How Kukri Snakes Kill | These Snakes Can Devour the Insides of Prey

  • Researchers have published a new paper describing the downright vicious way kukri snakes take down some of their prey—in this case, Asian black-spotted toads.
  • The kukri, who uses specialized teeth to create a gash in the body of the toad, destroys its prey by pulling its viscera out and consuming it creating a truly gruesome way to go.

    In a straight up savage move, small-banded kukri snakes (Oligodon fasciolatus) native to Thailand have been spotted literally tearing into Asian black-spotted toads and eating their viscera while the toads are still alive.

    🐍You love awesome animals. So do we. Let’s nerd out over them together.

    This “unknown feeding mode” has both fascinated and horrified researchers who have witnessed the phenomenon first-hand and published their findings in the journal Herpetozoa this September. According to the paper, the researchers analyzed three separate cases in which O. fasciolatus was seen

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    18-Foot Python Devours Large Prey Before Villagers, Rescue Caught On Camera

    KEY POINTS

    • Villagers spotted the unusual sight and immediately alerted the forest department
    • By the time the officers could arrive at the scene, the reptile had already devoured the animal
    • Python was rescued and released into the wild

    A huge python was rescued after it devoured a large prey in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh on Sunday.

    Villagers gathered at the scene after they spotted the 18-foot-long python attempting to swallow an animal, which is believed to be a goat. The villagers immediately alerted the forest department, however, by the time the officers could arrive at the scene, the reptile had already devoured the animal.

    A video of the rescue showed the bloated python unable to move after swallowing its prey. The officers and the villagers then tied a rope around the reptile and pull it toward a truck. The reptile is then raised from the ground using logs

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    Researchers concerned about prey and predator species in post-fire logging areas

    UBCO researchers concerned about prey and predator species in post-fire logging areas
    UBCO researchers say post-fire salvage logging destroys removes important regenerating habitat for a variety of species including the snowshoe hare. Credit: Angelina Kelly.

    New research from UBC Okanagan shows that salvage logging on land damaged by wildfires has negative impacts on a variety of animals.


    While post-fire salvage logging is used to mitigate economic losses following wildfire, Karen Hodges, a biology professor in the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science, says the compounded effects of wildfire and post-fire salvage logging are more severe than what wildlife experience from fire alone.

    Wildfires have been increasing in prevalence and severity in recent decades, Hodges says, and salvaging trees after a fire is a common practice. However, the scale and intensity of post-fire logging removes important regenerating habitat for a variety of forest species.

    “When trees are removed from a newly burned landscape, birds and mammals lose the last remnants of habitat,” she

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