U.S. Supreme Court divided over Google’s bid to end Oracle’s Android copyright lawsuit

(Reuters) — The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided on Wednesday as it considered whether to protect Alphabet’s Google from a long-running lawsuit by Oracle accusing it of infringing Oracle copyrights to build the Android operating system that runs most of the world’s smartphones.

The shorthanded court, down one justice following last month’s death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, heard oral arguments in Google’s appeal of a lower court ruling reviving the lawsuit in which Oracle has sought at least $8 billion in damages.

Some of the eight justices expressed concern that Google simply copied Oracle’s software code instead of innovating and creating its own for mobile devices. Others emphasized that siding with Oracle could give software developers too much power with potentially harmful effects on the technology industry.

A jury cleared Google in 2016, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit overturned that decision in 2018,

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Supreme Court hears Oracle’s claims that Google violated copyright law in using Java to create Android

The case, which has broad ramifications for the software industry, has bounced around various courts over the years. In 2016, jurors ruled Google’s use of the Java code was permitted as “fair use” under federal copyright law. Two years later, a federal appeals court overturned that, ruling that there is “nothing fair about taking a copyrighted work verbatim and using it for the same purpose and function as the original in a competing platform.”

The dispute centers on the technical way software developers use application programming interfaces, or APIs. That’s the computer code that enables websites and applications to work together. APIs also reduce the amount of basic computer coding developers need to write with each program.

Google contends that it only used the pieces of Java code that it could not re-create when developing Android.

“Software programs have always worked with each other, that’s why you can take a

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Oracle’s data science offering aids domestic violence research

Oracle’s data science offering aids domestic violence research
















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Oracle’s data science offering aids domestic violence research

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At Victoria University, we need a strong technology foundation so we can continue doing what we do best—providing a world-class educational experience for our students. Oracle has been our partner in making that possible and we have always been able to rely on cutting-edge technology, reliability, and security so we can

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Meet the 5 marketing stars in Oracle’s bid to be a major cloud player

  • Oracle’s TikTok deal is seen as a PR and marketing coup for the enterprise firm, which could help raise its profile in the cloud where it faces stronger rivals Amazon, Microsoft, and Google. 
  • Marketing is key element of Oracle’s cloud offensive as the tech giant seeks to change the narrative that it missed what has become the most important trend in the enterprise market.
  • Meet the 5 marketing superstars who are spearheading Oracle’s bid to portray the company as an emerging cloud giant.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

As Oracle grapples with the view that it’s an inconsequential player in the cloud, the tech behemoth has been pushing to tell a different story. 

Big customer announcements have recently helped raise Oracle’s profile in cloud computing, including winning over Zoom, the popular video conferencing company, and video app TikTok, which will be a marquee client if the companies’ much-discussed,

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