Researchers confirm the safety of home discharge for low-risk patients with COVID-19 — ScienceDaily

A new study shows that the vast majority of patients who visited the Ruth and Harry Roman Emergency Department at Cedars-Sinai with suspected COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) symptoms, and who were treated and sent home to recuperate, recovered within a week.

The study, published by the Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians Open, showed that none of those patients died from the virus and fewer than 1% required intensive care.

“When the pandemic began there was minimal evidence to guide us as to who should be hospitalized and who could be sent home,” said Sam Torbati, MD, co-chair and medical director of the Ruth and Harry Roman Emergency Department at Cedars-Sinai. “In real time, we began developing our criteria for who needed hospitalization for monitoring, intensive care, and who could recover at home. And this study shows our patients received the appropriate level of care.”

In the retrospective study,

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New England Cancer Specialists will soon offer scalp-cooling technology to help reduce hair loss in cancer patients

By Chiara Battelli MD, President & Lead Physician at New England Cancer Specialists

A cancer diagnosis can change many things about our lives. As patients move forward with their doctor to examine treatment options, one of the major concerns they express is hair loss associated with chemotherapy. Unfortunately, it is hard to predict who will lose their hair even though it is a common and significant side effect of cytotoxic chemotherapy. Studies have shown that hair loss during cancer treatment can lead to lower self-esteem and feelings of depression, ultimately causing up to 10% of patients to forego chemotherapy.

Chemotherapy drugs damage hair follicles in a variety of ways: some drugs cause hair thinning or hair loss only on the scalp, while others can cause hair to thin or fall out on the arms, legs, underarms, eyebrows, or eyelashes. If a person is going to lose hair during treatment, it

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Connecting Chiropractors & Patients Through AI Technology

Chiro Solutions

Chiro Solutions
Chiro Solutions
Chiro Solutions

Latham, NY, Oct. 08, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — As a chiropractor, the goal is to help patients live and feel better; however, in order to provide the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disorders of the neuromusculoskeletal system that many individuals need, they first need to establish the doctor-patient relationship. Many chiropractors are asking how to get more patients the chiropractic services that they really need! Chiro Solutions believes the answer to this dilemma is simple. Establish a medical marketing campaign customized to the individual practice for Inbound Lead Generation combined with AI Technology, a deadly duo.

Chiro Solutions bridges the gap between your practice and the local community with an all-in-one marketing software which attracts, nurtures & books these community members into your busy schedule for care. Over the past year Chiro Solutions has helped chiropractors across the US grow their practices to otherwise

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Data indicates 61 percent of patients who used cannabis began after age 60 — ScienceDaily

With growing interest in its potential health benefits and new legislation favoring legalization in more states, cannabis use is becoming more common among older adults.

University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers report that older adults use cannabis primarily for medical purposes to treat a variety of common health conditions, including pain, sleep disturbances and psychiatric conditions like anxiety and depression.

The study, published online October 7, 2020 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, found that of 568 patients surveyed, 15 percent had used cannabis within the past three years, with half of users reporting using it regularly and mostly for medical purposes.

“Pain, insomnia and anxiety were the most common reasons for cannabis use and, for the most part, patients reported that cannabis was helping to address these issues, especially with insomnia and pain,” said Christopher Kaufmann, PhD, co-first author of the study and

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New technology allows cancer patients to watch movies during radiation

AURORA, Colo. (KDVR) — No matter the age, radiation treatment can be tough on any cancer patient. Which is why UCHealth helped develop a special piece of technology to help reduce anxiety and stress associated with it.

The technology is called ‘RadFlix’ and it allows patients to safely watch their favorite TV shows and movies all while undergoing radiation.

“This can be a very traumatic experience for these kids,” said Dr. Douglas Holt, the Chief Resident radiation oncologist with the University of Colorado Cancer Center.

Holt helped develop the device. It’s a radiation compatible, video distraction system that can be used with any type of radiation treatment.

“That’s important because it’s very technically challenging to do that in radiation,” Holt said.

Not only is it convenient for a patient to watch TV or a movie on ‘RadFlix’ while undergoing radiation therapy, but it also helps them cut down on the

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Surgeons find that shifting to virtual visits could be a way to improve patient-centered care, satisfy busy patients — ScienceDaily

Surgical patients who participate in virtual follow-up visits after their operations spend a similar amount of time with surgical team members as those who meet face-to-face. Moreover, these patients benefit by spending less time waiting at and traveling to the clinic for in-person appointments, according to research findings presented at the virtual American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress 2020.

“I think it’s really valuable for patients to understand that, in the virtual space scenario, they are still going to get quality time with their surgical team,” said lead study author Caroline Reinke, MD, FACS, associate professor of surgery at Atrium Health in Charlotte, N.C. “A virtual appointment does not shorten that time, and there is still an ability to answer questions, connect, and address ongoing medical care.”

Due to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the widespread adoption of technology, many surgical patients are being offered virtual appointments in

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The Challenges In Caring For ‘VIP’ Patients Like President Trump

In the early morning hours of Friday, October 2nd, 2020, the public received word that the President of the United States, Donald J. Trump, tested positive for Covid-19. The health of the president is considered a national security issue. Later in the day, the president was admitted to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. This news was revealed on the heels of over 209,000 deaths and 7.4 million deaths in the U.S. as well as over 1 million deaths and 34.9 million cases worldwide from a highly contagious disease for which we have no cure, no prevention and limited treatment options.

In this case, treating Covid-19 may not be

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In wake of hacker attack, patients need information | Articles

Our wired world unavoidably puts our personal information at potential risk. The points of vulnerability are many: Our home computers. Banks and credit unions. Online retailers. Government agencies.

And medical facilities. Indeed, the health care sector has been regularly a target of hackers across the country. Nebraska has had several examples. Malware, brought in by a third-party vendor’s device, struck a CHI Health location in 2019. The year before, a hacker accessed patient information at Boys Town National Research Hospital.

Last week, Nebraska Medicine became the latest health care facility targeted in our state for cyberattack. The assault — described as a “significant information technology system downtime event” — led the hospital to postpone patient appointments, with staff resorting to old-style charting of medical information.

Nebraska Medicine has since regained its footing in terms of service delivery.

“People have done a yeoman’s job in making sure we deliver good patient

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In study, 15 patients with long-term PD and chronic pain and mobility impairment showed improvements across multiple measures — ScienceDaily

A team of researchers in the United States and Japan reports that spinal cord stimulation (SCS) measurably decreased pain and reduced motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, both as a singular therapy and as a “salvage therapy” after deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapies were ineffective.

Writing in the September 28, 2020 issue of Bioelectronic Medicine, first author Krishnan Chakravarthy, MD, PhD, assistant professor of anesthesiology at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, and colleagues recruited 15 patients with Parkinson’s disease, a neurodegenerative disorder that is commonly characterized by physical symptoms, such as tremors and progressive difficulty walking and talking, and non-motor symptoms, such as pain and mental or behavioral changes.

The mean age of the patients was 74, with an average disease duration of 17 years. All of the patients were experiencing pain not alleviated by previous treatments. Eight had undergone earlier DBS, a non-invasive, pain therapy in

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Light therapy safe and may benefit patients with TBI, study shows — ScienceDaily

Light therapy is safe and has measurable effects in the brain, according to a pioneering study by researchers from the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Senior investigators Rajiv Gupta, MD, PhD, director of the Ultra-High Resolution Volume CT Lab at MGH and Benjamin Vakoc, PhD, at the Wellman Center led the study, which was supported by a grant from the Department of Defense (DOD) and published in JAMA Network Open September 14th.

This study is one of the first, if not the first, prospective, randomized, interventional clinical trials of near-infrared, low-level light therapy (LLLT) in patients who recently suffered a moderate brain injury. If further trials support these findings, light therapy could become the first widely-accepted treatment for this type of injury.

TBI is the leading cause of traumatic injury worldwide, and an estimated 69 million people experience such an injury every year. However, there are

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