90% of consumers ages 18-24 are willing to share smartphone data if privacy protections are offered

Market Snapshot analyzes consumer research on attitudes on data sharing and personal experiences with COVID-19

DALLAS, Oct. 13, 2020reports among heads of US broadband households ages 18-24, 90% are willing to share smartphone data if privacy protections are offered. In contrast, just over 63% of those age 65+ are willing to share data.

Higher income households and those with higher levels of education are also more likely than lower income households and those with lower educational attainment to share their data.

“As COVID-19 continues to spread, more people will know someone who has contracted COVID-19, which will likely increase their willingness to share smartphone data,” said Jennifer Kent, Senior Director, Parks Associates. “Already 93% of US broadband households report lifestyle changes to limit the spread of the disease, so smartphone data in aid of contact tracing gives consumers an opportunity to take an active role in combating the virus.”

Consumers’

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In unusual move, Justice Department asks Congress to limit Section 230 protections for tech firms

The U.S. Justice Department today sent Congress draft legislation intended to limit the scope of Section 230, a legal shield that gives online platforms immunity against certain types of lawsuits. 

Section 230 is a statute in the Communications Decency Act that protects companies such as Facebook Inc. from being held legally liable for user content. It allows tech firms to remove a post without the risk of being sued if they deem it to be “obscene, lewd, lascivious, filthy, excessively violent, harassing or otherwise objectionable.” Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have called for Section 230 to be revised amid a broader debate in Washington about social media.

The change proposed by the Justice Department today consists of several points. First, the draft legislation seeks to narrow the criteria that tech companies must meet to qualify for the Section 230 legal shield. Under the proposal, an online platform could

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The DOJ asked Congress to erode big tech’s legal protections as Trump accused firms of anti-conservative bias and ‘cancel culture’



a man looking at the camera: Attorney General William Barr (center) listens during a discussion with state attorneys general on social media abuses hosted by President Donald Trump in the Cabinet Room at the White House in Washington, September 23, 2020. REUTERS/Tom Brenner


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Attorney General William Barr (center) listens during a discussion with state attorneys general on social media abuses hosted by President Donald Trump in the Cabinet Room at the White House in Washington, September 23, 2020. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

  • Attorney General William Barr announced Wednesday the Department of Justice has submitted legislation to Congress to reform the part of the US law that gives tech companies broad powers to moderate their platforms.
  • Barr said the proposed legislation is aimed at “requiring greater transparency and accountability when platforms remove lawful speech.”
  • The legislation follows on from an executive order issued by President Trump in May targeting social media for alleged anti-conservative bias.
  • Trump often claims online platforms are biased against conservatives, but has provided minimal evidence backing this up. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Trump is ramping up the pressure on social media companies.

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