Meet the New Innovators: 6 Entrepreneurs Building the Future of the Art World, Now

A version of this article first appeared in the fall 2020 Artnet Intelligence Report, which you can download for free here. 

These founders, visionaries, and upstarts are part of Artnet’s New Innovators List. Whether developing new software or constructing novel platforms for exchange, these six innovators remind us that you can’t build the future with outmoded tools.

See the complete list of the New Innovators here and check back for more in-depth profiles in the coming days.

 

Tyler Woolcott, 38, Director of StudioVisit, London

Tyler Woolcott, Owner StudioVisit London.

Tyler Woolcott, Owner StudioVisit London.

Thanks to Tyler Woolcott, artists can now make much-needed money by offering bespoke visits to their studios, priced up to £250 per person. “They are fully in control,” Woolcott says. “StudioVisit gives artists the tools to become a self-sustaining, independent institution.” The expat American has nearly 40 artists on his books—and the list is growing. Tours are by necessity mostly virtual

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Google launches Meet breakout rooms for small group discussions

Huge online classes can be overwhelming, not just for teachers but also for students who learn better when interacting with others. To help solve that problem, Google has launched a new Meet feature called “breakout rooms,” which would give educators a way to divide participants into smaller groups during video calls. At the moment, the feature is exclusively available to Enterprise for Education customers, but the tech giant says it will be available to more users (including Education and standard Enterprise customers) later this year.

Google said the ability to group people and put them smaller rooms was highly requested, since it has the potential to increase engagement by allowing simultaneous small group discussions. The call’s creator can make up to 100 breakout rooms in a call. Participants will be randomly and evenly distributed across the rooms, but the organizer can manually move them into different rooms if needed. Moderators

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Meet the Tech Interactive’s new CEO

The Tech Interactive introduced Katrina Stevens as its new president and CEO on Tuesday morning, ushering in what promises to be a new era for the downtown San Jose science and learning center. And she says that the Tech as a vital role to play even with its doors closed because of the pandemic.

“Oftentimes, the spark that ignites young people happens outside the classrooms,” said Stevens, 49, who is currently the Director of Learning Science at the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. “Informal learning spaces have always had a key role, and, in the time of COVID, I think the Tech has an even more important role. Educators and parents right now are scrambling to find really high-quality resources they can do with minimal tools at home and the Tech is perfectly positioned to be able to do that.”

She says she was impressed by the Tech’s ability to take its

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Meet the Virginia Doctor Running for Congress in the Year of Covid-19

Dr. Cameron Webb

Dr. Cameron Webb
Photo: Courtesy Webb campaign

Even in ordinary times, 37-year-old Dr. Cameron Webb’s campaign to become a Democratic house representative for Virginia’s 5th Congressional District would be noteworthy.

If elected, Webb would be the first Black physician elected to Congress with a vote in the nation’s history (the first Black physician elected in Congress was Dr. Donna Christian-Christensen, who held office from 1997 to 2015 but was a non-voting delegate from the Virgin Islands). He would also be the first Democratic representative from the district since 2008, which intersects with a county that voted for Trump in 2016 and Obama in 2008 and 2012.

However, in the midst of a pandemic that has killed more than a million people worldwide and more than 200,000 Americans, a doctor trying to become a member of Congress carries a certain added poignance.

“Covid-19 has become the lens through which we

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Zoologists uncover new example of rapid evolution — meet the Sulawesi Babblers — ScienceDaily

Zoologists from Trinity College Dublin, working in tropical Southeast Asia, have uncovered a modern-day example of rapid evolution in action.

The zoologists have discovered that male and female Sulawesi Babblers (Pellorneum celebense, a species of bird) have evolved to attain different sizes on small islands, and in quick-fire time. They believe this is most likely due to evolutionary pressure favouring such “dimorphism” because the birds are able to reduce competition with each other by feeding on different, scarce resources.

The research, completed with the support of the Irish Research Council and collaborators in Universitas Halu Oleo, is published today in the journal Biotropica. The research shows that the males of the Sulawesi Babbler grow to be up to 15% larger than the females — with this difference particularly marked on the smaller islands.

Fionn Ó Marcaigh, first author on the paper and a PhD Candidate in Trinity’s

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NASA Ingenuity: Meet the woman launching a helicopter on Mars

What does it take to build a helicopter to fly on Mars? 

For starters, you can forget the remote control. Mars is more than 30 million miles away on a good day, so the time delay in sending and receiving signals means you couldn’t fly the spacecraft with a joystick — you have to send waypoints in advance from here on Earth and hope for the best. 

MiMi Aung, project leader of NASA’s Mars Ingenuity Helicopter Project, observes a flight test with JPL engineers Teddy Tzanetos (left) and Bob Balaram. 


NASA/JPL-Caltech

It also needs to charge itself. And it has to be able to take off in the incredibly thin Martian atmosphere (roughly 100 times thinner than Earth’s atmosphere), meaning the entire helicopter — including solar panel, batteries, computers, rotors and landing gear — has to weigh less than 4 pounds. And how do you test it in a simulated

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Google, Oracle meet in copyright clash at Supreme Court

WASHINGTON (AP) — Tech giants Google and Oracle are clashing at the Supreme Court in a copyright dispute that’s worth billions and important to the future of software development.

The case before the justices Wednesday has to do with Google’s creation of the Android operating system now used on the vast majority of smartphones worldwide. Google says that to create Android, which was released in 2007, it wrote millions of lines of new computer code. But it also used 11,330 lines of code and an organization that’s part of Oracle’s Java platform.

Google has defended its actions, saying what it did is long-settled, common practice in the industry, a practice that has been good for technical progress. But Oracle says Google “committed an egregious act of plagiarism” and sued, seeking more than $8 billion.

The case has been going on for a decade. Google won the first round when a

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Meet The Moorestown School Board Candidates: Mick Weeks

MOORESTOWN, NJ — When voters cast their ballots in the Nov. 3 elections, they will be asked to choose three people from a field of six to serve on the Moorestown Public School District’s Board of Education.

Patch asked each candidate to answer questions to give voters information about who they are and their stances on various issues. We are printing their responses in full, unedited except for spelling or punctuation. Below are the responses from incumbent Board Member Mick Weeks.

Previous elective office, if any

Served one term on Moorestown BOE from 2017-19.

Does anyone in your family work for the school district or in politics?

BA — Seton Hall University — Communications & Anthropology, 1992
MPA — University of Kentucky — Master of Public Administration, 1996

Technology Sales — Northeast Strategic Account Executive for Higher Education at Jamf, LLC — In my current role at Jamf, LLC I

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Meet Amazon’s Biggest Bull

It is hard to argue with Amazon’s (AMZN) performance in 2020. Even amidst a global pandemic and a struggling economy, all the cards have fallen into place for the e-commerce behemoth. Amazon has seen revenue soar during the viral outbreak and so has its stock. Shares are up by 70% on a year-to-date basis.

However, one analyst thinks the Street has got it all wrong on Amazon. So, is there a bear among the long list of Wall Street Amazon bulls?

On the contrary. Pivotal analyst Michael Levine argues the Street is undervaluing Amazon’s SOTP (sum of the parts). In fact, the analyst calls Amazon “the best mega cap on a multiyear basis” and has just increased his price target to a Street high of $4,500. Levine, therefore, expects shares to add another 43% from current levels. No need to add, but the analyst’s rating stays a Buy.

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Meet The Berkeley Dropout And Berkeley MBA Who Just Raised $3.25 Million For Their No-Code Platform For E-Commerce

Builder, a no-code platform which targets e-commerce websites and was cofounded by Berkeley dropout Steve Sewell and Berkeley MBA Brent Locks, announced today that it has raised $3.25 million in seed funding led by Greylock. Other investors include Warby Parker’s cofounders Dave Gilboa and Neil Blumenthal, Allbirds’ cofounder Joey Zwillinger, Harry’s cofounder Jeff Raider, and PopSugar’s cofounder Brian Sugar.

Builder is a full no-code tool which means that the user can simply drag and drop to create any type of content, particularly in the marketing section.

Steve Sewell, who serves as the company’s CEO, says that when he used to lead web engineering at a company called ShopStyle, they identified that one of the biggest problems was that once a website was built, there wasn’t a lot of tooling around it. 

Sewell says that it would often

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