palais on the final day of Paris Fashion Week, had been running against the clock. Earlier on Monday, the French government ordered the closure of all bars and cafés in Paris for two weeks from Tuesday as new coronavirus infections rose to 11,500 daily.

Nevertheless, many fashion houses, including LVMH-owned Louis Vuitton and Dior, have gone ahead with live shows.

“The show is the best way to present the collection,” Pavlovsky insists. The company was forced to cancel its Cruise show in Capri in May, and instead debuted the collection online via video in June. Although it reached an

Read More
Read More

Gaming giant Razer is launching a prepaid credit card that lights up when you make payments



a stereo on a table: Razer


© Razer
Razer

  • Gaming company Razer is launching a prepaid credit card with Visa in Singapore.
  • The card is virtual, similar to the Apple Card, but users can request a premium physical card that lights up when you make payments.
  • Razer is the latest tech company to branch out into the personal finance space, along with Apple and Samsung.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

First there was the Apple Card, now there’s the Razer Card.

Loading...

Load Error

Gaming company Razer just unveiled the Razer Card, a prepaid credit card it created with Visa that will be available in beta in Singapore. Razer previously announced its ambitions to build a prepaid card in partnership with the payments giant last year, but unveiled the card and beta program on October 5.

Similar to the Apple Card, the Razer Card is a virtual card that can be accessed via the company’s

Read More
Read More

Quantum computing: Photon startup lights up the future of computers and cryptography

A fast-growing UK startup is quietly making strides in the promising field of quantum photonics. Cambridge-based company Nu Quantum is building devices that can emit and detect quantum particles of light, called single photons. With a freshly secured £2.1 million ($2.71 million) seed investment, these devices could one day underpin sophisticated quantum photonic systems, for applications ranging from quantum communications to quantum computing.

The company is developing high-performance light-emitting and light-detecting components, which operate at the single-photon level and at ambient temperature, and is building a business based on the combination of quantum optics, semiconductor photonics, and information theory, spun out of the University of Cambridge after eight years of research at the Cavendish Laboratory.

“Any quantum photonic system will start with a source of single photons, and end with a detector of single photons,” Carmen Palacios-Berraquero, the CEO of Nu Quantum, tells ZDNet. “These technologies are different things, but

Read More
Read More

Microsoft Ignite 2020 Lights Up Power Platform With Updates

Earlier this week, I published my first coverage of the virtual Microsoft Ignite 2020 conference, in which I did a flyby over a wide range of product areas—Teams, Power Platform, Azure, and more. While I did touch on some of the Power Platform announcements, today, I will continue my coverage with a more in-depth look at Microsoft’s announcements for its low-code developer platform for businesses. This platform is a great differentiator for Microsoft and one of the best enterprise tools for enabling digital transformation. It’s quickly becoming one of my favorite of the company’s offerings to follow, and with all that Microsoft does well, that’s saying something. Let’s take a closer look.

With the current digital transformation rate, accelerated even further by the pandemic, there’s just not enough developer talent out there to keep up with the demand. Many businesses, especially small-to-medium-sized companies, do not

Read More
Read More

Northern Lights Possible Over U.S. This Week As Strong Geomagnetic Storms Predicted, Say Scientists

Have you ever seen the Northern Lights? If you live in northern U.S. states near the Canadian border then the night skies could play host to the sky phenomenon—also called the aurora borealis—at around midnight local time on Monday and later in the week, too.

In the wake of the Sun “waking-up” there have been reports of strong displays of aurora in the night sky in recent weeks, but so far they’ve been confined to the Arctic Circle.

However, the latest predictions from the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (NOAA SWPC) suggest high activity is coming this week that could mean aurora borealis being visible as far south as Oregon.

Whether anyone sees them depends not only on “space weather,” but also on local weather since heavy cloud will preclude any sightings.

Where

Read More
Read More

China green lights 4 sci-tech novelty IPOs

(MENAFN) China’s securities controller has accepted the listing for the initial public offerings (IPOs) of four corporations on the science and technology novelty plank.

The China Securities Regulatory Commission stated that Wuhan Keqian Biology Co., Ltd., Road Environment Technology Co., Ltd., Zhejiang Lante Optics Co., Ltd. and Chipsea Technologies (Shenzhen) Corp., Ltd., will be scheduled on the Shanghai Stock Exchange’s sci-tech novelty board, frequently known as the STAR marketplace.

The corporations and their underwriters will corroborate the IPO dates and issue their brochures subsequent to deliberations with the stock exchange.

The STAR marketplace, installed in June last year and intended to hold up corporations in the high-tech and strategic rising sectors, eases listing criteria but adopts higher obligations for information revelation.

MENAFN3008202000450000ID1100717413


Legal Disclaimer: MENAFN provides the information “as is” without warranty of any kind. We do not accept any responsibility or liability for the accuracy, content, images, videos,

Read More
Read More

Book excerpt: ‘The Smallest Lights in the Universe’

Science, even science about the heavens, is done by people, astronomer Sara Seager reminds us throughout her new memoir, “The Smallest Lights in the Universe” (Crown, 2020).

For Seager, a renowned astronomer and planetary scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, doing science means searching for another Earth around a distant star. But being human means enduring a difficult childhood, exploring northern Canada, raising two sons, losing her husband to cancer, then falling in love anew. Her grace joining the personal and the scientific begins with the book itself, as you’ll read in the prologue below.

(Read an interview with Sara Seager about the book.)

Related: Best space and sci-fi books for 2020

The Smallest Lights in the Universe: A Memoir
Crown, 2020 | $25.20 on Amazon
In this luminous memoir, an MIT astrophysicist must reinvent herself in the wake of tragedy and

Read More
Read More