Google pledges $1 billion over 3 years to pay news publishers for content

Google has announced a $1 billion investment over three years to start paying news publishers for content and to support the launch of a new product dubbed the “Google News Showcase.”



a screenshot of a computer: Logos for the tech company Google are displayed on computer screens in a picture taken on Nov. 20, 2017.


© Loic Venance/AFP via Getty Images, FILE
Logos for the tech company Google are displayed on computer screens in a picture taken on Nov. 20, 2017.

Sundar Pichai, the CEO of Google parent company Alphabet Inc., announced the move Thursday in a blog post, opening up about “enduring” memories of his father reading the newspaper each morning.

“I have always valued quality journalism and believed that a vibrant news industry is critical to a functioning democratic society,” Pichai wrote.

The chief executive said the $1 billion investment in news publishers is their biggest financial commitment to journalism to date. He said the company is aiming to create a “different kind of online news experience” through the Google News Showcase.

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Google will pay publishers $1 billion to quell claims of unfairly prof

Google has announced a new initiative called Google News Showcase that will pay select publishers for content the showcase is populated with. Currently, Google has set aside $1 billion to pay publishers over the next three years to get the initiative off the ground. In a blog post, Google CEO Sundar Pichai described Showcase as follows:

This financial commitment—our biggest to date—will pay publishers to create and curate high-quality content for a different kind of online news experience. Google News Showcase is a new product that will benefit both publishers and readers: It features the editorial curation of award-winning newsrooms to give readers more insight on the stories that matter, and in the process, helps publishers develop deeper relationships with their audiences.

But the Showcase initiative isn’t an altruistic move on Google’s part. The search giant has come under increasing pressure from publishers and regulators in recent years about the

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Google agrees to pay news publishers $1 billion for content

Oct. 1 (UPI) — Tech giant Google said Thursday it has agreed to pay more than $1 billion to dozens of publishers for news content in the coming years, an answer to complaints that have been made for years by outlets.

Google said a new format, called the News Showcase, will allow publishers to decide what content will be displayed on its search platform.

The company said it will also pay some of the content producers to include premium articles at no cost to readers.

Google’s agreement will pay producers more than $1 billion over three years and will begin immediately.

“This financial commitment — our biggest to date — will pay publishers to create and curate high-quality content for a different kind of online news experience,” Google CEO Sundar Pichai said in a statement.

“This approach is distinct from our other news products because it leans on the editorial

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Google to Pay Publishers Over $1 Billion for News Content

(Bloomberg) — Alphabet Inc.’s Google will start paying select media outlets to display curated content on its news app in a concession to the industry which has accused the search engine and other tech giants of unfairly using content for years.



logo: The Google logo is displayed on a wall at the Google Playspace at CES 2020 in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2020. Google said its digital assistant is used by more than 500 million people every month.


© Bloomberg
The Google logo is displayed on a wall at the Google Playspace at CES 2020 in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2020. Google said its digital assistant is used by more than 500 million people every month.

The company has set aside more than $1 billion to cover the program’s first three years, and will extend the program beyond that, Google said in a statement on Thursday. The search giant will pay publishers to provide blurbs for its news app and to give readers free access to certain paywalled articles, Google said.

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The Google News Showcase product, which launches Thursday in Brazil

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Google agrees to pay news publishers more than $1 billion

Google will pay publishers more than $1 billion over the next three years through a new program for licensing news.



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© SIN1980/Shutterstock


The tech giant has signed licensing deals with about 200 publications in select countries with plans to add more and expand geographically.

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Google, along with Facebook, controls a large share of the advertising dollars that once went to publishers in the news industry. Shrinking ad revenue has led to smaller newsrooms and diminishing resources for telling local stories. The billion dollar spend on licensing news is Google’s way of showing publishers it is committed to paying for high quality journalism and sustaining a struggling industry.

The licensing deals, previously announced in June, are part of a new product called News Showcase, where participating publishers can curate and decide for themselves how to present their content on the platform. The content is displayed as a “story panel,”

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Businesses Could Pay $1 Trillion Biodiversity Bill

As the United Nations Summit on Biodiversity meets on Wednesday, governments and businesses are being urged to commit to ambitious new targets.

“We have failed to meet any of the biodiversity targets we set in Japan 10 years ago,” UN Secretary General António Guterres told the virtual Leaders’ Pledge for Nature on Monday. “We need a new biodiversity framework.”

The new framework the UN Convention on Biological Diversity has in mind is to place 30% of the Earth’s surface under conservation status by 2030. This would almost double the amount of land and sea currently under protection.

On Monday, prime ministers of the U.K. and Canada, Boris Johnson and Justin Trudeau, said their countries would commit to protecting 30% of their land and sea by 2030.

Others are expected to follow suit on Wednesday (30 September) as leaders meet virtually for the United Nations Summit on

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Seattle approves minimum pay rate for Uber and Lyft drivers

(Reuters) – The Seattle City Council passed a minimum pay standard for drivers for companies like Uber Technologies Inc UBER.N and Lyft Inc LYFT.O on Tuesday.

Under the ordinance, effective January, the drivers will now earn at least $16.39 per hour – the minimum wage in Seattle for companies with more than 500 employees.

Seattle’s law, modeled after a similar regulation in New York City, aims to reduce the amount of time drivers spend “cruising” without a passenger by paying drivers more during those times.

City officials argue this should prevent Uber and Lyft from oversaturating the market at drivers’ expense, but the companies say it would effectively force them to block some drivers access to the app. Both Uber and Lyft have locked out drivers in response to the NYC law.

“The City’s plan is deeply flawed and will actually destroy jobs for thousands of people — as many

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Pay with your palm? Amazon unveils biometric ID, touting convenience and testing customer trust

The Amazon One palm-scanning biometric ID system will roll out initially as an option for customers when they check in to two Amazon Go convenience stores in Seattle. (Amazon Photo)

Amazon has developed a new biometric ID system that works by scanning the palms of participating customers, planning to ultimately let people make in-store payments, gain access to office buildings, and move quickly through stadium turnstiles by holding out a hand.

The system, called “Amazon One,” comes with numerous safeguards designed to protect user data. Even so, Amazon’s use of biometrics in stores and other commercial settings promises to attract scrutiny at a time of heightened awareness of digital security and privacy, testing the limits of customer trust in the company.

Amazon One is set to debut Tuesday at two Amazon Go convenience stores near the company’s Seattle headquarters, giving customers an alternative to the regular process of checking into

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Confidential information released after school district refused to pay hackers’ ransom demand, report says

Hackers may have gained access to confidential information about current and former staff and students of the fifth largest school district in the United States, according to a statement posted on the district’s website.



a school bus is parked on the side of a road: Hackers compromised confidential information from past and present staff and students of Clark County School District (CCSD), according to a statement posted on the school's website.


© Shutterstock
Hackers compromised confidential information from past and present staff and students of Clark County School District (CCSD), according to a statement posted on the school’s website.

The Clark County School District (CCSD) in Las Vegas reopened for in-person learning on August 24. It was attacked by hackers three days later in an incident first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

On the morning of August 27, according to the statement, certain computer systems from CCSD became infected with a virus that prohibited access to certain files. The Wall Street Journal reports that hackers published documents containing Social Security numbers, student grades and other private information from CCSD students and staff after officials refused

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Pay Higher CPMs, Get Better Outcomes

Marketers have been chasing lower CPM (cost per thousand) prices, particularly in programmatic channels, thinking that leads to greater “efficiency” in their digital ad spending. That is wrong and it’s just a race to the bottomless pit of ad fraud and adtech middlemen taking a greater and greater share of every dollar spent by the marketer.

Real, mainstream publishers with real reporters and editors create real content for real human audiences. They cannot afford to sell ad impressions at very low prices. But fake sites and app publishers can afford to sell ads at very low CPMs because they have no cost of content and low operating costs — think piracy sites, bot generated sites, etc. Those bot generated sites have no human audiences because they don’t need humans. They just use bot traffic to create billions of impressions to sell through programmatic exchanges to unsuspecting advertisers.

Marketers have even

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