Many things to many people: Panasonic launches DC-BGH1 modular ‘box’ camera: Digital Photography Review

Panasonic has announced a new Micro Four Thirds video camera, the Lumix DC-BGH1. This box-style camera is built around a 10.2MP Live MOS sensor. Based on specs, the BGH1 might appear to be essentially a Panasonic GH5S minus the screen and controls, and to some degree, it is. Still, Panasonic has included several features that are rather interesting.

The aluminum and magnesium alloy body is relatively small, at 93mm per side and 78mm deep (3.66 x 3.07 inches). Notably, the camera lacks both a viewfinder and a screen but includes eleven 1/4″-20 sockets for mounting accessories or a tripod. An integrated fan and internal heat dispersion system allow for unlimited record times, and a hot shoe mount on top of the camera can be used to mount a microphone or Panasonic’s DMW-XLR1 XLR adapter.

Camera controls include a dial with a four-way controller on top, several dedicated function buttons and

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Thousands of people want to be exposed to coronavirus for science



a close up of a glass with a blue background: Coronavirus Vaccine


© Provided by BGR
Coronavirus Vaccine

  • Coronavirus vaccine research is advancing at an incredible pace, with some of the first results expected by the end of the year.
  • The UK government is actively exploring the idea of starting a challenge trial where volunteers would receive the experimental drug and then the virus.
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) already cleared the controversial testing method, but governments and vaccine makers are still reluctant to embark on research that would expose volunteers to a deadly pathogen.
  • Tens of thousands of people have signed up for challenge trials nonetheless.

There’s hope that vaccines combined with continued precautions (social distancing, hand washing, and face masks) can defeat the COVID-19 pandemic by the end of 2021. While we have no definitive proof that vaccines are effective and safe, there’s plenty of promising evidence to keep the hope alive. First of all, there are hundreds of coronavirus

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Osteoarthritis biomarker could help 300 million people worldwide — ScienceDaily

Using new state-of-the-art imaging techniques to identify signs of osteoarthritis (OA), UniSA scientists are learning more about changes at the molecular level which indicate the severity of cartilage damage.

A study led by PhD student Olivia Lee and her supervisor Associate Professor Paul Anderson using mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has mapped complex sugars on OA cartilage, showing different sugars are associated with damaged tissue compared to healthy tissue.

The finding will potentially help overcome one of the main challenges of osteoarthritis research — identifying why cartilage degrades at different rates in the body.

“Despite its prevalence in the community, there is a lot about osteoarthritis that we don’t understand,” Prof Anderson says.

“It is one of the most common degenerative joint diseases, yet there are limited diagnostic tools, few treatment options and no cure.”

Existing OA biomarkers are still largely focused on bodily fluids which are neither reliable nor sensitive

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To protect nature’s benefits, focus on people — ScienceDaily

To calculate the true value of a forest, we need to know how people benefit from it, according to new research published in Nature Sustainability. A healthy forest holds a treasure trove of benefits for people — it can filter water for downstream communities, supply timber for building, and provide a place for people to connect with nature. But a forest — or any other ecosystem — won’t necessarily provide the same things to everyone.

“Context matters,” says Lisa Mandle, lead scientist at the Stanford Natural Capital Project and lead author on the paper. “If we want to protect the critical natural assets we all depend on, we need actionable policies that incorporate people’s diverse needs. It shouldn’t be a one-size-fits-all approach when we’re talking about people and nature.”

There’s a growing global movement to invest in nature in order to protect vital resources and improve climate resilience. But

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Science Says Stop Infecting Other People With the ‘Better-Than-Average’ Effect

You’re probably familiar with the famous survey where more than 80 percent of respondents said they were above-average drivers, even though that’s mathematically impossible. And even though all of the respondents had, at some point in their lives, been injured in car accidents. (In fact, another study found that less than 1 percent of respondents considered themselves “worse than average.”)

Findings like that are easy to laugh at… until you realize that most people think they’re above-average at almost everything. A meta-analysis of a number of studies shows that people rate themselves as above average in creativity, intelligence, dependability, athleticism, honesty, friendless… provide people with a survey about almost any trait and teh vast majority will rate themselves as above average.

Social psychologists call it the “better-than-average effect.” Ask me to rate myself — in anything — in terms of basically anything, and I’ll be convinced I’m above average. (Even

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Digital banking means better banking for billions of people

Banks with a platform that allows them to adapt to continuous change will be able to make banking better for billions more people and also help de-risk economies.

Banking today is unrecognizably better for hundreds of millions of people than it was even 10 years ago. In 2010, payments took days instead of minutes to clear; no one had heard of a banking app, let alone installed one on their phone; retail banks relied on high-street branches; fraud mitigation was manual, based on rules; and data was heavily siloed in departments, slowing decisions and stopping it from being used to reduce risk.

Some of the ways in which banking has changed are trivial: I once queued for hours to open an account and had to send a fax to reset a pin code; today that can all be done online in minutes. Some changes are more fundamental, such as the

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Bill Gates Learned at an Early Age This Lesson That Takes Most People a Lifetime. Some People Never Do

You can say what you want about Bill Gates, but it would be hard to argue that he hasn’t experienced success. He’s one of the wealthiest people on earth, having co-founded one of the world’s most valuable companies. He now spends his time giving away all of that money to causes like eradicating polio. His is not a bad resume. 

A lot of that accomplishment comes from a simple lesson Bill Gates learned early on in his life. I think it’s worth looking at, especially since it’s something many people take a lifetime to learn, if they ever do at all.

Most of us assume that it is, which means everything that isn’t success must be failure. But the opposite of success isn’t failure. Or, it doesn’t have to be. And, that’s a distinction that can make all the difference. Unfortunately, it’s one that many people never learn to make.

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Into the Mother Lands interview: Twitch invests in an RPG show led by people of color

Critical Role has played an important roll in the rise of actual play RPG livestreams and podcasts, turning these from a niche to a major player in the streaming ecosystem. According to measurement firm StreamElements, viewers watched an aggregated 19.5 million hours of such shows on Twitch an YouTube, a 1,142% increase over 2018. 2020’s numbers are likely higher.

And one of the best of these actual play shows is Rivals of Waterdeep, a Wizards of the Coast-backed project. It started in 2018 in conjunction with Dungeons & DragonsWaterdeep: Dragon Heist storyline. It’s now in its 8th season, and the project features some of what I consider the deepest role-playing you can find in any D&D show.

Tanya DePass is one of the Rivals‘ players. And she’s teaming up with B. Dave Walters, whose credits include the transmedia Electropunk project, A Darkened Wish (an actual play

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Trump doesn’t respect science, or the American people

  • The president ridiculed safety precautions, held a superspreader event, contracted COVID, was hospitalized, is now back at the White House, and the American public has no idea if he’s even been tested, much less if he’s still contagious.
  • Trump said COVID will “miraculously” disappear and rejected the reality of climate change, saying “It will start getting cooler, just you watch.”
  • He thinks basic science doesn’t apply to him and the results of his COVID tests are none of our business. That’s a threat to Americans’ lives.
  • This is an opinion column. The thoughts expressed are those of the author.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump has brazenly flouted even the simplest of COVID-19 safety precautions and encouraged others to do the same. On his watch, the White House became the hotspot responsible for a surge in DC-area COVID cases. 

And even after it became clear that

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Kelly Ripa: I want to work behind the camera | People



Kelly Ripa: I want to work behind the camera

Kelly Ripa wants to quit presenting to move behind the camera.

The 50-year-old television host is best known for presenting ‘Live! with Kelly and Ryan’ alongside Ryan Seacrest, but has said she “eventually” wants to step back from hosting the daytime television program to instead “work behind the camera” as a writer.

She said: “I’ve been writing a lot. So my goal ultimately would be to eventually get off camera and start working behind the camera more in that creative aspect because I really do enjoy the writing process so much.”

But Kelly has admitted she doesn’t want to walk away from her show just yet, as she’s having too much fun presenting alongside Ryan.

She added to Parade magazine: “I talk about this with Ryan all the time because I was really looking to retire like by now, but Ryan Seacrest is so fabulous to work with and he

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