AMD Project Quantum Possibly Revived: Potential Zen 3 And RDNA 2 Mini Gaming PC Incoming?

project quantum lift hero
Over five years ago, AMD launched the R9 Fury, R9 Nano, and showed off something called Project Quantum. Project Quantum would have been a wholly redesigned PC from AMD with its own hardware inside. As the GPUs came and went, Project Quantum went dark… until today. A Twitter user by the name @Pete_2097 discovered a patent from AMD, which was filed in February and granted last month, for the design of Project Quantum.

2015 was undoubtedly an intriguing year for computer cases. That was the year HotHardware gave away a CyberPower Trinity Xtreme PC, which had three separate chambers. AMD also had their interesting design with the Project Quantum PC. The PC was designed to be “the VR PC of the future” with a complete redesign from the ground up. It was a small form-factor device with a split chamber setup. The bottom chamber would house water-cooled components, and the

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Commercially Available Silicon Quantum Computer Moves Forward With Quietest Bits On Record

KEY POINTS

  • Physicists achieve a noise level 10 times lower than the previous record
  • Demonstration proves to take a major step closer to a full-scale silicon quantum processor 
  • Next step could be a 10-qubit prototype quantum integrated processor by 2023

The lowest noise level on record for a semiconductor quantum bit has been demonstrated by a team of quantum physicists, bringing the development of a commercially available silicon quantum computer one step forward to possibility. 

In a study published in Advanced Materials, the physicists said they were able to achieve a noise level 10 times lower than previously recorded for any semiconductor qubit. Specifically, they demonstrated a low-level charge noise of  S0 = 0.0088 ± 0.0004 μeV2 Hz−1. 

As a next step, the team is now looking forward to demonstrating the capability required to produce a reliable 10-qubit prototype quantum integrated processor by 2023. 

“Our team is now working towards

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A new interpretation of quantum mechanics suggests reality does not depend on the measurer — ScienceDaily

Quantum mechanics arose in the 1920s — and since then scientists have disagreed on how best to interpret it. Many interpretations, including the Copenhagen interpretation presented by Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg and in particular von Neumann-Wigner interpretation, state that the consciousness of the person conducting the test affects its result. On the other hand, Karl Popper and Albert Einstein thought that an objective reality exists. Erwin Schrödinger put forward the famous thought experiment involving the fate of an unfortunate cat that aimed to describe the imperfections of quantum mechanics.

In their most recent article, Finnish civil servants Jussi Lindgren and Jukka Liukkonen, who study quantum mechanics in their free time, take a look at the uncertainty principle that was developed by Heisenberg in 1927. According to the traditional interpretation of the principle, location and momentum cannot be determined simultaneously to an arbitrary degree of precision ,as the person conducting

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The White House Announces Quantum.Gov and Quantum Frontiers Report

Oct. 7, 2020 — The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) has announced the launch of Quantum.gov, the official website of the National Quantum Coordination Office, and the release of the Quantum Frontiers Report identifying key areas for continued quantum information science (QIS) research.

“With the launch of Quantum.gov, the White House has created an online home for the National Quantum Coordination Office and a new digital hub for the growing quantum community to connect with wide-ranging activities underway across the Federal Government. The newly published Quantum Frontiers Report lays out critical research questions for the entire U.S. innovation ecosystem to tackle in the years ahead, and will serve as an important roadmap for researchers around the country,” said Michael Kratsios, U.S. Chief Technology Officer.

Quantum.gov will feature resources and news on QIS activities from across the Federal government, geared towards both the research community and the

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IonQ Releases A New 32-Qubit Trapped-Ion Quantum Computer With Massive Quantum Volume Claims

Last May, I had a discussion with Peter Chapman, CEO of IonQ, a start-up quantum computing company.  Before coming to IonQ, Chapman worked for Amazon, where he was responsible for all the technical complexities of Amazon Prime.  IonQ had accomplished a lot in the twelve months that Chapman had been at the helm, so I was looking forward to talking to him. 

My biggest surprise during that discussion was that IonQ was simultaneously working on its next three generations of its trapped-ion quantum computers – 5th, 6th, and 7th generations. 

In a recent follow-up with Chapman, including Chris Monroe, IonQ’s Co-founder and Chief Scientist, we discussed IonQ’s release of its 5th generation quantum hardware.  Keep in mind that the 6th and 7th generations are still in development. Chapman said that each generation would be smaller and more powerful than its predecessor when released.  Although he

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Aliro Surges Ahead As The Leader In Quantum Network Technologies With New Products, Research, and Funding

“The quantum internet will enable transformative applications with wide-ranging societal impacts, including physics-based secure communications, ultra-precise long-baseline astronomy, and advances in medical imaging,” said Aliro Quantum CTO Prineha Narang, PhD. “But to build these networks, telecom and government organizations have an immediate need for accurate simulation and emulation tools. Aliro is proud to unveil pioneering research and simulation products, significant milestones on our mission to make quantum technologies accessible with a write-once-run-anywhere cloud platform.”

Aliro will introduce two new quantum simulation products with superior usability and accuracy to help quantum R&D departments significantly reduce the time and budget associated with distributed quantum computing development:

  • Aliro™ Q.Compute (AQC) is a hardware-independent quantum computing development environment with an intuitive UX, access to a variety of quantum computing backends, and a robust set of optimization schemes. AQC’s noise-expert compiler makes the necessary transformations to quantum circuits, freeing quantum R&D teams of constraint considerations
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Light Rider Unveils Quantum LiFi Technology to Create Next-Generation Network Security

Powered by quantum technologies, Light Rider launches first two products to put quantum grade encryption into anyone’s hands

Light Rider Inc., a quantum LiFi company, today debuted its first two quantum encryption products poised to revolutionize network security for businesses and individuals. The company is the first to combine LiFi, a wireless communication technology that utilizes light to transmit data between devices, and quantum encryption technology for individual users. By marrying the two groundbreaking technologies, Light Rider is setting the stage for a new type of wireless networking with unparalleled security, improved speed and reduced latency. The release of Light Rider’s first two products gives users instant quantum encryption right out of the box with LiFi infrastructure coming in the future.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201006005277/en/

Powered by quantum technologies, Light Rider launches first two products to put quantum grade encryption into anyone’s hands

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The Quantum Prisoner, a free scientific and technological video game is now available online

The Quantum Prisoner, a free scientific and technological video game is now available online
Credit: CEA

Science, logic, and technology are your best allies in The Quantum Prisoner, a completely free browser-based point-and-click adventure that is today playable in English on PC, Mac and mobile devices and tablets. Featuring 10-12 hours of gameplay, The Quantum Prisoner takes you on a journey around the globe to find out what happened to the physician Artus Cropp, who mysteriously disappeared back in the 1960s. Playing as Zoe, curious and resourceful young woman, you must solve more than 30 technology, science and engineering-based puzzles from operating particle accelerators and fuel cells to robots and more. You will escape perilous situations, progress through your investigation and make a discovery that will change the world!


“As a public science research organization, the CEA aims to open up the exciting world of science to the next generation of budding young brilliant minds and so made The Quantum Prisoner into a completely

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Scientists find evidence of exotic state of matter in candidate material for quantum computers

Scientists find evidence of exotic state of matter in candidate material for quantum computers
An illustration of the crystal structure of ruthenium trichloride showing the simple honeycomb lattice of ruthenium ions and chlorine ions. The twisted octahedra formed by chlorine around the electron spin of each ruthenium atom are mirror images of each other. This twist is key to the compound’s unusual behavior, which is evidence that it may contain an example of a quantum spin liquid. Credit: Courtesy of Arkady Shekhter/ National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

Using a novel technique, scientists working at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory have found evidence for a quantum spin liquid, a state of matter that is promising as a building block for the quantum computers of tomorrow.


Researchers discovered the exciting behavior while studying the so-called electron spins in the compound ruthenium trichloride. Their findings, published today in the journal Nature Physics , show that electron spins interact across the material, effectively lowering

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Fast-forwarding quantum calculations skips past the time limits imposed by decoherence, which plagues today’s machines — ScienceDaily

A new algorithm that fast forwards simulations could bring greater use ability to current and near-term quantum computers, opening the way for applications to run past strict time limits that hamper many quantum calculations.

“Quantum computers have a limited time to perform calculations before their useful quantum nature, which we call coherence, breaks down,” said Andrew Sornborger of the Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences division at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and senior author on a paper announcing the research. “With a new algorithm we have developed and tested, we will be able to fast forward quantum simulations to solve problems that were previously out of reach.”

Computers built of quantum components, known as qubits, can potentially solve extremely difficult problems that exceed the capabilities of even the most powerful modern supercomputers. Applications include faster analysis of large data sets, drug development, and unraveling the mysteries of superconductivity, to name a

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