Rare Peacock Stars Could Potentially Detonate Deadly Gamma Rays In The Milky Way [Video]

KEY POINTS

  • Gamma-ray bursts are one of the most energetic occurrences in the universe
  • Apep’s two stars are 10 to 15 times more massive and 100,000 times brighter than the Sun
  • The two stars also orbit each other about every 125 years

Apep, one of the Wolf-Rayets binary star systems dubbed as the “exotic peacocks of the stellar world” discovered in 2018, was found to have the capacity to detonate long gamma ray bursts that are potentially deadly. If it detonates, the explosion could be something never seen in the Milky Way before, according to scientists.

“As well as exhibiting all the usual extreme behavior of Wolf-Rayets, Apep’s main star looks to be rapidly rotating. This means it could have all the ingredients to detonate a long gamma-ray burst when it goes supernova,” Peter Tuthill, study lead and professor from the University of Sydney, said in a press release. 

In

Read More
Read More

The DeanBeat: What’s at stake in Apple’s potentially apocalyptic IDFA changes

The Identifier for Advertisers, also known as IDFA, seems like an unlikely candidate for causing an apocalypse in mobile games, advertising, and the iPhone ecosystem. But the obscure tracking technology, which anonymously profiles a user, seems like Death riding in on a pale horse.

Starting in June, Apple caused a stir by saying it was effectively getting rid of the IDFA, making it harder for advertisers to target consumers with ads. Apple’s plan was to enhance privacy, but it caused a great stir among the likes of Facebook, mobile marketers, and their customers such as game developers. Apple did this without widespread consultation with the app and game industry.

By getting rid of the IDFA, Apple could make its platform more attractive to those who value privacy, consistent with the latest privacy-marketing ads for its iPhones and iPad. But the uproar from Apple’s partners forced Apple to delay its move

Read More
Read More

‘AirPods Studio’ launch potentially pushed to November, leaker says

Apple’s manufacturing partners will reportedly have an initial batch of “AirPods Studio” headphones ready by the end of October, according to new information from leaker Jon Prosser.

The avid leaker, who has a hit-or-miss track record in predicting future Apple product launches, sites an anonymous source as saying mass production of the rumored high-end headphones will “complete” by Oct. 20.

“AirPods Studio mass production isn’t complete until October 20th,” Prosser said in a tweet, quoting a person supposedly familiar with Apple’s plans. “I suppose they could still announce them at the October 13th event and ship them at the end of this month or beginning of next.”

It is unclear what manufacturing timeline the source is referencing, as mass production of Apple products — and consumer products in general — is never truly finished until a device is no longer for sale. While not specified, it can be

Read More
Read More

NASA satellite’s dazzling panorama hides 74 exoplanets (and potentially hundreds more)

tess-north-hires-azeq-no-labels-medium

This panorama of the northern sky is composed of 208 images taken by TESS in the second year of its mission.


NASA/MIT/TESS and Ethan Kruse (USRA)

A series of 208 images captured by NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) over one year reveal a dazzling sea of stars and 74 exoplanets in the northern sky, the space agency said in a release Monday. TESS has now imaged around 75% of the sky over two years. The planet-hunter wrapped up its second year of science operations in July. 

Astronomers are looking through another 1,200 exoplanet candidates to confirm whether new worlds exist there. More than half of those candidates are in the northern sky, NASA says.

TESS pinpoints planets by monitoring several stars simultaneously over large chunks of the sky and keeping watch for any

Read More
Read More

These systems could potentially overcome computational hurdles faced by current digital technologies — ScienceDaily

In the September issue of the journal Nature, scientists from Texas A&M University, Hewlett Packard Labs and Stanford University have described a new nanodevice that acts almost identically to a brain cell. Furthermore, they have shown that these synthetic brain cells can be joined together to form intricate networks that can then solve problems in a brain-like manner.

“This is the first study where we have been able to emulate a neuron with just a single nanoscale device, which would otherwise need hundreds of transistors,” said Dr. R. Stanley Williams, senior author on the study and professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. “We have also been able to successfully use networks of our artificial neurons to solve toy versions of a real-world problem that is computationally intense even for the most sophisticated digital technologies.”

In particular, the researchers have demonstrated proof of concept that their brain-inspired system

Read More
Read More

Experts Predict Where ‘Murder Hornets’ May Potentially Spread

KEY POINTS

  • Asian giant hornets were spotted in the U.S. for the first time in late 2019
  • Experts predicted where the species could spread if they’re left unchecked
  • Parts of the U.S. and other countries were found to be susceptible to an invasion

A team of scientists has predicted where the Asian giant hornet could possibly spread, highlighting the importance of the efforts to keep the species in check.

There were reports earlier this year about Asian giant hornets (Vespa mandarinia), nicknamed “murder hornets”, being spotted in the country for the first time in Washington, causing panic among people.

Now, a team of researchers predicted where the species could actually spread in the U.S. and globally given the right conditions, and if left unchecked.

For the study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team examined records of the species’ native habitat in Japan, Taiwan and

Read More
Read More

Facebook prepares for a potentially ‘chaotic’ election aftermath

Clegg didn’t offer specifics on the plans, or what might trigger these “break-glass options.” But he suggested that the company might consider “pretty exceptional measures to significantly restrict the circulation of content on our platform.” He pointed out the company has taken such steps in other countries in the past, including Sri Lanka and Myanmar (where Facebook’s early inaction against hate speech has been credited with inflaming tensions that resulted in genocide). 

Separately, another source told the paper that the social network is considering “about 70” scenarios, and that it’s working with “world-class military scenario planners.” Clegg, Sheryl Sandberg and Mark Zuckerberg would be among the executives deciding when to put these plans in motion. 

Facebook has been repeatedly criticized for not acting quickly enough to fight disinformation on its platform. The company has been battling a wave of rumors and misinformation about the coronavirus pandemic, which is expected to

Read More
Read More