Microsoft’s Azure AD authentication outage: What went wrong

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Credit: Microsoft

On September 28 and September 29 this week, a number of Microsoft customers worldwide were impacted by a cascading series of problems resulting in many being unable to access their Microsoft apps and services. On October 1, Microsoft posted its post-mortem about the outages, outlining what happened and next steps it plans to take to head this kind of issue off in the future.

Starting around 5:30 p.m. ET on Monday, September 28, customers began reporting they couldn’t sign into Microsoft and third-party applications which used Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) for authentication. (Yes, this means Office 365 and other Microsoft cloud services.) Those who were already signed in were less likely to have had issues. According to Microsoft’s report, users in the Americas and Australia were likely to be impacted more than those in Europe and Asia.

Microsoft acknowledged it was a service update targeting an internal

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Apple services outage impacted App Store, Apple Music, Apple TV+, Apple News, iCloud for three hours

Apple suffered a sweeping services outage on Tuesday night, with major platforms like the App Store, Apple Music, Apple Arcade, iCloud and others rendered inaccessible for several hours.

Trouble started at around 8 p.m. Eastern, according to Apple’s System Status webpage. As of this writing, some 25 services have been down for nearly two hours.

“Users are experiencing a problem with the App Store. We are investigating and will update the status as more information becomes available,” Apple said.

Currently, the App Store, Apple Arcade, Apple Books, Apple Business Manager, Apple Music, Apple School Manager, Apple TV+, Apple TV Channels, Apple Care in iOS, Find My, Game Center, iCloud Account and Sign-In, iCloud backup, iCloud Calendar, iCloud Contacts, iCloud Mail, iCloud.com, iTunes U, iWork for iCloud, the Mac App Store, News, Photos, Radio and Schoolwork are down. Apple resolved issues with Apple Card and Apple Cash, though the two

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What Caused The Massive Microsoft Teams, Office 365 Outage Yesterday? Here’s What We Know

Cloud-based Microsoft applications, including Microsoft Teams, went down across a swathe of the U.S. yesterday.

Users of Microsoft Office 365, Outlook, Exchange, Sharepoint, OneDrive and Azure also reported they were unable to login. Instead, they were presented with a “transient error” message informing them there was a problem signing them in.

These issues appear to have started at around 5 p.m. ET, with services not returning to normal for many until 10 p.m. ET.

Indicative of the times we live in, whenever such an outage impacts so many people, the question of whether it’s an ongoing cyber-attack is front and center.

However, there is no evidence this was the case last night. So what did happen to take down access to Microsoft Teams, with work from home users taking to Twitter to complain of

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Microsoft’s Office 365 Back From Outage Lasting Several Hours

(Bloomberg) — Microsoft Corp.‘s Office 365, Teams and some of its other online services experienced service interruptions lasting several hours before being resolved on Monday.

A company spokesman confirmed the outages, which also impacted Exchange Online and OneDrive. He didn’t have any information on the causes.

Problems with some of the services were reported earlier on Monday by Downdetector, which aggregates user reports of issues. That suggests the outages had lasted a number of hours before being taken up by Microsoft’s recovery team, though they have since been resolved, according to the company’s status updates.

Office 365 packages popular Microsoft software such as Word, PowerPoint and Excel into an online subscription. Teams is a chat and collaboration tool that integrates with Office 365, similar in function to Slack Technologies Inc.’s titular service. The disruption followed a similar incident last week when some users of Google’s G Suite cloud productivity tools

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Microsoft 365 Outage Affects Multiple Services | Top News

(Reuters) – Microsoft Corp

said late Monday a recent change it introduced likely caused a major outage, affecting users’ access to multiple Microsoft 365 services, including Outlook.com and Microsoft Teams.

The developer of Windows and Office software said it did not “observe an increase in successful connections” even after it rolled back the change to mitigate the impact.

“A moment ago nothing was working, then I went into files in Teams and it was working, now nothing is working. Well I guess now I have an excuse to not do work and watch TV,” one Twitter user tweeted.

“We’re pursuing mitigation steps for this issue. In parallel, we’re rerouting traffic to alternate systems to provide further relief to the affected users,” Microsoft said on its status page, without specifying how many users were affected.

Several other Twitter users complained that the outage meant they could miss their job interviews and

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Office 365 outage ongoing after roll back fails

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Screenshot: Chris Duckett/ZDNet

Microsoft is currently looking into an authentication error hitting its Office 365 systems.

“Starting at approximately 21:25 UTC, a subset of customers in the Azure Public and Azure Government cloud may encounter errors performing authentication operations for a number of Microsoft/Azure services, including access to the Azure Portals,” the company said in a status post.

In another post, the company said users would be unable to access Office.com, Outlook.com, Teams, Power Platform, and Dynamics365.

“Existing customer sessions are not impacted and any user who is logged in to an existing session would be able to continue their sessions,” Microsoft said.

On its Twitter status account, Microsoft said the root cause appeared to be a recent change, and that it had decided to roll the change back.

“We’ve rolled back the change that is likely the source of impact and are monitoring the environment to validate that

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