‘Two Screens for Teachers’ to supply extra monitors in Seattle and puts out call for help in other cities

The two-screen setup of an elementary school teacher in Seattle. (Photo courtesy of Two Screens for Teachers)

Remote teaching is about to get a little bit easier for thousands of teachers in Seattle Public Schools. The nonprofit organization “Two Screens for Teachers” announced Tuesday that it’s purchasing a second computer monitor for every teacher who needs one, and plans to deliver about 3,000 monitors at a value of around $430,000.

Started by a small group of Seattle startup veterans, Two Screens for Teachers aims to boost teacher productivity through added technology, helping to make remote instruction less stressful during the ongoing pandemic.

Matt Lerner and Mike Mathieu are behind the idea. They previously co-founded Walk Score, a Seattle startup that sold to Redfin in 2014. Their hope is that their latest cause will spread beyond Seattle and they can inspire techies in other cities to purchase monitors for the thousands

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Georgia Tech puts on flashy show vs. Louisville

Enough of the turnovers, the Jackets decided. Using a bye week to concentrate on ball security, they seemed to flush from their system the 10 turnovers from their previous two games. It was a most effective purge, as they gave Louisville exactly no help this night.

ExploreWhat Geoff Collins said after the game

No wet ball eluded their grasp, while the Cardinals committed three fumbles that were all costly. Credit Tech’s comfort with the elements, players and head coach agreed, to the waste of a perfectly good, expansive and expensive indoor practice facility. On rainy practice days, the Jackets are known to step outside and slop around just to get comfortable with the elements.

The best that can be said of a Tech defense that gave up 471 yards to Louisville and allowed the Cardinals a 13-minute advantage in time of possession was that it was anxious to pick

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Who Puts the Right into “The Right Stuff”?

I’m not generally a fan of reboots. I had no need for an updated version of Total Recall, and I’ll be just fine if I never again have to watch Bruce Wayne’s parents die so that he can grow up to become Batman. My feeling is: If you’re going to return to familiar material, at least come at it in a fresh way—like the second Battlestar Galactica, or like each new rover that NASA sends to Mars.

Fortunately, the TV adaptation of The Right Stuff (whose first two episodes were just released on Disney+) is more Curiosity rover than Total Recall 2012. As the title tells you, the new series draws on Tom Wolfe’s 1979 beloved book of the same name, which is still one of the best accounts of the dawn of the space age. The book, in turn, begat a 1983 film adaptation, which has its

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Crypto For Congress Puts “American-Made” Bitcoin Into The Hands Of Policymakers

This week, the Chamber of Digital Commerce PAC sent all 535 members of the United States Congress about 0.0047 BTC ($50 worth at the time), in an effort to educate the country’s legislators around cryptocurrency and blockchain technology that it calls Crypto For Congress.

Leveraging Federal Election Commission rules that allow for cryptocurrency-based campaign contributions and its own Political Action Committee to make the BTC donations, the Chamber of Digital Commerce ultimately hopes to motivate these lawmakers to embrace the advantages presented by blockchain technology.

“Our industry faces a number of regulatory challenges and it’s important for our government officials to have a working knowledge of how this technology works,” Perianne Boring, founder and president of the Chamber of Digital Commerce, told Bitcoin Magazine. “If you look at tax laws, securities laws, if you look at compliance obligations, there are a lot of examples of regulators and policymakers who

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Trump’s stimulus bill bombshell puts new pressure on an ailing economy. Here’s the latest

President Donald Trump’s call for an end to stimulus negotiations on a new stimulus bill presented a new wrinkle in the story of the country’s economic recovery from the deep financial fissures of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. His tweet a few hours later urged Congress to pass several of the stimulus measures that had been part of those very discussions. Neither political analysts nor many of the millions who’ve suffered financial calamity on account of the pandemic seem to know what to make of the president’s messaging.



a pair of scissors: Americans are cutting back on spending as they plan for a recession that might not end until the coronavirus pandemic is over. Angela Lang/CNET


© Provided by CNET
Americans are cutting back on spending as they plan for a recession that might not end until the coronavirus pandemic is over. Angela Lang/CNET



a pair of scissors


© Angela Lang/CNET


The stimulus package that had been under negotiation was expected to include a second stimulus check and renewed enhanced unemployment benefits. Without it, many of those hit hardest by the

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Pizza-making robot startup Picnic raises $3M as pandemic puts spotlight on food automation

Picnic’s pizza-making robot at CES earlier this year. (GeekWire Photo / Taylor Soper)

Seattle startup Picnic raised an additional $3 million from existing investors as it gears up for a commercial rollout of its pizza-making robot.

Vulcan Capital, Flying Fish Partners, Creative Ventures, Arnold Venture Group, and others put more money behind Picnic, known for its automated food preparation device that can churn out up to 300 12-inch customized pizzas per hour. It follows a $5 million seed round in November.

The fresh cash will be used for product development, response to customer interest, new hires, and marketing. The company has seen increased demand for its machine during the pandemic from customers looking for ways to prepare food with less contact.

“This work is important because we’re supporting struggling restaurants who are looking for any advantage that will help them weather the storm of losing 60% of their sales,” CEO

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Larry Ellison’s TikTok bid puts Oracle chairman back in the spotlight

Oracle Corp. co-founder Larry Ellison’s pursuit of a deal with TikTok could win him two prizes at once: a flashy new customer for his company’s lagging cloud-computing business and a victory over a fierce rival.

Mr. Ellison, 76 years old and chairman of the company, has reason to be a big fan of Chinese-owned TikTok, a video-sharing app famously beloved by young people. But first Oracle, TikTok and their partners have to get a deal done that could return the business-software company to the center of the tech world.

Mr. Ellison maneuvered Oracle ahead of Microsoft Corp. in the race to become TikTok’s U.S. tech partner, and personally lobbied President Trump to sign off on a preliminary agreement, people familiar with the talks said.

VIRAL TIKTOK VIDEO

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Commerce Puts Tighter Export Controls On New Technologies

Law360 (October 2, 2020, 6:01 PM EDT) — The U.S. Department of Commerce tightened export controls on six developing technologies in a rule issued Friday, targeting tools used to make integrated circuits and microprocessors, and certain hacking tools and surveillance software.

The final rule implements multilateral controls on recently developed, or developing, technologies that were agreed to at a December 2019 meeting of signatories to the Wassenaar Arrangement, an international agreement covering export controls for certain weapons and dual-use technologies that have both military and civilian uses.

“The United States’ implementation of WA list changes ensures that U.S. companies have a level playing field with their competitors in other…

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Quibi’s Slow Start Puts Pressure on Katzenberg to Boost Cash

(Bloomberg) — Quibi, one of Hollywood’s most ballyhooed startups, is having a rocky first year.

Founder Jeffrey Katzenberg  envisioned an app that would entertain people during the odd, in-between times in their lives — while commuting, say, or waiting in line at the bank. But when the April launch date arrived, Americans were in lockdown due to the coronavirus, meaning such moments had all but disappeared.

On Sept. 21, the Wall Street Journal reported that Quibi has so far failed to reach its subscriber targets and is working with advisers to assess its options, including a possible sale or a capital raise.  



Jeffrey Katzenberg sitting on a bench: Quibi Founder Jeffrey Katzenberg And CEO Meg Whitman Interview


© Bloomberg
Quibi Founder Jeffrey Katzenberg And CEO Meg Whitman Interview

A lot can change in the future. Quibi could have a wildly popular hit show that lures in millions of new subscribers. A nation of smartphone consumers venturing back into the world could embrace the service as 

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During pandemic, racism puts additional stress on Asian Americans — ScienceDaily

Many people are feeling anxious during these uncertain times as they navigate the risks associated with COVID-19 and experience the tension from physical distancing or isolation for what can seem like an eternity. But people of Asian ancestry face yet another set of challenges posed by racism and xenophobia which has soared during the COVID-19 pandemic amidst rumors and blame placed on China.

This pandemic-driven rise in anti-Asian racism is so pronounced, that in a commentary recently published in the American Journal of Public Health, psychiatrist Justin A. Chen, MD, MPH, and his coauthors have described it as a “secondary contagion” threatening this population.

Chen is an investigator in the Department of Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. In addition, he serves as executive director and co-founder of the MGH Center for Cross Cultural Student Emotional Wellness. He is lead author

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