What The U.S. Investment In Quantum Computing Means For Security

President and CEO of Quantum Xchange. Delivering quantum safety with Post Quantum Cryptographic algorithms and Quantum Key Distribution.

The internet as we know it is no longer safe. Being able to secure it — one way or another — is going to be paramount to business and national interests.

Over the past few months, there has been an uptick in activity on the quantum cryptography front. The good news? The U.S. is finally moving forward with serious government, academic and business backing. The bad news? We may already be too far behind.

In August, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Department of Energy (DOE) announced the investment of more than $1 billion over the next five years to five quantum information science (QIS) centers. It’s a joint initiative, with $625 million of the funding coming from the government and $340 million from the private sector and academia.

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Quantum computing: Photon startup lights up the future of computers and cryptography

A fast-growing UK startup is quietly making strides in the promising field of quantum photonics. Cambridge-based company Nu Quantum is building devices that can emit and detect quantum particles of light, called single photons. With a freshly secured £2.1 million ($2.71 million) seed investment, these devices could one day underpin sophisticated quantum photonic systems, for applications ranging from quantum communications to quantum computing.

The company is developing high-performance light-emitting and light-detecting components, which operate at the single-photon level and at ambient temperature, and is building a business based on the combination of quantum optics, semiconductor photonics, and information theory, spun out of the University of Cambridge after eight years of research at the Cavendish Laboratory.

“Any quantum photonic system will start with a source of single photons, and end with a detector of single photons,” Carmen Palacios-Berraquero, the CEO of Nu Quantum, tells ZDNet. “These technologies are different things, but

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The Quantum Internet Will Blow Your Mind. Here’s What It Will Look Like

This article appeared in the November 2020 issue of Discover magazine as “The Quest for a Quantum Internet.” Subscribe for more stories like these.


Call it the quantum Garden of Eden. Fifty or so miles east of New York City, on the campus of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Eden Figueroa is one of the world’s pioneering gardeners planting the seeds of a quantum internet. Capable of sending enormous amounts of data over vast distances, it would work not just faster than the current internet but faster than the speed of light — instantaneously, in fact, like the teleportation of Mr. Spock and Captain Kirk in Star Trek.

Sitting in Brookhaven’s light-filled cafeteria, his shoulder-length black hair fighting to free itself from the clutches of a ponytail, Figueroa — a Mexico native who is an associate professor at Stony Brook University — tries to explain how it will work. He grabs

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Can Vizio’s P-Series Quantum X Make You Forget About LG and Samsung?

Whenever those heated discussions veer toward the best TV panels on the planet right now, they invariably land on LG’s OLED and Samsung’s QLED HDTVs.

Yes, there’s no doubting their ability to provide jaw-dropping picture quality—but at what price? During this ongoing coronavirus pandemic, many people, understandably, just aren’t in a financial situation where they can just throw around $2,000 or $3,000 on a top-of-the-line HDTV.

If you do share such sentiments, then make sure to take a long hard look at Vizio’s sixty-five-inch P-Series Quantum X. And right now, this highly regarded set is retailing for only $1,200. If you happen to desire an even bigger display, know that the seventy-five-inch monster is going for a reasonable $1,700. 

Be aware that Quantum X’s panel will probably never topple LG’s OLEDs from the best-picture summit, but it does emphatically meet the high standards of the best LCD-based, quantum dot-enhanced HDTVs

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Hiya Enables Quantum Assurance International, Inc. to Connect With Customers With a New Voice Performance Strategy

Hiya Connect drives higher answer and conversion rates while delivering industry-leading intelligence to the Quantum Assurance team

Hiya, the leading call performance management cloud, today announced a new partnership with Quantum Assurance International, Inc. to drive higher answer and conversion rates with the Branded Calls feature and proactive reputation management. With the new voice performance strategy, Quantum Assurance has significantly improved customer experience, increased workforce productivity, and boosted brand awareness.

As an independent insurance company that makes more than 500,000 calls per month, Quantum Assurance has seen an immediate business impact with Hiya Connect’s Branded Calls and reputation management services, including:

  • Answer rates have increased 17%, enabling agents to more efficiently reach customers who are actively shopping for insurance quotes;

  • Call durations have increased 19%, providing for more engaging conversations that lead to higher sales conversions;

  • Calls answered on the first attempt have increased 10%, optimizing the agents’ calling efforts

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BT Is Using Quantum Technology To Secure Gigabytes Of Sensitive Data Sent Between Two Industrial Sites In The UK

Did the promise of quantum-secure networking just take an important this is not hype leap?

Things are certainly looking promising with the news that telecom giant BT and Toshiba Labs have hooked up two research sites in the UK city of Bristol over a 6km link using Quantum Key Distribution (QKD).

The sites are National Composites Centre (NCC) at the University of Bristol, a development center researching the manufacture of composite materials, and the Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS), which carries out engineering testing.

This might like just another demo of the emerging use of quantum and QKD technology, but there’s an important twist – the link is used to transfer large amounts of data on an ongoing basis, making this one of the first mainstream uses of QKD for that purpose yet made public anywhere in the world.

The data

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D-Wave announces launch of new Advantage quantum computer for business use

D-Wave announces launch of new Advantage quantum computer for business use
Credit: D-Wave

Canadian based D-Wave has announced on its blog that it has developed a new quantum computer for use by businesses. Called Advantage, the new system has 5,000 qubits and 15-way qubit connectivity. The new machine will be made available to business customers over the Internet via the Leap quantum cloud service.


Over the past several years, several companies have dedicated resources to the development of a true quantum computer that can tackle problems conventional computers cannot handle. Progress on developing such computers has been slow, however, especially when compared with the early development of the conventional computer. As part of the research effort, companies have taken different approaches. Google and IBM, for example, are working on gate-model quantum computer technology, in which qubits are modified as an algorithm is executed. D-Wave, in sharp contrast, has been focused on developing so-called annealer technology, in which qubits are cooled during

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CERN meets quantum technology

CERN meets quantum technology
The AEgIS 1T antimatter trap stack. CERN’s AEgIS experiment is able to explore the multi-particle entangled nature of photons from positronium annihilation, and is one of several examples of existing CERN research with relevance to quantum technologies. Credit: CERN

Today’s information and communication technology grew out of the invention and development of quantum mechanics during the last century. But, nifty as it is that billions of transistors can be packed into your smartphone or that photons are routed around the internet with the help of lasers, the devices underpinning the “first quantum revolution” merely rely on the weird properties of quantum mechanics – they don’t put them to use directly.


The CERN Quantum Technology Initiative (QTI), which was announced by CERN Director-General Fabiola Gianotti in June, sees CERN join a rapidly-growing global effort to bring about a “second quantum revolution” – whereby phenomena such as superposition and entanglement, which enable

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Avoiding environmental losses in quantum information systems — ScienceDaily

New research published in EPJ D has revealed how robust initial states can be prepared in quantum information systems, minimising any unwanted transitions which lead to losses in quantum information.

Through new techniques for generating ‘exceptional points’ in quantum information systems, researchers have minimised the transitions through which they lose information to their surrounding environments.

Recently, researchers have begun to exploit the effects of quantum mechanics to process information in some fascinating new ways. One of the main challenges faced by these efforts is that systems can easily lose their quantum information as they interact with particles in their surrounding environments. To understand this behaviour, researchers in the past have used advanced models to observe how systems can spontaneously evolve into different states over time — losing their quantum information in the process. Through new research published in EPJ D, M. Reboiro and colleagues at the University of La Plata

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Watch live: Quantum computing, cryptography and healthcare headline Upgrade 2020 event

The technology world has a lengthy track record of game-changing innovations generated by research labs, ranging from transistors and hard drives to the graphical user interface, which made it possible for humans to interact with computers without having to write code.

The Japanese telecom company NTT Ltd. is now seeking to follow in those same footsteps with a research lab it opened in 2019 in Silicon Valley. The NTT Research lab aims to develop technologies for cryptographic and information security, quantum and neuro-science computing, and healthcare informatics. The company, which spends about $3.6 billion each year on R&D, is hosting its virtual Upgrade 2020 – The NTT Research Summit from September 28–October 1. In attendance will be prominent academics and scientists to see presentations on emerging new technologies.

“Emerging technologies have a way of looking futuristic, until they’re not,” said Kazuhiro Gomi, president and chief executive officer of

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