How To Protect Your Privacy Online In 8 Tips : Life Kit : NPR

Your tech is watching you.

Jackie Ferrentino for NPR

Your tech is watching you.

Jackie Ferrentino for NPR

Before I became a reporter at NPR, I worked for a few years at tech companies.

One of the companies was in the marketing technology business — the industry that’s devoted in part to tracking people and merging their information, so they can be advertised to more effectively.

That tracking happens in multiple senses: Physical tracking, because we carry our phones everywhere we go. And virtual tracking, of all the places we go online.

The more I understood how my information was being collected, shared and sold, the more I wanted to protect my privacy. But it’s still hard to know which of my efforts are actually effective and which are a waste of time.

So I reached out to experts in digital security and privacy to find out what they do to protect their stuff – and what they recommend most

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To protect nature’s benefits, focus on people — ScienceDaily

To calculate the true value of a forest, we need to know how people benefit from it, according to new research published in Nature Sustainability. A healthy forest holds a treasure trove of benefits for people — it can filter water for downstream communities, supply timber for building, and provide a place for people to connect with nature. But a forest — or any other ecosystem — won’t necessarily provide the same things to everyone.

“Context matters,” says Lisa Mandle, lead scientist at the Stanford Natural Capital Project and lead author on the paper. “If we want to protect the critical natural assets we all depend on, we need actionable policies that incorporate people’s diverse needs. It shouldn’t be a one-size-fits-all approach when we’re talking about people and nature.”

There’s a growing global movement to invest in nature in order to protect vital resources and improve climate resilience. But

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Data tool helps users manage water resources, protect infrastructure — ScienceDaily

River systems are essential resources for everything from drinking water supply to power generation — but these systems are also hydrologically complex, and it is not always clear how water flow data from various monitoring points relates to any specific piece of infrastructure. Researchers from Cornell University and North Carolina State University have now developed a tool that draws from multiple databases to give water resource managers and infrastructure users the information they need to make informed decisions about water use on river networks.

“A streamgage tells you what the water level is at a specific point in the river — but that’s not really enough information,” says Sankar Arumugam, co-author of a paper on the work and a professor of civil engineering at NC State. “If you are an infrastructure operator, what you really need to know is how long it will take for that water-level information to be

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Most nations failing to protect nature in COVID-19 pandemic recovery plans

Most nations failing to protect nature in COVID-19 pandemic recovery plans
The financial district of New York City as seen from Liberty State Park in New Jersey during the COVID-19 pandemic. Credit: Pamela McElwee

The COVID-19 pandemic provides an opportunity to reset the global economy and reverse decades of ecosystem and species losses, but most countries are failing to invest in nature-related economic reforms or investments, according to a Rutgers-led paper.


Indeed, some countries, including the United States, Brazil and Australia, are back-tracking on existing laws and relaxing regulations and enforcement actions aimed at protecting nature, according to lead author Pamela McElwee, an associate professor in the Department of Human Ecology in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences at Rutgers University-New Brunswick.

“Just last week at the United Nations, more than 60 heads of state spoke at a virtual summit and pledged their support to tackle the biodiversity crisis. But when we look at what countries are doing, either in

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Optiv Security’s See Jane Secure Goes Behind the Scenes on How Organizations Must Protect Against Their Own

Optiv Security, a security solutions integrator delivering end-to-end cybersecurity solutions, today released See Jane Secure. The e-book takes readers through a day in the life of a cyber-unaware employee and how an organization and its security professionals can defend against the employee’s actions proactively and reactively with security awareness training and services and solutions tailored to fit business needs. The e-book is one part of Optiv’s efforts to engage organizations and individuals on the need for cybersecurity training throughout Cybersecurity Awareness Month (October), an initiative led by the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) and the National Cyber Security Alliance.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201007005088/en/

(Photo: Business Wire)

The book presents Optiv’s combination of people, process, and technology as a way to combat internal and external cyberthreats, and also illustrates its own solutions and services that can play a major role in alleviating

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Donald Trump administration imposes new curbs on H-1B visas to protect US workers, narrows ‘specialty occupation’ definition



a man wearing a suit and tie: Donald Trump administration imposes new curbs on H-1B visas to protect US workers, narrows ‘specialty occupation’ definition


© Provided by Firstpost
Donald Trump administration imposes new curbs on H-1B visas to protect US workers, narrows ‘specialty occupation’ definition

Washington: The Trump administration has announced new restrictions on H-1B nonimmigrant visa programme which it said is aimed at protecting American workers, restoring integrity and to better guarantee that H-1B petitions are approved only for qualified beneficiaries and petitioners, a move which is likely to affect thousands of Indian IT professionals.

The interim final rule announced by the Department of Homeland Security on Tuesday, less than four weeks ahead of the US presidential election, will narrow the definition of “specialty occupation” as Congress intended by closing the overbroad definition that allowed companies to game the system.

It will also require companies to make “real” offers to “real employees,” by closing loopholes and preventing the displacement of the American workers. And finally, the new rules would enhance the department’s

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Trump admin imposes new curbs on H-1B visas to protect US workers ahead of presidential election

Washington, Oct 7 (PTI) The Trump administration has announced new restrictions on H-1B nonimmigrant visa programme which it said is aimed at protecting American workers, restoring integrity and to better guarantee that H-1B petitions are approved only for qualified beneficiaries and petitioners, a move which is likely to affect thousands of Indian IT professionals.

The interim final rule announced by the Department of Homeland Security on Tuesday, less than four weeks ahead of the US presidential election, will narrow the definition of “specialty occupation” as Congress intended by closing the overbroad definition that allowed companies to game the system.

It will also require companies to make “real” offers to “real employees,” by closing loopholes and preventing the displacement of the American workers. And finally, the new rules would enhance the department’s ability to enforce compliance through worksite inspections and monitor compliance before, during and after an H1-B petition is approved.

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Militia groups like Oath Keepers pledge to protect property amid charges of racism

More than 100 protesters — some wearing all black and carrying pistols — marched up to the approximately 20 people who had gathered Thursday evening awaiting instructions from the Oath Keepers, a heavily armed civilian group that has guarded private businesses during racial justice demonstrations this year.

The man leading the protesters, Chris Will, 34, criticized the people in fatigues for showing up to defend property but not the life of the 26-year-old Black woman who was killed by Louisville police in her apartment in March.

“Why didn’t every single one of you motherf—ers put this s— on to come help Breonna Taylor when they killed her?” Will asked the armed men, pointing at their body armor.

Oath Keepers leaders urged members not to respond; escalating tensions with demonstrators would only feed public perception that they were the problem, not the solution.

Oath Keepers is one of numerous vigilante groups

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Gamer-Centric Uninterruptible Power Supply Set To Protect Xbox Series X, PS5 And PC

PS5’s Demon’s Soul’s remake won’t be easy, and experiencing a power outage right before the next checkpoint could be downright catastrophic. Isn’t that game already hard enough as it is?

This past week, power protection leader Schneider Electric announced the imminent release of its new gamer-focused interruptible power supply, the APC Back-UPS Pro Gaming UPS. The upcoming gadget seeks “to protect gaming gear and maintain [players’] connection through power irregularities”, this according to the official press release.

In typical gamer aesthetic fashion, the device will feature 12 customizable RGB LED lights. Sinewave battery backup power, coupled with AVR (Automatic Voltage Regulator), promises to supply a silky smooth electrical current to your Xbox Series X, PS5 or PC gaming rig during dangerous power irregularities and outages.

Even routers and modems will be protected. For those unfamiliar with this sort of technology, after the

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To Protect Good Jobs, End Tax Breaks for Job-Killing Technology

Ever wonder why companies spend so much money on machinery and software that kills jobs? One reason is that the U.S. tax code practically forces their hands. The tax on capital has fallen to around 5% in recent years while the tax on labor has remained around 25%, according to a new white paper (PDF) for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Task Force on the Work of the Future.

“Favorable taxation of capital leads to excessive automation,” MIT economist Daron Acemoglu, the lead author of the paper, said in an Oct. 1 interview. Acemoglu testified about excessive automation before the House Budget Committee on Sept. 10 (PDF) and expanded on the tax aspects in the new paper.

The standard economic argument in favor of lightly taxing capital (equipment, software, buildings) is that the supply of capital is highly sensitive to tax rates. High taxes will discourage investment in

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