Real Time Remote Buoy/AtoN, Lantern and Environment Monitoring Kits for Ports and Waterways From SRT Marine Technology

SRT Marine Technology is pleased to announce the availability of a range of new kits that make it easy and cost effective for any port or waterway authority to significantly improve safety through effective and reliable monitoring of buoys, lanterns and the environment with real time information displayed on your existing VTS system.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201013005090/en/

New innovative AtoN monitoring kits from SRT enable port and waterway authorities to significantly enhance safety and reduce risk (Graphic: Business Wire)

These innovative new AtoN monitoring kits enable port and waterway authorities to significantly enhance safety and reduce risk by alerting relevant authorities and vessels to off-position buoys, faulty lanterns, and poor weather. By using AIS, the information is automatically displayed on existing port VTS and vessel ECDIS.

DAS Carbon-1 – Buoy, Lantern and Weather Monitoring AIS AtoN Kit – this kit enables you to

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Future ocean conditions could cause significant physical changes in marine mussels — ScienceDaily

The increased temperature and acidification of our oceans over the next century have been argued to cause significant physical changes in an economically important marine species.

Scientists from the University of Plymouth exposed blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) to current and future levels of ocean acidification (OA) or warming (W), as well as both together — commonly known as OAW.

Initial comparison of mussel shells showed that warming alone led to increased shell growth, but increasing warming and acidification led to decreased shell growth indicating that OA was dissolving their shells.

However, analysis using cutting edge electron microscopy of the shell crystal matrix or ‘ultrastructure’ revealed that, in fact, warming alone has the potential to significantly alter the physical properties of the mussels’ shells, whereas acidification mitigated some of the negative effects.

Mussels grown under warming exhibited changes in their crystal structures including a propensity for increased brittleness, which

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The first carnival of the animals and Early Palaeozoic marine life

Some of the world’s leading academics are discussing their work in a series of webinars organised by Durham University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

The series, Knowledge Across Borders, will bring together researchers who are outstanding in their fields of expertise to stimulate new, creative and critical thinking, open up new perspectives across cultures, deepen collaboration and share fresh insights.

The webinars will cover areas such as palaeontology, astronomy and science and technology as well as addressing interdisciplinary challenges.

The first webinar will be held on Thursday 29 October and will be presented by leading palaeontologists, Professor David Harper (Durham University) and Professor Renbin Zhan (Chinese Academy of Sciences/Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology).

Titled ‘The first carnival of the animals: Causes and consequences of the diversification of Early Palaeozoic marine life’, they will discuss how life has been evolving on our planet for some four billion years but

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Ancient lizard’s long, crocodile-like snout suggests it carved out a niche in a competitive marine ecosystem — ScienceDaily

A new species of an ancient marine reptile evolved to strike terror into the hearts of the normally safe, fast-swimming fish has been identified by a team of University of Alberta researchers, shedding light on what it took to survive in highly competitive ecosystems.

Gavialimimus almaghribensis, a new type of mosasaur, was catalogued and named by an international research team led by master’s student Catie Strong, who performed the research a year ago as part of an undergrad honours thesis guided by vertebrate paleontologist Michael Caldwell, professor in the Faculty of Science, along with collaborators from the University of Cincinnati and Flinders University.

More than a dozen types of mosasaur — which can reach 17 metres in length and resemble an overgrown komodo dragon — ruled over the marine environment in what is now Morocco at the tail end of the Late Cretaceous period between 72 and 66 million

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U.S. Marine Corps: Our Bases Will Be 5G Technology Test Sites

Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., is integrating emerging Verizon 5G Networking into its base operations as part of a decided effort to increase connectivity across the facility, assess new, high-speed networking technologies and better enable the use of unmanned systems.

“We are getting Fiber to more locations to find the right access points for 5G,” Nick Nilan, Director, public sector product development, Verizon, told The National Interest in an interview.

Nilan explained that the now-underway process, which involves extensive collaboration between U.S. military and commercial partners, reportedly creates networking as fast and efficiently as 1,000-times faster than existing systems.

“We operate from 30 Megabits per second up to 100 Megabits per second with a bandwidth north of 1 Gigabit per second, bringing computing elements closer to the edge,” Nilan explained.

The process, which is still very much in a nascent assessment phase, introduces a handful of new tactical possibilities

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Laundry lint can cause significant tissue damage within marine mussels — ScienceDaily

Microscopic fibres created during the laundry cycle can cause damage to the gills, liver and DNA of marine species, according to new research.

Scientists at the University of Plymouth exposed the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis), found in various locations across the world, to differing quantities of tumble dryer lint.

They demonstrated that increasing the amount of lint resulted in significant abnormality within the mussels’ gills, specifically leading to damage of tissues including deformity, extensive swelling and loss of cilia. In the liver, the presence of lint led to atrophy or deformities leading to loss of definition in digestive tubules.

The increasing concentration of fibres also led to a reduction in the mussels’ ability to filter food particles from the seawater and a significant increase in DNA strand breaks in the blood cells.

Scientists say the precise causes of the effects are not wholly clear, but are likely to

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Marine heatwaves can strengthen hurricanes — ScienceDaily

Oceanographers have found that a hurricane can be considerably strengthened in the Gulf of Mexico through the compounding effects of two extreme weather events. This process could continue in the future as ocean temperatures continue to rise around the world, according to a study co-authored by a Texas A&M University at Galveston professor.

Kyeong Park, professor and head of the Department of Marine and Coastal Environmental Science at Texas A&M-Galveston, and colleagues have had their work published in Nature Communications.

The team examined Hurricane Michael, the first Category 5 hurricane on record to impact the Florida Panhandle, in October 2018. Prior to Hurricane Michael, Tropical Storm Gordon in early September mixed cold bottom water with warm surface water, lowering the surface water temperature and increasing the capacity of absorbing more heat.

During the subsequent atmospheric heatwave, the water column could absorb more heat energy resulting in a marine heatwave,

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Discovery originates in marine biological laboratory’s neurobiology course — ScienceDaily

The dialogue between neurons is of critical importance for all nervous system activities, from breathing to sensing, thinking to running. Yet neuronal communication is so fast, and at such a small scale, that it is exceedingly difficult to explain precisely how it occurs. A preliminary observation in the Neurobiology course at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), enabled by a custom imaging system, has led to a clear understanding of how neurons communicate with each other by modulating the “tone” of their signal, which previously had eluded the field. The report, led by Grant F. Kusick and Shigeki Watanabe of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, is published this week in Nature Neuroscience.

In 2016 Watanabe, then on the Neurobiology course faculty, introduced students to the debate over how many synaptic vesicles can fuse in response to one action potential (see this 2-minute video for a quick brush-up on neurotransmission). To

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Marine Heat Waves Are Putting Caribbean Fisheries In Hot Water

Small-scale fisheries are a critical component of the social and economic and fabric of coastal communities in the Caribbean and are key to the region’s food security, with annual fish consumption ranging between 10 and 35 kg/capita per year (FAO, 2014). But marine heat waves (MHW) or extended periods of anomalously warm ocean temperatures1 can have major impacts on marine biodiversity and ecosystems, and are a significant threat to the regional fisheries sector. A 2019 study in journal, Nature Climate Change, reports that coral reefs in the Caribbean have been among the hardest hit by heat waves, and the Food and Agriculture Organisation has found that the Caribbean fisheries sector is most vulnerable to climate change in the world. (Monnereau, 2017)

According to a September article in journal, Science, as global warming makes oceans hotter, marine heat waves (MHW) have become at least 20 times more likely. “The duration,

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National Science Foundation awards $1.3 million grant to MPC’s Marine Advanced Technology Education Center

The National Science Foundation awarded a four-year, $1.3 million grant to the Marine Advanced Technology Education Center at Monterey Peninsula College to support community college students to participate in its global underwater robotics competition.



Engineer Bob Tauscher and middle school teacher Paul Aunspaugh participate in the Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Center at Monterey Peninsula College pool in 2012.  (Monterey Herald file)


© Provided by Monterey Herald
Engineer Bob Tauscher and middle school teacher Paul Aunspaugh participate in the Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Center at Monterey Peninsula College pool in 2012. (Monterey Herald file)

The center was established at MPC in 1997 with funding from the National Science Foundation. The Remote Operated Vehicle Competition was created as a core part of the center’s mission to educate and prepare students for the technical workforce. Remotely operated vehicles, or ROVs, are used in a variety of underwater activities including construction and inspection, search and recovery, energy operations, aquaculture, national defense, conservation, and research and exploration by scientists such as those at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute.

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