Quality research in Africa matters more than ever — for the whole world

We are at a unique moment in history. Two particular, ongoing events stand out. COVID-19 is one. The other is a long-overdue recognition of inequities among people in the US and worldwide, as exemplified by the Black Lives Matter movement. These issues provide a useful, timely lens through which to consider the role and value of African research.

There are many levels on which the future of the world, not just Africa’s, rests on African research. First, Africa represents the youngest and fastest growing population in the world. This makes intellectual investment an imperative, to harness talent that is a significant and growing share of the global population.

Second, Africans represent the oldest and most diverse genome in the world. Human genetics research has the potential to reveal some of the small differences in our genes that are influential in determining what makes Africa more susceptible or resistant to certain

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UAE experts turn the focus on latest research in rain enhancement science

The National Center of Meteorology announces on Wednesday targeted research areas for the UAE Rain Enhancement Program’s fourth cycle Projects.
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Abu Dhabi: UAE scientists will focus on new areas of research on rain enhancement, including using artificial intelligence in weather forecasting, to improve the country’s ability to address water-stress issues, it was announced on Wednesday.

The updated research areas include advances in weather modelling and forecasting using artificial intelligence and ensemble modelling; evaluation of rain enhancement effectiveness through the use of cloud chamber and use of randomised inputs in statistical methods; innovations in rain enhancement systems through the use of new measurement and numerical tools; and testing and leveraging several rain enhancement models.

Financial grant

Meanwhile, the programme will continue to support previous areas of research, locally and globally, to help the awardees fulfil the aims of their projects. Information about on-going projects funded by the programme and

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New research database can help shape the most effective and efficient response to COVID-19

Researchers around the world can tap into a new inter-disciplinary online database of COVID-19 research – allowing them to search for new partners, resources and funding to boost the global battle against the virus.

Launched today, the international open-access database for ongoing research activity COVID CORPUS aims to encourage collaboration and reduce duplication between researchers across all academic disciplines working on Covid-19 research.

Through its easy-to-use interface, the database will allow researchers and funders around the globe to coordinate, collaborate and network to help shape the most effective and efficient response to COVID-19 and its many impacts.

University of Birmingham experts in Computer Science and Medicine worked with the Institute for Global Innovation to create the database, which includes all disciplines of research, including health-related, socio-economic, behavioural, educational, cultural, science and technology.

Fighting COVID-19 requires the academic community to share ideas

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Research review determines aerosol-generating procedures that require enhanced personal protective equipment — ScienceDaily

Autopsy, airway suctioning and cardiopulmonary resuscitation are among the list of medical procedures that pose a risk of spreading COVID-19 from a patient to their health-care provider by creating aerosols, according to new research published in the journal BMJ Open Respiratory Research by an international team of experts including occupational health, preventive medicine and infectious disease specialists.

The team, led by University of Alberta medicine professor Sebastian Straube, carried out a systematic review of public health guidelines, research papers and policy documents from around the globe to determine which procedures are classified as aerosol-generating.

“What we sought to do was to understand which procedures generate aerosols and therefore require a higher grade of personal protective equipment,” said Straube, who also heads the preventive medicine division of the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry.

“Where there is 80 per cent agreement from a number of different source documents, we are reasonably confident

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Alion Awarded $73 Million Task Order to Provide Joint Training Synthetic Environment Research and Development

WASHINGTON, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The U.S. Navy has awarded Alion Science and Technology a $73 million task order with a 60-month period of performance to provide Joint Training Synthetic Environment (JTSE) Research and Development (R&D) for Joint Staff J7, Deputy Director Joint Training (JS J7 DDJT) Environment Architecture Division (EAD). Alion was awarded this contract under the Department of Defense Information Analysis Center’s (DoD IAC) multiple-award contract (MAC) vehicle. These DoD IAC MAC task orders (TOs) are awarded by the U.S. Air Force’s 774th Enterprise Sourcing Squadron to develop and create new knowledge for the enhancement of the DTIC repository and the R&D and S&T community.

“We are dedicated to our continued customer partnership to develop joint virtual environments to prepare for Joint All Domain Command and Control (JADC2),” said Katie Selbe, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Alion’s Cyber Network Solutions Group. “Alion has

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Science research and the lessons of World War II | American Enterprise Institute

World War II seems like a pretty obvious example of successful industrial policy, at least in the sense of government directing science research toward specific goals. This from the new working paper “Organizing Crisis Innovation: Lessons from World War II” by Daniel P. Gross and Bhaven N. Sampat: “The [Office of Scientific Research and Development]’s priorities were demand-driven, focused on solving specific military problems, and led by input from the Armed Services. The bulk of its work was applied in nature, and while basic studies were sometimes needed, the urgency of the crisis meant that it mostly had to take basic science as given and to put it to work.”

And Washington’s effort at Big Science produced many notable successes. In just a half-decade, the paper notes, there were major advances across a range of technologies: radar, electrical engineering, jet propulsion, optics, chemistry, and atomic fission. That final one, of

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This Is the Healthiest Possible Diet, According to Research

If you’re an entrepreneur who wants to maximize your energy and avoid an early death by eating healthy, there is a lot of confusing advice out there to contend with. Besides a host of trendy but conflicting diets, guidelines from actual scientists change regularly. 

One year fat will kill you, the next sugar is public enemy number one. Is fish great for you or mercury-laced poison? And while everyone agrees heavy drinking is unhealthy, does a glass or two of wine a day do good or bad things for your health? 

Given the ever-changing answers to questions like these, it’s tempting to throw up your hands and ignore everything but the most basic nutrition advice. If no one knows anything beyond fast food is bad, then you may as well let your instincts (and taste buds) guide you. 

But according to a research review published recently in the Journal of

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New research suggests innovative method to analyse the densest star systems in the Universe

New research suggests innovative method to analyse the densest star systems in the Universe
Artist’s illustration of supernova remnant Credit: Pixabay

In a recently published study, a team of researchers led by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) at Monash university suggests an innovative method to analyse gravitational waves from neutron star mergers, where two stars are distinguished by type (rather than mass), depending on how fast they’re spinning.


Neutron stars are extremely dense stellar objects that form when giant stars explode and die—in the explosion, their cores collapse, and the protons and electrons melt into each other to form a remnant neutron star.

In 2017, the merging of two neutron stars, called GW170817, was first observed by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave detectors. This merger is well-known because scientists were also able to see light produced from it: high-energy gamma rays, visible light, and microwaves. Since then, an average of three scientific studies on GW170817 have been published every

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Misinformation on Facebook is three times more popular than it was during the 2016 election, according to new research



Mark Zuckerberg wearing a suit and tie: Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Financial Services Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill October 23, 2019 in Washington, DC. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images


© Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Financial Services Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill October 23, 2019 in Washington, DC. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

  • Engagement on Facebook posts from misleading websites has spiked by 242 percent from 3Q of 2016 to 3Q of 2020, according to a new report from German Marshall Fund Digital.
  • Only 10 outlets, which researchers labeled as “False Content Producers” or “Manipulators,” were responsible for 62% of interactions. 
  • Facebook in the past has been slammed by civil rights leaders for inadequately handling the spread of misinformation on its platform.
  • Facebook’s attempts to moderate misinformation on the platform come into focus ahead of the US presidential election. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Engagement from misleading websites on Facebook has tripled since the 2016 US presidential election.

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The total number of user interactions

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Half of All UK Companies Fall Into Bottom Quadrant of Competitiveness, Posing Threat to UK’s Future Prosperity, New Research Reveals

LONDON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Oct 12, 2020–

A new model of competitiveness devised by academics at Goldsmiths, University of London in partnership with Microsoft scores almost half (46%) of UK firms in the lowest quadrant, posing a threat to Britain’s prosperity as organisations rally from the impact of COVID-19, and prepare for Brexit as UK-EU negotiations reach their conclusion.

The research finds that more than half (54%) of UK organisations surveyed have seen a decrease in revenue this year compared to last year, with more than one in five (22%) experiencing a drop greater than 15%. The same proportion (22%) had to scrap an existing business model within days of entering the UK’s first lockdown, and 45% of leaders surveyed expect their current business model will cease to exist in 5 years’ time – an increase of 12% over the past year.

However, the model also identifies minimal, rapid changes that UK organisations

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