Adorable moment Stanford professor was woken up by Nobel Prize win captured on camera

Photo of Katie Dowd

In this Monday, Oct. 12, 2020 photo provided by Stanford University, Robert Wilson, left, and Paul Milgrom wear masks as they stand for a photo in Stanford, Calif. The two American economists, both professors at Stanford, won the Nobel Prize in Economics for improving how auctions work. That research that underlies much of today's economy - from the way Google sells advertising to the way telecoms companies acquire airwaves from the government.

In this Monday, Oct. 12, 2020 photo provided by Stanford University, Robert Wilson, left, and Paul Milgrom wear masks as they stand for a photo in Stanford, Calif. The two American economists, both professors at Stanford, won the Nobel Prize in Economics for improving how auctions work. That research that underlies much of today’s economy — from the way Google sells advertising to the way telecoms companies acquire airwaves from the government.

Andrew Brodhead/Associated Press

When people are urgently calling and knocking on your door at 2 a.m., that’s rarely good news. But luckily for Stanford professor Paul Milgrom, Monday was the happiest early-morning disturbance of his life.

The Nobel Prize committee informs winners during work-day hours in Sweden, which means American recipients get calls in the wee small hours. So when the 2020 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences went to

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Alexander Lecture 2020: The future of dispute resolution delivered by Professor Richard Susskind OBE

LONDON, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb), the world’s leading professional body for the promotion of alternative dispute resolution, is delivering its annual flagship event Alexander Lecture, now in its 46th year, for the first time fully digital, as an online and complimentary event for members and non-members, on 12 November 2020, 6.00pm – 7:30pm GMT.

About the 46th Alexander Lecture

Our public and private systems for dispute resolution are under unprecedented strain. In overcoming the challenges arising from COVID-19 and in seeking to make dispute resolution more accessible, a new mindset is needed. In a digital age, it is time now to look at ways not simply of automating our current practices but of using the power of emerging technologies to transform our systems for resolving disputes. During the COVID-19 crisis, many hearings have been conducted remotely. Although many

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David Robertson, oft-quoted UMSL political science professor, dies at 69 | Obituaries

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David Robertson had planned to retire next year after spending nearly 40 years as a political science professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, but chose to retire in September so the university could honor the job offers it had made to two younger professors.

Even during pandemic budget squeezes, Dr. Robertson wanted to help.

“It spoke to Dave’s dedication to others,” said his longtime colleague Terry Jones, who said Dr. Robertson was always willing to guide co-workers and students. “He had

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The Science Femme Was Allegedly a White Male Professor Who Posed as Woman of Color and Bullied Women

“The Science Femme” claimed to be a female academic. She claimed to have upended efforts by her social justice-obsessed department to draft a statement condemning racism.

And when Twitter users accused her of racism, she claimed to be a woman of color herself—and an immigrant to boot.

But The Science Femme, who tweeted from the handle @piney_the, wasn’t any of those things, digital sleuths began alleging late last month. Instead, they claimed, “she” was Craig Chapman, a white male assistant professor of chemistry at the University of New Hampshire. The allegations, bolstered by an internal chemistry department email, would make Chapman at least the fourth white academic revealed to have posed as a person of color in recent weeks.

In three of those cases, academics are accused of shamelessly trying to further their own careers. But in Chapman’s case, Twitter users who came into contact with @piney_the say the account

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Professor uses 21st century technology to teach the classics amid pandemic

For more than five decades, Professor Emeritus Charles Krohn has nourished the soul of his students, teaching the classics at the University of St. Thomas in Houston — and he wasn’t about to let the coronavirus get in the way.

“They couldn’t run me off, so I just stayed around when the pandemic hit,” said Krohn.

But that’s meant embracing technology and a whole new way of teaching — at the age of 91.

When asked if his students are helping him, Krohn responded, “Oh, yes, definitely. Yeah, especially if something technical as well. ‘Well, Professor Krohn, why don’t you try doing this?'”

He currently teaches five days a week and often relies on his theater background to engage his students. 

“It makes for more communication because you’re aware of the audience, as I’ve now made, and in a way more aware of the students in this online contact,” said

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How do Americans view the virus? Anthropology professor examines attitudes, perceptions of COVID-19 — ScienceDaily

In her ongoing research about Americans’ responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, Northern Arizona University anthropology professor Lisa Hardy and her collaborators have talked to dozens of people. A couple of them stand out to the researchers.

Hardy spoke to a man who had polio as a child and had to live in a home with an iron lung away from his family. He said he was not in good health but he was not afraid of COVID-19 because he has seen all of this. A woman told anthropology lecturer Leah Mundell that she was the only Spanish-speaking contact tracer in her county, and she took on the responsibility of helping clients with much more than their physical health, connecting them with services and translating for them as they struggled to access resources.

Hardy’s research, to which Mundell contributed, was published this week in Medical Anthropology. “Connection, Contagion, and COVID-19”

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