Climate change threatens Coachella Valley, Palm Springs tourism, study says

Climate change threatens Coachella Valley, Palm Springs tourism, study says
Climate change threatens Coachella Valley, Palm Springs tourism, study says

The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival is one of the most famous music festivals in the world and is also amongst the most profitable, grossing an impressive $114.6 million in 2017, which set a record for the first recurring festival franchise to earn over $100 million. Coachella, Stagecoach and the BNP Paribas Open tennis tournament are attractions that have drawn millions to the Coachella Valley over the years, but scientists warn that this could change as extreme heat becomes a dangerous reality.

The Coachella Valley is a desert region in southern California with virtually zero annual rainfall and an annual average temperature of 22.8°C, which makes it a desirable destination for those seeking year-round warmth. While this region hosts world-renowned events and is unlikely to lose popularity anytime soon, a study warns that rapidly rising temperatures are threatening the

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Amazon’s palm reader offers a new way to pay at stores

amazon-one

Palm reading has arrived at two Amazon Go stores.


Amazon

Amazon already got rid of checkout lines at its brick-and-mortar Amazon Go stores. Now it wants to make getting into those stores easier too. Last week, the retail giant started letting people use its latest biometric tech — a palm reader dubbed Amazon One — to enter two Amazon Go locations in Seattle. Amazon unveiled the new tech ahead of its annual Prime Day shopping event, which will take place Oct. 13-14 this year.

“Amazon One is a fast, convenient, contactless way for people to use their palm to make everyday activities like paying at a store, presenting a loyalty card, entering a location like a stadium, or badging into work more effortless,” Dilip Kumar, Amazon’s vice president of physical retail and technology, said Sept. 29 in a blog post. “The service is designed to be highly secure

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New Amazon One Lets You Use Your Palm to Make Payments

Amazon announced a new payment technology on Tuesday, which uses the palm of your hand instead of plastic or cash. While the Amazon One palm scanners have some traction—the company says it’s actively discussing expanding the technology with several potential customers—privacy concerns may be a roadblock to widespread adoption.

Key Takeaways

  • Amazon One is a new form of contactless payment technology that scans your palm to identify you. 
  • The e-commerce giant plans to test its Amazon One palm scanners at two of its physical stores in Seattle.
  • Some details remain unclear, but privacy concerns could be a major obstacle to widespread adoption.

How the Amazon One Technology Works

Biometric authentication has been around for years. Most consumers are familiar with the facial or fingerprint recognition technology they can use to unlock their phones. 

Amazon One’s payment technology uses proprietary algorithms to scan the unique features below the surface of a

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Our first-hand experience with Amazon’s new palm reader, and what it says about the future of retail

Entering the Amazon Go store by scanning my palm. (GeekWire Photo / Todd Bishop)

What if grabbing a drink from the store was as easy as getting one from your fridge?

Amazon is approaching that level of frictionless commerce with its new Amazon One palm-reading biometric identification system, especially when combined with its existing checkout-free retail infrastructure. Convenience for consumers means more cash in Amazon’s account, and for better or worse, this one-two technological punch could help the tech giant put more shoppers in the palm of its hands.

Those are some of my takeaways after experiencing the technology at one of the two Amazon Go convenience stores where it debuted Tuesday in Seattle.

Without pulling anything from my pocket to identify myself or pay — no need to unlock a smartphone, or fish a credit card from a wallet — going from storefront to shelf to sidewalk easily took

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Amazon sees broad audience for its palm recognition tech

SEATTLE (AP) — Amazon has introduced new palm recognition technology in a pair of Seattle stores and sees a broader potential audience in stadiums, offices and other gated or secured locations.

Customers at the stores near Amazon’s campus in Washington can flash a palm for entry into secured areas and buy goods.

The company chose palm recognition, according to Dilip Kumar, vice president of Physical Retail & Technology, because it’s more private than other biometric technology, and a person would be required to purposefully flash a palm at the Amazon One device to engage.

“And it’s contactless, which we think customers will appreciate, especially in current times,” Kumar wrote in a blog post Tuesday.


Like the human fingerprint, every palm is unique. Unlike fingerprints, the palm is not used for broader identification purposes because more body specific information is needed. Any palm image proffered for use is never stored on

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Amazon Pitches New Palm Scanning Tech For Stadiums, Offices As Consumer Privacy Concerns Linger

Topline

New technology announced Tuesday by Amazon that allows the palm of a user’s hand to double as a credit card or company ID could find its way into use in office buildings and sports stadiums, according to the e-commerce giant, which said it chose the palm technology because it’s “more private” than other biometric markers as consumers continue to have concerns over data privacy and big tech.

Key Facts

The technology, called Amazon One, uses custom-built algorithms and hardware to create a person’s unique “palm signature,” allowing for everything from making credit card or loyalty card purchases to entering a location like a stadium, or badging

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Amazon sees its palm recognition tech in stadiums, offices

Amazon is introducing new palm recognition technology in a pair of Seattle stores and sees broader uses in places like stadiums and offices

SEATTLE — Amazon has introduced new palm recognition technology in a pair of Seattle stores and sees broader uses in places like stadiums and offices.

“And it’s contactless, which we think customers will appreciate, especially in current times,” Kumar wrote in a blog post Tuesday.

The company expects

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Amazon palm payment system Amazon One announced

Amazon One lets users enter some of the company’s stores and buy products with the palm of their hand.

Amazon

Amazon wants to speed up shopping trips by letting users pay with the palm of their hand.

The company on Tuesday launched Amazon One, a new biometric technology that enables shoppers to enter and pay for items at stores by placing their palm over a scanning device. In order for it to work, users first have to connect their palm to a stored credit card. After that, users are able to pay with their hand.

To start, Amazon One will be an entry option at two of its dozens of cashierless Amazon Go stores, located near its Seattle headquarters. Over time, Amazon plans to introduce the technology at more of its physical stores in the coming months. 

Amazon also hopes to sell the palm-scanning technology to other companies like retailers,

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Amazon envisions new palm reading tech in stadiums, offices

Amazon is introducing new palm reading technology in a pair of Seattle stores and sees broader uses in places like stadiums and offices

SEATTLE — Amazon has introduced new palm reading technology in a pair of Seattle stores and sees broader uses in places like stadiums and offices.

“And it’s contactless, which we think customers will appreciate, especially in current times,” Kumar wrote in a blog post Tuesday.

The company expects to roll out Amazon One as an option in

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Amazon One uses your palm to approve store purchases

Amazon is putting contactless payments in the palm of your hand. No, seriously. Today, the company has revealed Amazon One, a service that uses your unique palm signature to authenticate purchases and let you into gated locations, such as offices, gyms and stadiums. For now, palm reading is restricted to two Amazon Go stores — the type that doesn’t require you to interact with a cashier or self-service checkout — in Seattle. You’ll need to ‘enroll’ on your first visit by inserting your credit card and following the scanner’s on-screen instructions. Once your card and palm have been paired, you’ll able to enter the Seattle stores simply by holding your hand above the device “for about a second or so,” according to a blog post.

For now, it feels like a pilot. Amazon has big plans for the technology, though. The company says it will “start” in select Amazon Go

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