What Is A Data Processing Unit (DPU) And Why Is NVIDIA Betting On It?

At the GPU Technology Conference 2020, Jensen Huang, NVIDIA’s CEO, unveiled a new family of processors branded as the BlueField-2 Data Processing Unit (DPU). The DPU is accessible to the developers via the software platform, the DOCA SDK. The DPU and DOCA SDK are comparable to NVIDIA’s powerful combination of GPU hardware and CUDA software.  

Having dominated the AI accelerator market, NVIDIA is now aiming to expand it to the data center infrastructure acceleration and optimization. 

Why is Jensen Huang bullish about the DPU market and how it matters to the enterprise data center? Here is an attempt to explain the evolution of DPU in simple terms.

The Aggregation and Disaggregation of Enterprise Infrastructure

During the 90s, the combination of Intel x86 CPU and OS software offered unmatched power to enterprises. The rise of client/server computing, followed by n-tier computing, paved the way for distributed computing.

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Microsoft 365 to get big Nvidia AI-editing boost

Disclosure: Most of the vendors mentioned are clients of the author.

Nvidia’s big fall show, GTC (GPU Technology Conference), offered a lot of artificial intelligence news this week, ranging from autonomous robots to AIs that write the software they use. This matters to me because I’m a heavy Microsoft 365 user — I currently rely on Grammarly for automated editing — and Nvidia announced that Microsoft would be using Nvidia’s AI in Microsoft 365, initially for grammar correction, Q&A helper bots, and text prediction. 

This move is only the start, so let’s look at how this AI capability could boost your productivity and evolve over the next few years.

Making Microsoft 365 smart: Step 1

One of the biggest frustrations for me is that even with products like IBM Watson in the market, we still don’t have smart digital assistants. Most translate queries into text, post them in a search

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NVIDIA Wants To Change The Game Yet Again With The ‘DPU’

This week, I tuned into NVIDIA’s annual GPU Technology Conference, or GTC, albeit virtually due to the pandemic. The processor powerhouse has a long history of category-defining innovation, dating back to its launch of the first 3D GPU in 1999. This week’s keynote was chock full of news and innovation, including another all-new processor category designed to muscle NVIDIA into the datacenter market. Let’s take a look at the new processor and several other announcements from GTC 2020.

Look out, data center market

One of the most significant announcements was the unveiling of the DPU (data processing unit)—a whole new category of processors designed to offload networking, security, and storage tasks from CPUs in the data center. Essentially, you can think of these DPUs as smart NICs. Under the new family moniker BlueField, NVIDIA unveiled the first two of these accelerators: the BlueField-2 and the BlueField-2X.

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Nvidia and Huawei face uncertain future in Britain’s high-tech capital

University of Cambridge

Geography Photos/UIG via Getty Images

LONDON — Situated in the middle of China and the U.S., the English university city of Cambridge has found itself at the center of two massive tech sagas.

U.S. chip maker Nvidia and Chinese hardware manufacturer Huawei have big expansion plans in Cambridge but both companies have big hurdles to overcome if their dreams are to be realized.

Nvidia hopes to acquire Cambridge-headquartered Arm for $40 billion and set up a new “world-class” AI center in the city, while Huawei plans to build a £1 billion ($1.3 billion) research lab in Sawston, located roughly eight miles from Cambridge city center.

Renowned for being one of the world’s greatest intellectual powerhouses, Cambridge is home to thousands of tech workers and companies like Amazon, Microsoft and Apple all employ highly-educated research teams in the city. “Lots of tech companies want to get foothold in

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Nvidia Promises The Pervasiveness Of AI And A New Data Center Architecture

Just after coming off two major industry announcements – the introduction of the highest performing consumer graphic cards and the proposed acquisition of Arm – Nvidia launched its largest virtual Graphics Technology Conference (GTC) on October 5, 2020. Unlike the spring 2020 GTC, which was changed to a virtual conference at the last moment due to COVID-19, this one resembled a more traditional GTC with the kickoff by CEO Jenson Huang revealing a flurry of product and technology announcements. Dressed in his trademark leather jacket and standing in the middle of his kitchen (again), Mr. Huang provided a glimpse into Nvidia’s new solutions for the data center, edge AI, healthcare, and a new suite of collaborative tools.

There were two key areas of focus for this GTC – the growing pervasiveness of AI and a proposed change

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Why Nvidia Has Pivoted to Software

Every day the greatest companies in tech are reimagining what’s possible and pushing the boundaries to create new markets. That’s why Nvidia ((NVDA) -Get Report) keeps winning.

The Santa Clara, Calif.-based company Monday announced a Maxine, a cloud-based set of developer tools to help businesses build better videoconferencing software.

That’s right, a company best known cutting edge hardware, also makes innovative software tools.

Software is the reason investors should continue to buy Nvidia shares.

It’s hard to explain but in 2007, at the beginning of the cloud computing revolution, Jensen Huang, Nvidia’s chief executive decided to go all-in on artificial intelligence. The choice baffled many pundits because AI had been a lost cause for big tech so far.

Since the 1970s technologists have been drawn to the idea of computers learning to process data efficiently like the human brain. Huang made the case succinctly in 2016 when he

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Nvidia Analysts Laud New Products and Growth Outlook

Nvidia  (NVDA) – Get Report shares rose on Tuesday after analysts praised the semiconductor titan as it unveiled new products and issued a strong growth outlook for its data-center market.

The Santa Clara, Calif., graphics-chip specialist made the announcements during a technology conference. 

Nvidia’s shares recently traded at $564.08, up 3.4%. They have well more than doubled year to date. And they have more than tripled since they touched a 52-week low $176.50 almost exactly a year ago.

As for the analyst comments, “Nvidia’s pace of innovation appears to be accelerating, and its execution is going into overdrive as it continues to expand its ecosystem and open up a much larger [total addressable market] in the compute landscape,” wrote BMO Capital Markets analyst Ambrish Srivastava.

He rates the stock outperform and increased his share-price target to $650 from $565.

J.P. Morgan analyst Harlan Sur has an overweight rating

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NVIDIA Will Build The UK’s “Most Powerful” Supercomputer To Boost COVID-19 Research

NVIDIA has announced plans to invest £40 million to build the UK’s fastest supercomputer which will be used for AI research in the healthcare sector.

The Cambridge-1 will be an NVIDIA DGX SuperPOD system capable of delivering more than 400 petaflops of AI performance and 8 petaflops of Linpack performance. This will give the supercomputer a spot among the world’s 30 most powerful supercomputers, according to Nvidia, and it will also be among the three most energy-efficient supercomputers on the current Green500 list.

“Tackling the world’s most pressing challenges in healthcare requires massively powerful computing resources to harness the capabilities of AI,” said NVIDIA founder and CEO

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Nvidia lays out plan to create new kind of data center chip

(Reuters) – Nvidia Corp <NVDA.O> on Monday laid out a multi-year plan to create a new kind of chip for data centers, aimed at siphoning off more functions from its chief rival Intel Corp <INTC.O>.

Models with limited features will debut in months, while full-fledged versions are planned within two years, Nvidia said in a press briefing. Server companies such as Dell Technologies <DELL.N> and Lenovo Group Ltd <0992.HK> plan to integrate them into their machines, it added.

Nvidia chips have long been used to improve video game graphics, but in recent years they have helped to speed up artificial intelligence tasks such as image recognition. The chips typically sit alongside an Intel central processor, offloading some of the computing work.

Nvidia is now seeking to grab more tasks with its proposed series of “data processing unit” chips. They will combine networking technology acquired with Nvidia’s $6.9 billion purchase of

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Nvidia intros new Ampere GPUs for visual computing

Nvidia on Monday unveiled its latest batch of technology focused on the areas of graphics, AI, enterprise and edge computing, robotics, and remote collaboration. The company, which is holding its virtual GTC 2020 event this week, introduced the CloudXR on AWS platform, the Omniverse design and collaboration platform, and new Ampere GPUs for visual computing.

The RTX A6000 and the A40 are Nvidia’s latest GPU designs based on Ampere architecture. The RTX A6000 is designed for the new era of visual computing, Nvidia said. The GPU will replace the Turing version of the Quadro, while the A40 — which is a passive cooling version of the same card — is the successor to the RTX 6000 and RTX 8000 GPUs. 

Nvidia said the GPUs are targeted at visual compute use cases such as rendering and virtual workstations, with Nvidia AI and machine learning software running on the entire product line.

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