the parents in England refusing to send their children back to school

Schools are losing touch with some of the most vulnerable families across England during the pandemic, as the threat of truancy fines leads parents to de-register their children, with many feeling abandoned and isolated.



Photograph: Dan Kitwood/Getty


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Dan Kitwood/Getty

The government has said that parents who do not send their children back to school should face the usual penalties for non-attendance. But, although ministers say missing school would put “a huge dent in children’s life chances”, some families with members suffering from serious health conditions say it is not worth the risk. With headteachers saying they cannot authorise their absences because of the government’s policy, they face fines of between £60 and £2,500 for each parent.

Some heads are demanding letters from doctors to prove families’ health vulnerabilities, causing confusion as GPs say it is not their job to intervene. Education Otherwise, which supports home educators, says

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Study shows automatic enrollment, paired with option to opt-out, is highly effective at boosting parents’ participation — ScienceDaily

Researchers know that texting programs can greatly benefit young children’s literacy. Now new research shows that parents’ participation in such programs can be boosted exponentially with one simple tweak: automatic enrollment, combined with the ability to opt out.

The new research from the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy appears in the Journal of Child and Family Studies.

In recent years, mounting research evidence has shown texting to be an effective, low-cost, scalable approach for engaging parents in their children’s learning. Some studies suggest text message interventions via tips for parents on how to support their child’s development can put young children’s learning 2-3 months ahead.

Yet getting parents to enroll in these beneficial programs can be challenging. With that in mind, researchers designed a study to test strategies for increasing program participation.

In the study, researchers from Duke, New York

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Kid Tech Support Saves Parents $5,000+ Annually

Are you a parent or guardian who is constantly turning to your teenage kids for advice on how to handle social media, email, video editing, security issues, and even full-on graphic design (someone’s got to make the flyer for the bake sale!)? If so, be glad you don’t have to pay for that. Or on average, you’d be shelling out $5,294.54 per year.

In a bit of research undertaken by UK-based specialist IT consultancy Prolifics Testing, it asked 2,664 teens (also in the UK) between 13 and 18 years old how many hours they’ve spent helping parents with various tech tasks in the 12 months between September 2019 and August 2020. Prolifics took the average number of hours and multiplied it by the freelancer rates listed in the job database at UpWork. The result, above, shows how much the kids could have earned if they were paid the same as

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Cheating birds mimic host nestlings to deceive foster parents — ScienceDaily

The common cuckoo is known for its deceitful nesting behaviour — by laying eggs in the nests of other bird species, it fools host parents into rearing cuckoo chicks alongside their own. While common cuckoos mimic their host’s eggs, new research has revealed that a group of parasitic finch species in Africa have evolved to mimic their host’s chicks — and with astonishing accuracy. The study is published in the journal Evolution.

Working in the savannahs of Zambia, a team of international researchers collected images, sounds and videos over four years to reveal a striking and highly specialised form of mimicry. They focused on a group of finches occurring across much of Africa called the indigobirds and whydahs, of the genus Vidua.

Like cuckoos, the 19 different species within this group of finches forego their parental duties and instead lay their eggs in the nests of other birds. Each

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Parents can use Tech to Protect Their Kids’ Future With up to $5 Million (in Minutes)

As parents, we’d do anything to protect our kids’ future, especially when the world is so unpredictable. When you welcome a new family member, your world revolves around their education, upbringing, and teaching life in general right from day one to college and beyond.

As the breadwinner, you might provide everything for your family without straining your budget. But you cannot overlook the pandemic and stay oblivious to how your kids will do if you pass away. The key takeaway from this unending pandemic is that life is fragile, and we should have everything in place in case the worst happens.

Households can be chaotic, especially for new or busy parents. Sometimes you can miss out on must-dos, but you don’t get a pass when it’s about your child’s future. In a world so volatile, you can secure a term life insurance to protect your kids without burning a hole

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Parents’ Guide To Next-Gen Consoles: PS5 And Xbox Series X/S Explained

A new console generation is upon us. If you don’t play video games (or even if you do), navigating the tech and gaming landscapes can feel intimidating, even without the additional questions and confusion prompted by new PlayStation and Xbox systems hitting the market soon. If you’re a prospective buyer, like a parent doing some early holiday shopping, and find yourself in this camp–confused by all the different brands, naming conventions, accessories, and technical details–don’t worry! In this guide, we’ll walk you through what’s currently on the market, break down the key differences between the PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X and Series S, and try to ease some of that gift-buying pressure.

Explaining Next Gen: The PS5 and Xbox Series X

Because of innovations in hardware and other trends and advancements in the game industry, new game consoles often launch around the same time. These periods are referred to

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