How Is Microchip Technology’s (NASDAQ:MCHP) CEO Paid Relative To Peers?

Steve Sanghi became the CEO of Microchip Technology Incorporated (NASDAQ:MCHP) in 1991, and we think it’s a good time to look at the executive’s compensation against the backdrop of overall company performance. This analysis will also evaluate the appropriateness of CEO compensation when taking into account the earnings and shareholder returns of the company.

Check out our latest analysis for Microchip Technology

How Does Total Compensation For Steve Sanghi Compare With Other Companies In The Industry?

According to our data, Microchip Technology Incorporated has a market capitalization of US$29b, and paid its CEO total annual compensation worth US$6.9m over the year to March 2020. That’s a notable decrease of 46% on last year. We think total compensation is more important but our data shows that the CEO salary is lower, at US$811k.

For comparison, other companies in the industry with market capitalizations above US$8.0b, reported a median total CEO compensation

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Apple halts fee on Facebook paid online events

Apple will no longer collect a 30% fee on Facebook’s paid online events.


James Martin/CNET

For the remainder of 2020, Apple will stop collecting a 30% App Store tax for Facebook’s paid online events feature, which is geared toward helping small businesses make money during the coronavirus pandemic. On Friday, Facebook said businesses can now keep all their earnings from paid online events, minus applicable taxes, until Dec. 31. 

Facebook Pay will be used to process all paid online events purchases, which means businesses and creators won’t have to pay that 30% App Store tax through the rest of the year. 

“This is a difficult time for small businesses and creators, which is why we are not collecting any fees from paid online events while communities remain closed for the

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Apple won’t collect fees on paid Facebook events until 2021

Now, Apple has agreed to let Facebook Pay process all paid online event purchases. This means Facebook can absorb the cost, and Apple won’t get a cut. But this agreement only lasts until December 31st.

“Apple has agreed to provide a brief, three-month respite after which struggling businesses will have to, yet again, pay Apple the full 30 percent App Store tax,” a Facebook spokesperson said. Facebook will not collect fees until August 2021.

The other big catch is that Facebook Gaming creators are left out of the deal. They’ll still have to hand over 30 percent of earnings that come through the iOS app.

“Apple’s decision to not collect its 30 percent tax on paid online events comes with a catch: gaming creators are excluded from using Facebook Pay in paid online events on iOS,” said Vivek Sharma, VP of Facebook Gaming. “We unfortunately had to make this concession

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Apple Suspends Commissions for Apps Offering Paid Online Events Due to Coronavirus

Apple Inc.


AAPL 3.75%

said it is giving some businesses a reprieve from paying a 30% commission on paid events and experiences through mobile apps, a move that comes as the App Store owner faces scrutiny from software developers and regulators over how its digital marketplace operates.

The announcement Friday follows a

Facebook Inc.


FB 2.12%

statement confirming that Apple approved its request to exempt businesses hosting live online events through its app from being required to pay a cut of sales to Apple.

Apple’s move, which will last until the end of the year, is significant because the company doesn’t normally allow app developers to process payments for in-app purchases themselves or use third-party services, saying those alternative platforms could pose security risks.

The technology company instead makes developers use its own payment system and takes a 30% cut of sales from paid apps and in-app purchases, as well

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Apple Temporarily Waives 30% Fee for Facebook Paid Live Events, but Not for Gaming Creators

In an unusual move, Apple has agreed to not collect the App Store’s 30% “tax” on purchases made through Facebook’s app for live paid events — but only through the end of 2020. Moreover, Apple will still take a 30% cut of paid livestreams from video-game creators using the paid-livestream feature.

The ongoing clash of tech titans is the latest in the public fight some app developers are waging against Apple over its App Store business practices, which they say are unfair.

Facebook complained that Apple agreed only to a short moratorium on collecting in-app fees for paid live events, which it launched last month. For its part, Facebook says it won’t take a cut of creators or businesses’ revenue for livestreaming events until at least August 2021, citing economic hardships inflicted by the COVD pandemic.

“Apple has agreed to provide a brief, three-month respite after which struggling businesses will

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Apple Drops 30% Fee for Facebook Paid Live Events, Excludes Gamers

In an unusual move, Apple has agreed to not collect the App Store’s 30% “tax” on purchases made through Facebook’s app for live paid events — but only through the end of 2020. Moreover, Apple will still take a 30% cut of paid livestreams from video-game  creators using the paid-livestream feature.

The ongoing clash of tech titans is the latest in the public fight some app developers are waging against Apple over its App Store business practices, which they say are unfair.

Facebook complained that Apple agreed only to a short moratorium on collecting in-app fees for paid live events, which it launched last month. For its part, Facebook says it won’t take a cut of creators or businesses’ revenue for livestreaming events until at least August 2021, citing economic hardships inflicted by the COVD pandemic.

“Apple has agreed to provide a brief, three-month respite after which struggling businesses will

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