Apple enters 5G race with new iPhone 12 range

(Reuters) – Apple Inc on Tuesday launched its next-generation iPhone 12, with faster 5G connectivity that the California company hopes will spur consumers to trade in their old phones and keep its sales booming through the end of the year.

The core of the line-up, the iPhone 12 with a 6.1-inch display, will sell for $799, while a ‘Mini’ version with a 5.4-inch screen will be slightly cheaper at $699. A ‘Pro’ version with three cameras and a new 3-D ‘lidar’ sensor starts at $999, with the largest ‘Pro Max’ starting at $1,099 and going up to $1,399.

The new products will test whether Apple can ride a wave of consumer excitement around 5G wireless data networks, whose speediest variants outstrip their predecessors’ data rates multiple times over.

But whether iPhone buyers see a dramatic speed boost will depend heavily on where they are and which carrier they use –

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Europe Can Win Electric Car Sales Race If It Learns From China

(Bloomberg) — Sales of electric vehicles in Europe are growing at such a pace that the continent looks increasingly likely to outpace China in the near future.

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That’s one of the findings of a report released Tuesday by London-based automotive research firm Jato Dynamics. However, it found that Europe and the U.S. still have a few things to learn from China, the world’s biggest EV market, including prioritizing affordability, centralizing planning, and using data to better understand consumers.

Demand for cleaner and smarter cars is rising globally, particularly in Europe where the market has been bolstered by tighter emissions regulations along with an increasing awareness of climate change. EV sales in Europe in the first half exceeded China for the first time since 2015.

Although the coronavirus pandemic hurt all car sales, including EVs, which fell 15% globally in the second quarter, the market for electric vehicles is

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Silicon Valley is famously liberal. Then, investors and employees started clashing over race.

SAN FRANCISCO — The day after President Donald Trump told the Proud Boys, a far-right group with a history of inciting violence, to “stand back and stand by,” during the first presidential debate last month, tech investor Cyan Banister tweeted that the group had “a few bad apples. “

The open defense of an organization that has been deemed a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center is one extreme example of an increasingly public reactionary streak in Silicon Valley that diverges from the tech industry’s image as a bastion of liberalism. Some libertarian, centrist, and right-leaning Silicon Valley investors and executives, who wield outsize influence, power and access to capital, describe tech culture as under siege by activist employees pushing a social justice agenda.

Curtis Yarvin, dubbed a “favorite philosopher of the alt-right” by the Verge, has become a familiar face on the invite-only audio social network Clubhouse,

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Biden leads Trump by 6 points in Michigan and Nevada, race tied in Iowa: poll

Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenDemocratic poll shows neck-and-neck race brewing in Florida House district Nebraska district could prove pivotal for Biden in November Bringing Black men back home MORE holds a steady lead over President TrumpDonald John TrumpNorth Korea unveils large intercontinental ballistic missile at military parade Trump no longer considered a risk to transmit COVID-19, doctor says New ad from Trump campaign features Fauci MORE in the key battlegrounds of Michigan and Nevada, while the race remains a dead head in Iowa, according to a new poll.

A CBS News-YouGov tracking poll taken between Oct. 6 and Oct. 9 found Trump trailing Biden by 6 points among registered voters in Michigan and Nevada, 52 percent to 46 percent in both states. In Iowa, both candidates registered support from 49 percent of registered voters.

The polls paint a bleak picture for the president, whose 2016 victory was

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Wardlaw+Hartridge students plan race and identity symposium

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When is the last time the overtime you received was more than your salary? Check to see what public employees earned in overtime now on Data.MyCentralJersey.com.

Bridgewater Courier News

Matthew Hartzler, Arthur L. Johnson High School senior, recently earned a merit scholarship with a value of $30,000 per year through the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Medal Program. The Rensselaer scholarship is awarded to outstanding math and science students. 

Matthew Hartzler, Arthur L. Johnson High School senior and scholarship recipient. (Photo: ~Courtesy of Clark Public School District)

According to Rensselaer, a university based in Troy, New York, the medal was ”first presented in 1916 with two purposes: to recognize the superlative academic achievement of young men and women, and to motivate students toward careers in science, engineering, and technology.”

School Counselor Molly Cusick stated, “Matt is a very hard-working student that always looks to take on new challenges, both academically

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U.S. space mining policies may trigger regulatory ‘race to the bottom,’ scientists warn

Oct. 8 (UPI) — In a newly published policy paper, a pair of Canadian scientists warn that the United States is angling to establish itself as the de facto gatekeeper of the moon and other celestial bodies.

Earlier this year, NASA published a new set of rules for lunar mining and other space activities, dubbing the voluntary guidelines the “Artemis Accords.”

Aaron Boley and Michael Byers, authors of the new Science paper, argue that the Artemis Accords are part of a concerted effort by the U.S. and NASA to set a legal precedent for space-based resource extraction.

“It’s not the Artemis Accords alone that are problematic,” Michael Byers, professor of global politics and international law at the University of British Columbia, told UPI in an email. “Rather, it’s the ongoing and concerted U.S. diplomatic effort to promote national regulation of space mining and to proceed with resource extraction before a

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The New Space Race Is Fusion Energy

Space is exciting.  The idea of finding life elsewhere in the solar system or visiting another planet captures the imagination.  Private companies like SpaceX getting involved to carry cargo and now crew to the International Space Station are freeing up NASA scientists to focus on more ambitious goals.  The sense of exploration, the grand challenge, inspires us to achieve the incredible.

But the grand challenge of our generation is not space.  It’s not getting to Mars, though that is exciting and will undoubtedly lead to numerous technological advances.  Our new space race is a planetary one—our race to reliable, sustainable energy. And the energy of the stars—fusion—is our great hope.  

Why fusion?

Fusion safely produces energy with no greenhouse gases and no long-lived radioactive waste.  The waste product

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Britain Is Getting Ready for Its Space Race

Cornwall, in England’s far southwest, is known for antique fishing villages and snug, cliff-lined beaches. Soon it may be the scene of something very different: a small but growing space industry.

One day in a year or two, a modified Boeing 747 is expected to lift off from the long runway at the region’s airport, head out over the Atlantic Ocean and soar into the stratosphere. There, a rocket will drop from below a wing, fire its engines and ferry a load of small satellites into orbit, while the plane returns to the airport.

After six years of planning and fund-raising, construction of a bare-bones spaceport, budgeted at about 22 million pounds ($28 million), is beginning this month at the airport in Newquay.

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Task force: U.S. must prioritize AI in race to defend against Russia, China

A bipartisan congressional task force this week recommended that the Department of Defense prioritize investing in artificial intelligence, supply chain resiliency and cyberwarfare in order to deal with imminent threats from China and Russia.

The Future of Defense Task Force, chaired by Reps. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., and Jim Banks, R-Ind., on Tuesday released an 87-page report pointing out the vulnerabilities in U.S. national security and recommending how to fix them.

Banks said in a statement that the Pentagon needs to innovate to ensure the United States maintains its global military supremacy, and the report was the roadmap to do it.

“This report details a vision of the future of defense–specifically a smart, whole-of-nation strategy addressing the rise of China,” he said.

The U.S. economic and military dominance post-Cold War has been reduced in recent years, the report said. China is expected to soon overtake the United States as the world’s

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‘We need science to be the place of trust’: How politics undermined the vaccine race

With Zachary Brennan, David Lim and Lauraine Genota

— “We need science to be the place of trust.” What happened with the vaccine guidance.

Trump’s importation plan is here with savings TBD.

Science academies sound the alarm on political interference with Covid-19 vaccines.

It’s Friday, welcome back to Prescription Pulse. Happy birthday, Hatch-Waxman Act! H/t Zachary Brennan for the reminder. As always, send pharma tips and news to [email protected] or @owermohle. Loop in David Lim ([email protected] or @davidalim) and Zachary Brennan ([email protected] or @ZacharyBrennan)!

WHAT HAPPENED WITH THE VACCINE GUIDANCE? FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn spent weeks preparing a proposal to set more stringent standards for emergency authorization

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