Rising nitrous oxide emissions could put Paris Agreement goals out of reach

Oct. 7 (UPI) — Around the world, nitrous oxide emissions are rising, imperiling the effort to meet the climate goals set by the Paris Agreement.

According to a new study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, the growing use of nitrogen fertilizers by industrial agriculture has led to a dramatic increase in N2O emissions.

For the study, researchers analyzed major N2O sources and sinks all over the world. The effort was aided by scientists from 48 research institutions in 14 countries.

“This study presents the most comprehensive and detailed picture to date, of N2O emissions and their impact on climate,” lead study author Parvadha Suntharalingam, climate scientist at the University of East Anglia in Britain, said in a news release.

The data showed modern atmospheric nitrous oxide levels are 20 percent higher than preindustrial levels, increasing to 331 parts per billion in 2018 from 270 parts per billion in 1750.

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Lights, camera, fashion: Chanel show goes ahead as Paris tightens lockdown

Bruno Pavlovsky is in a good mood. It is Monday evening, and the president of Chanel’s fashion division has just received confirmation from the French government that the house’s catwalk show can go ahead the following morning.

The show, staged before 500 masked guests under the glass domes of the Grand Palais on the final day of Paris Fashion Week, had been running against the clock. Earlier on Monday, the French government ordered the closure of all bars and cafés in Paris for two weeks from Tuesday as new coronavirus infections rose to 11,500 daily.

Nevertheless, many fashion houses, including LVMH-owned Louis Vuitton and Dior, have gone ahead with live shows.

“The show is the best way to present the collection,” Pavlovsky insists. The company was forced to cancel its Cruise show in Capri in May, and instead debuted the collection online via video in June. Although it reached an

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Antarctic Ice Sheet to melt, raise sea levels by 8.5 feet even under Paris Agreement

Sept. 23 (UPI) — The Antarctic Ice Sheet will suffer irreversible ice loss raising ocean levels by 8.5 feet even if the world meets global warming goals laid out by the Paris Agreement on Climate change, scientists said in a report published Wednesday.

The analysis determined there are a number of temperature thresholds above pre-industrial levels that will ultimately lead to increasing sea levels if the world’s nations don’t rein in emissions and global warming.

The study, published Wednesday in the journal nature, was conducted by researchers at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research and the University of Potsdam in Germany, Columbia University in New York City, and Stockholm University in Sweden.

The researchers determined that if global warming is maintained at 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels — as laid out by the Paris Agreement — sea levels would rise by 8.5 feet.

If the climate agreement is

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To reach the Paris climate goals, decade-long measures are needed — ScienceDaily

Based on current data measured in the energy, industry, and mobility sectors, restrictions of social life during the corona pandemic can be predicted to lead to a reduction of worldwide carbon dioxide emissions by up to eight percent in 2020. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), cumulative reductions of about this magnitude would be required every year to reach the goals of the Paris Agreement by 2030. Recent measurements by researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) revealed that concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has not yet changed due to the estimated emission reductions. The results are reported in Remote Sensing (DOI: 10.3390/rs12152387).

The corona pandemic has changed both our working and our private lives. People increasingly work from home, have video conferences instead of business trips, and spend their holidays in their home country. The lower traffic volume also reduces CO

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