An international team of researchers developed a novel technique to produce precise, high-performing biometric sensors — ScienceDaily

Wearable sensors are evolving from watches and electrodes to bendable devices that provide far more precise biometric measurements and comfort for users. Now, an international team of researchers has taken the evolution one step further by printing sensors directly on human skin without the use of heat.

Led by Huanyu “Larry” Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Career Development Professor in the Penn State Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, the team published their results in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

“In this article, we report a simple yet universally applicable fabrication technique with the use of a novel sintering aid layer to enable direct printing for on-body sensors,” said first author Ling Zhang, a researcher in the Harbin Institute of Technology in China and in Cheng’s laboratory.

Cheng and his colleagues previously developed flexible printed circuit boards for use in wearable sensors, but printing directly on skin has been hindered by

Read More
Read More

Samsung To Produce The Latest 8nm Snapdragon 750 SoC

Samsung’s foundry business is on the rise over the last few quarters. The previous reports suggested that Qualcomm has chosen to use Samsung’s foundries for Snapdragon 875 production instead of TSMC. According to the latest report from South Korea, Samsung will manufacture the newly announced 8nm Snapdragon 750 5G mobile platform.

This new 5G chipset in the Snapdragon 7-series will use Samsung’s 8nm FinFET process. The Samsung Exynos 9820 is the first chip to come out of the company’s 8nm process node. Even the new-gen RTX 3000 Ampere GPUs are manufactured using Samsung’s 8nm process.

Qualcomm turns to Samsung for producing the 8nm Snapdragon 750 SoC

Xiaomi has already confirmed to launch the world’s first smartphone powered by the new Qualcomm Snapdragon 750 mobile platform. As per the source, the Mi 10 Lite 5G will debut later this year with this new chipset. Even Samsung will also use the Snapdragon

Read More
Read More

Inducing plasma in biomass could make biogas easier to produce

Inducing plasma in biomass could make biogas easier to produce
The plasma chamber in the experimental reactor setup, where 2-kilowatt microwave pulses are applied to a model stand-in for biomass, a recirculating carboxymethyl cellulose solution. Plasma induction in the material resulted in reduced viscosity, and the authors suspect it may break the polymer chain in lignocellulose. Credit: B. Honnorat, V. Brüser, and J.F. Kolb

Producing biogas from the bacterial breakdown of biomass presents options for a greener energy future, but the complex composition of biomass comes with a long list of challenges.


Cellulose and woody lignocellulose in biomass are especially hard for bacteria to digest, making the process inefficient. Chemical, physical, or mechanical processes, or several of them combined, can be used for pretreatment to make biomass easier to digest, but many of the current solutions are expensive or inefficient or rely on corrosive chemicals.

In research supported by the European Regional Development Fund, published in AIP Advances, researchers

Read More
Read More