90% of consumers ages 18-24 are willing to share smartphone data if privacy protections are offered

Market Snapshot analyzes consumer research on attitudes on data sharing and personal experiences with COVID-19

DALLAS, Oct. 13, 2020reports among heads of US broadband households ages 18-24, 90% are willing to share smartphone data if privacy protections are offered. In contrast, just over 63% of those age 65+ are willing to share data.

Higher income households and those with higher levels of education are also more likely than lower income households and those with lower educational attainment to share their data.

“As COVID-19 continues to spread, more people will know someone who has contracted COVID-19, which will likely increase their willingness to share smartphone data,” said Jennifer Kent, Senior Director, Parks Associates. “Already 93% of US broadband households report lifestyle changes to limit the spread of the disease, so smartphone data in aid of contact tracing gives consumers an opportunity to take an active role in combating the virus.”

Consumers’

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How To Protect Your Privacy Online In 8 Tips : Life Kit : NPR

Your tech is watching you.

Jackie Ferrentino for NPR

Your tech is watching you.

Jackie Ferrentino for NPR

Before I became a reporter at NPR, I worked for a few years at tech companies.

One of the companies was in the marketing technology business — the industry that’s devoted in part to tracking people and merging their information, so they can be advertised to more effectively.

That tracking happens in multiple senses: Physical tracking, because we carry our phones everywhere we go. And virtual tracking, of all the places we go online.

The more I understood how my information was being collected, shared and sold, the more I wanted to protect my privacy. But it’s still hard to know which of my efforts are actually effective and which are a waste of time.

So I reached out to experts in digital security and privacy to find out what they do to protect their stuff – and what they recommend most

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Amazon One is the company’s latest product to raise privacy concerns

Amazon announced a new palm-recognition system last week that lets people shop in two of its Amazon Go stores by scanning their palm at the entrance. The store automatically tracks what products they pick up and then charges the credit card associated with their hand.

It’s the latest in a long line of product announcements from the company to raise privacy or security concerns while selling its vision of an automated, frictionless future.

Called Amazon One, the palm-scanning system is only in two Go stores in Seattle at the moment. But with the massive online retailer behind it, it has the potential to become a standard form of payment or even identification. Amazon’s plan is to start selling it as a service to other companies, like retail stores, office buildings that use ID badges to get in and out, or stadiums that require tickets for events.

The week before, the

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Prop 24, the California Privacy Rights Act Receives Support From 77% Of Likely California Voters

Prop 24, the California Privacy Rights Act Receives Support From 77% Of Likely California Voters

PR Newswire

SACRAMENTO, Calif., Oct. 6, 2020

SACRAMENTO, Calif., Oct. 6, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Today the YES on Prop 24 campaign released polling results from Goodwin Simon Strategic Research showing that voters continue to overwhelmingly support Prop 24, the California Privacy Rights Act on the November ballot, with 77% of likely voters saying they will vote YES on the ballot measure.

Yes on Privacy, Yes on Prop 24 (PRNewsfoto/Californians for Consumer Priva)
Yes on Privacy, Yes on Prop 24 (PRNewsfoto/Californians for Consumer Priva)

Voters are demanding privacy rights and that’s exactly what we’re giving them in Prop 24- that’s why it has 77% support.

Even more telling is that despite negative campaigning by the opposition, only 11% of voters oppose the measure – the same number as when the last poll was taken in July.

“It’s crystal clear that voters are demanding privacy rights, and

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Facebook CFO says personalized advertising ‘under assault’ by Apple privacy changes

Business models that rely on personalized advertising are “under assault” by iOS 14 privacy changes, Facebook’s chief revenue officer said Tuesday.

The changes include a new feature that requires users to opt-in to tracking via Identifier for Advertiser, or IDFA, tags on a per-app basis. Although initially planned for the general iOS 14 release, Apple delayed the rollout of the feature until 2021 following public outcry from a number of companies that gain a bulk of their revenue from ad serving, including Facebook.

Speaking digitally at Advertising Week on Tuesday, Facebook CFO David Fischer said that “the very tools that entrepreneurs, that businesses are relying on right now are being threatened,” CNBC reported.

“To me, the changes that Apple has proposed, pretty sweeping changes, are going to hurt developers and businesses the most,” Fischer added, singling out the IDFA change in iOS.

The Facebook executive also said that the company

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Big Tech quiet in data privacy initiative fight

Proposition 24 on the November ballot is pitched as an expansion of California’s already robust consumer data privacy law, an iron cuff on the claws of companies that profit handsomely from tracking and selling your online search, travel and purchase habits to marketers.

But the technology giants seemingly square in its sights — the likes of Facebook, Amazon and Google — haven’t shown up to the battlefield. Instead, those opposing the new California Privacy Rights Act are some of the same types of consumer, labor and civil rights advocates who support its predecessor.

“Proposition 24 is a wolf in sheep’s clothing,” said Richard Holober, president of the Consumer Federation of California and a leader of the No on 24 effort. “It’s loaded with giveaways to tech companies.”

Not so, said Alastair Mactaggart, the East Bay real estate developer who spurred California’s adoption two years ago of the country’s toughest data

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Andrew Yang takes lead in California data privacy measure

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The Fitbits on our wrists collect our health and fitness data; Apple promises privacy but lots of iPhone apps can still share our personal information; and who really knows what they’re agreeing to when a website asks, “Do You Accept All Cookies?” Most people just click “OK” and hope for the best, says former Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang.

“The amount of data we’re giving up is unprecedented in human history,” says Yang, who lives in New York but is helping lead the campaign for a data privacy initiative on California’s Nov. 3 ballot. “Don’t you think it’s time we did something about it?”

Yang is chairing the advisory board for Proposition 24, which he and other supporters see as a model for other states as the U.S. tries to catch up with protections that already exist in Europe.

The California Privacy Rights Act of 2020

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For better privacy, keep the cookies in Firefox browser’s containers

Q: We have a family need to create Facebook accounts for ourselves to enable contact with certain relatives.  We are loath to do this. I just don’t trust Facebook very much.

We use Firefox as our browser and have it set to delete cookies upon exit. We also have the DuckDuckGo browser add-on, which at least blocks trackers.

I see Firefox has a Containers add-on where designated web sites are launched in a “protected” environment. Cookies and such will be loaded in an isolated space then deleted upon exit from the site.

Do you have any info or opinion on this containers feature?

— Alan Caswell, Seattle

A: You sound like me.

Yes, I like Firefox’s Multi-Account Containers. Here’s why.

Cookies can make web browsing easier and a lot more efficient. When you revisit a website, the data stored in a cookie may be used to customize the site according

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France’s Data Privacy Watchdog Beefs up Consent Rights Over Ad Trackers | Technology News

PARIS (Reuters) – France’s data privacy watchdog CNIL recommended on Thursday that websites operating in the country should keep a register of internet users’ refusal to accept online trackers known as cookies for at least six months.

In specifying a registration timeframe, the guideline goes beyond European Union-wide data privacy rules adopted two years ago, adding an extra hurdle that a data protection lawyer said would put some of the companies exploiting such tools to target advertising out of business.

Under the CNIL guideline, which the watchdog said must be adopted by March, internet users have the right to withdraw their consent on cookies – small pieces of data stored while navigating on the Web – at any time and they can refuse trackers when they go on a website.

“The internet user’s silence actually implies a refusal (to accept cookies),” said Etienne Drouard of American-British law firm Hogan Lovells.

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NIST is crowdsourcing differential privacy techniques for public safety datasets

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is launching the Differential Privacy Temporal Map Challenge. It’s a set of contests, with cash prizes attached, that’s intended to crowdsource new ways of handling personally identifiable information (PII) in public safety datasets.

The problem is that although rich, detailed data is valuable for researchers and for building AI models — in this case, in the areas of emergency planning and epidemiology — it raises serious and potentially dangerous data privacy and rights issues. Even if datasets are kept under proverbial lock and key, malicious actors can, based on just a few data points, re-infer sensitive information about people.

The solution is to de-identify the data such that it remains useful without compromising individuals’ privacy. NIST already has a clear standard for what that means. In part, and simply put, it says that “De-identification removes identifying information from a dataset so that

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