Chemical Segment to Present Lucrative Opportunities in Air Separation Plants Market, China to Exhibit Promising Growth

Owing to the increased adoption of air separation plants in chemical, healthcare and food industry, revenue is set to steer up tremendously through 2029.

DUBAI, UAE / ACCESSWIRE / October 12, 2020 / The air separation plant market expected to surpass US$ 4870.6 million by 2029 as a part of which China and India is expected to witness a positive graph for the demand and production of air separation plants market. Due to increasing demand in major industries, manufacturers are working on developing on-site customized plant systems to gain a steady growth.

“Among the others, though chemical industry will hold maximum share, it will not outsell other major industries. It will surely dominate the market and will hold a considerable share but customized side of it will help the profit rise tremendously. Manufacturers are also focussing on better utilization of resources, raw materials and decreasing labour cost to enhance revenue

Read More
Read More

Research may curb economic losses to power plants after earthquakes — ScienceDaily

Sitting atop power transformers are wavy shaped bushing systems that play a critical role in supplying communities with electricity. However, these objects are also susceptible to breaking during earthquakes. Once damaged, bushings can cause widespread outages and burden the state with expensive repairs.

In a recent study, Texas A&M University researchers have shown that during high seismic activity, the structural integrity of bushing systems can be better maintained by reinforcing their bases with steel stiffeners. Also, by using probability-based loss assessment studies, they found that the economic burden due to damage to bushing systems from earthquakes is up to 10 times lower for steel-reinforced transformer bushing systems compared to other bushing configurations.

“Transformer bushing systems are vital to electrical substation networks, and these components are especially vulnerable in high-seismic regions, like in California or parts of the northeast,” said Dr. Maria Koliou, assistant professor in the Zachry Department of Civil

Read More
Read More

210 scientists highlight state of plants and fungi in Plants, People, Planet special issue

210 scientists highlight state of plants and fungi in Plants, People, Planet special issue
Five broad themes that encompass the State of the World’s Plants and Fungi report 2020 are featured in this stylised illustration. (a) Resources for exploring plant and fungal properties; (b) The influence of global biodiversity policy; (c) Unlocking the useful properties of plants and fungi; (d) UK and UK Overseas Territories; (e) New insights into global knowledge of plants and fungi. Credit: Plants, People, Planet

The Special Issue, ‘Protecting and sustainably using the world’s plants and fungi’, brings together the research—from 210 scientists across 42 countries—behind the 2020 State of the World’s Plants and Fungi report, also released today by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.


This is the first time that over 200 scientists have come together and collaborated to deliver a vital update, not only on the status of the world’s plant life, but also the world’s fungi. Humanity’s existence and well-being depends on plants and fungi—from our food

Read More
Read More

Researchers find new way to protect plants from fungal infection — ScienceDaily

Widespread fungal disease in plants can be controlled with a commercially available chemical that has been primarily used in medicine until now. This discovery was made by scientists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the University of the State of Paraná in Brazil. In a comprehensive experiment the team has uncovered a new metabolic pathway that can be disrupted with this chemical, thus preventing many known plant fungi from invading the host plant. The team reported on their study in the scientific journal Phytopathology.

The fungus Colletotrichum graminicola is prevalent around the world. It infects maize, causing anthracnose, a disease that causes the plant’s leaves to turn yellow at first and then ultimately to succumb to toxins. The fungus multiplies through spores that initially land on the surface of the plant. There they find rather inhospitable conditions: a lack of most of the nutrients that fungi need to

Read More
Read More