Astronomers solve dark matter puzzle of strange galaxy — ScienceDaily

At present, the formation of galaxies is difficult to understand without the presence of a ubiquitous, but mysterious component, termed dark matter. Astronomers have measure how much dark matter there is around galaxies, and have found that it varies between 10 and 300 times the quantity of visible matter. However, a few years ago, the discovery of a very diffuse object, named Dragonfly 44, changed this view. It was found that this galaxy has 10,000 times more dark matter than the stars. Taken back by this finding, astronomers have made efforts to see whether this object is really anomalous, or whether something went wrong in the analysis of the observations. Now we have the answer.

An international team led by the Kapteyn Institute of the University of Groningen (the Netherlands), with participation by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the University of La Laguna (ULL), has found that

Read More
Read More

Has Tesla Really Fired Its PR Department? And Does It Matter?

A few days ago, a leading electric vehicle news website in the US claimed that Tesla had dissolved its PR department, after not having been able to make contact for months. Another US website had been complaining about the same thing, but the original site (Electrek) appears to have had direct confirmation that Tesla
TSLA
did indeed no longer have a PR department, although presumably not from the PR department itself, since it no longer exists. Why has this happened, and how could Tesla possibly continue its meteoric rise without PR?

Although Electrek calls this an industry first, it isn’t such a surprising move if you take a step back

Read More
Read More

Based on optical matter, new machines could be used to move and manipulate tiny particles — ScienceDaily

Researchers have developed a tiny new machine that converts laser light into work. These optically powered machines self-assemble and could be used for nanoscale manipulation of tiny cargo for applications such as nanofluidics and particle sorting.

“Our work addresses a long-standing goal in the nanoscience community to create self-assembling nanoscale machines that can perform work in conventional environments such as room temperature liquids,” said research team leader Norbert F. Scherer from the University of Chicago.

Scherer and colleagues describe the new nanomachines in Optica, The Optical Society’s (OSA) journal for high-impact research. The machines are based on a type of matter known as optical matter in which metal nanoparticles are held together by light rather than the chemical bonds that hold together the atoms that make up typical matter.

“Both the energy for assembling the machine and the power to make it work come from light,” said Scherer. “Once

Read More
Read More

Scientists find evidence of exotic state of matter in candidate material for quantum computers

Scientists find evidence of exotic state of matter in candidate material for quantum computers
An illustration of the crystal structure of ruthenium trichloride showing the simple honeycomb lattice of ruthenium ions and chlorine ions. The twisted octahedra formed by chlorine around the electron spin of each ruthenium atom are mirror images of each other. This twist is key to the compound’s unusual behavior, which is evidence that it may contain an example of a quantum spin liquid. Credit: Courtesy of Arkady Shekhter/ National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

Using a novel technique, scientists working at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory have found evidence for a quantum spin liquid, a state of matter that is promising as a building block for the quantum computers of tomorrow.


Researchers discovered the exciting behavior while studying the so-called electron spins in the compound ruthenium trichloride. Their findings, published today in the journal Nature Physics , show that electron spins interact across the material, effectively lowering

Read More
Read More

Astrophysicists figure out the total amount of matter in the universe

The stuff that makes up our universe is tricky to measure, to put it mildly. We know that most of the universe’s matter-energy density consists of dark energy, the mysterious unknown force that’s driving the universe’s expansion. And we know that the rest is matter, both normal and dark.

Accurately figuring out the proportions of these three is a challenge, but researchers now say they’ve performed one of the most precise measurements yet to determine the proportion of matter.

According to their calculations, normal matter and dark matter combined make up 31.5 percent of the matter-energy density of the universe. The remaining 68.5 percent is dark energy.

“To put that amount of matter in context, if all the matter in the universe were spread out evenly across space, it would correspond to an average mass density equal to only about six hydrogen atoms per cubic meter,” said astronomer Mohamed Abdullah 

Read More
Read More

Gravity As Matter Warping Space-Time Now 500 Times Harder To Disprove

KEY POINTS

  • Many experts cast doubts on Einstein’s theory for more than a century
  • A new study proved Einstein’s theory of relativity aligns with present-day quantum physics
  • The conclusion was based on the first photo of a supermassive black hole

Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity becomes 500 times harder to negate as the first image ever taken of supermassive blackholes made a stronger case that gravity, indeed, is a matter warping spacetime. The photo of the black hole’s shadow was consistent with astrophysical findings of the much later time, therefore giving significant weight to Einstein’s idea of general relativity. 

Einstein’s theory that gravity is caused by a warping spacetime has been under the scientific lens for more than 100 years. Many experts of modern times have cast their doubts on his finding, saying that it remains mathematically irreconcilable with the foundation of quantum mechanics. 

In general, quantum physicists assert that

Read More
Read More

Can Dark Matter Really Explain The Universe’s Structure?

One of the most puzzling components of the Universe has to be dark matter. Although we have extraordinary astrophysical evidence that the normal matter in the Universe — the stuff made out of known particles in the Standard Model — cannot account for the majority of the gravitational effects we observe, all of that evidence is indirect. We still have yet to obtain a shred of repeatable, verifiable direct evidence for whatever particle might be responsible for dark matter. The total evidence places very tight constraints on any non-gravitational interactions

Read More
Read More

What’s The Matter With The Universe? Scientists Have The Answer

A team of US astrophysicists has produced one of the most precise measurements ever made of the total amount of matter in the Universe, a longtime mystery of the cosmos.

The answer, published in The Astrophysical Journal on Monday, is that matter consists of 31.5 percent — give or take 1.3 percent — of the total amount of matter and energy that make up the Universe.

The remaining 68.5 percent is dark energy, a mysterious force that is causing the expansion of the Universe to accelerate over time, and was first inferred by observations of distant supernovae in the late 1990s.

Put another way, this means the total amount of matter in the observable Universe is equivalent to 66 billion trillion times the mass of our Sun, Mohamed Abdullah, a University of California, Riverside astrophysicist and the paper’s lead author told AFP.

Most of this matter — 80 percent —

Read More
Read More

Boiling points: 8 ways in which The Leadership reveals STEMM’s gender problems | Dark Matter Distribution: The Leadership

The ‘likeability’ and not being ‘difficult’ trap

For women, there’s an inverse relationship between success and likeability. The fate of figures such as Hillary Clinton prove that the more ambition a woman exercises, the less palatable she may be perceived to be. In The Leadership, brilliant female scientists reveal the hostility they’ve encountered during field work, often undertaken in remote, high-pressure locations. Science communicator Fern Hames recalls working in an environment with 28 men and being told “we don’t have women scientists”. She also reveals that although a male colleague once left shotgun holes in her field hut, she didn’t want to be seen as ‘difficult’ by reporting it: “I didn’t want to make waves, it was my first proper job.” It’s an extreme example that illustrates how women who are successes in their fields can be vilified for simply turning up and doing their jobs.

“I grew up in a family where it was a given that girls can do anything, then suddenly it was ‘no, actually you can’t’. It was an enormous disappointment” - Fern Hames



  • “I grew up in

Read More
Read More