Five new Mac models pop up in regulatory documents, suggesting imminent release

An international regulator is showing five unannounced Apple Mac models running macOS Big Sur, although unusually, the new listing also includes multiple Macs and iOS devices that have previously been registered.

Four new entries in the Eurasian Economic Commission’s regulatory database together list a total of 64 Apple devices — though only five have not appeared before. It’s unusual to see so many re-listings, and the EEC database does not explain them, but the new devices are required to be listed before they can go on sale.

All five of the entirely new entries are Macs listed, in translation, as “personal computers of the Apple trademark, and spare parts for it.” They are running “macOS software version 11.0.” These new devices have the model numbers A2348, A2438, A2439, A2337, and A2338.

Also listed and not yet released are Macs with macOS Big Sur model numbers A2147, A2158, and A2182. These

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U.S. space mining policies may trigger regulatory ‘race to the bottom,’ scientists warn

Oct. 8 (UPI) — In a newly published policy paper, a pair of Canadian scientists warn that the United States is angling to establish itself as the de facto gatekeeper of the moon and other celestial bodies.

Earlier this year, NASA published a new set of rules for lunar mining and other space activities, dubbing the voluntary guidelines the “Artemis Accords.”

Aaron Boley and Michael Byers, authors of the new Science paper, argue that the Artemis Accords are part of a concerted effort by the U.S. and NASA to set a legal precedent for space-based resource extraction.

“It’s not the Artemis Accords alone that are problematic,” Michael Byers, professor of global politics and international law at the University of British Columbia, told UPI in an email. “Rather, it’s the ongoing and concerted U.S. diplomatic effort to promote national regulation of space mining and to proceed with resource extraction before a

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Regulatory Technology Strives for New Era of Effective Governance

Regtech, short for regulatory technology, is a category of software solutions that helps its business customers to manage and de-risk compliance with the regulatory obligations of their respective industries. By its nature, regtech seeks first to understand and then to simplify and manage the highly complex laws written to regulate industry. While the right seeks to free business to grow and the left seeks to protect citizens and consumers, a good regtech solution supports both sides with technology that ensures compliance with the law while minimizing the resources necessary to do so.

Consider regulatory control over the financial services industry as a prime example from modern history. Speculative investment soared during the roaring twenties while production waned and unemployment rose. Over the decade, the stock market became increasingly over-valued and consumers took on more and more debt as banks turned a blind eye to obvious risk and over-leveraged cash

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Anti-drone tech’s tangled regulatory landscape

Staff test a system to keep drones away from Beijing Daxing International Airport on July 12, 2019, before putting the technology into service.

The market, and the military, have yet to settle on the best way to stop a drone.

Relatively small, easy-to-acquire drones have been implicated in everything from attempted political assassinations, to airspace incursions that have forced major airports to shut down, to smuggling contraband into prisons. The widespread availability of easy-to-pilot drones with good camera capabilities raises security issues that have fueled a growing market for technology to stop such remotely piloted aircraft.

While regulations for the flying of drones are far more settled in 2020 than they were in 2010, the regulatory landscape for technology to stop them is more unsettled. While many technologies exist that can variously track, identify, and disable drones in flight, these countermeasures risk either jeopardizing communications, violating Federal Communications Commission rules,

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