Researchers have found connections in the brain to dissociative symptoms — ScienceDaily

Being traumatized can cause what are known as dissociative symptoms — such as experiencing amnesia, an out-of-body experience, feeling emotionally numb — which may help people cope. Experiencing these symptoms intensely or for a long time, however, can negatively impact an individual’s ability to function.

A team led by investigators at McLean Hospital has now found that brain imaging analyses can uncover changes in functional connections between brain regions linked to a specific individual’s dissociative symptoms following trauma. The findings, which have been published in The American Journal of Psychiatry, may be useful for tailoring treatments for affected patients.

For the study, the researchers applied a novel machine-learning (artificial intelligence) technique to functional magnetic resonance imaging tests of 65 women with histories of childhood abuse and current post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The technique, developed by one of the lead authors, Meiling Li, PhD, from Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical

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Researchers suggest providing mental health services to those with the greatest need — ScienceDaily

Experiencing multiple stressors triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic — such as unemployment — and COVID-19-related media consumption are directly linked to rising acute stress and depressive symptoms across the U.S., according to a groundbreaking University of California, Irvine study.

The report appears in Science Advances, published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

“The pandemic is not hitting all communities equally,” said lead author E. Alison Holman, UCI professor of nursing. “People have lost wages, jobs and loved ones with record speed. Individuals living with chronic mental and physical illness are struggling; young people are struggling; poor communities are struggling. Mental health services need to be tailored to those most in need right now.”

In addition, the research highlights the connection between mental health and exposure to media coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic, suggesting the need to step away from the television, computer or smartphone to protect

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Will technology save humanity? Researchers gather at global summit on bleeding-edge tech for good

Brilliant minds have shaped the course of human history. From the astrolabe to the internet, innovation has been a defining trait of our species. Now, with the Western world on the edge of what, at times, seems like an apocalyptic future, can we harness humanity’s super intelligence and create tech that benefits the species as a whole rather than destroying the planet to line the pockets of a few?

“Some huge, big, fundamental change has to happen to sustain our long-term development of ideas and, basically, for the sake of human beings,” said Kazuhiro Gomi (pictured), president and chief executive officer of NTT Research Inc.

Gomi spoke with Jeff Frick, host of theCUBE, SiliconANGLE Media’s livestreaming studio, during Upgrade 2020, the NTT Research Summit. They discussed basic research, NTT’s operational goals, and the Upgrade 2020 summit. (* Disclosure below.)

Basic research focuses on fundamental core technology that drives change

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Researchers have developed an eco-friendly zero-cement concrete, which all but eliminates corrosion — ScienceDaily

Researchers from RMIT University have developed an eco-friendly zero-cement concrete, which all but eliminates corrosion.

Concrete corrosion and fatbergs plague sewage systems around the world, leading to costly and disruptive maintenance.

But now RMIT engineers have developed concrete that can withstand the corrosive acidic environment found in sewage pipes, while greatly reducing residual lime that leaches out, contributing to fatbergs.

Fatbergs are gross globs of congealed mass clogging sewers with fat, grease, oil and non-biodegradable junk like wet wipes and nappies, some growing to be 200 metres long and weighing tonnes.

Billion-dollar savings

These build-ups of fat, oil and grease in sewers and pipelines, as well as general corrosion over time, costs billions in repairs and replacement pipes.

The RMIT researchers, led by Dr Rajeev Roychand, created a concrete that eliminates free lime — a chemical compound that promotes corrosion and fatbergs.

Roychand said the solution is more durable than

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ITMO Researchers Develop Unique Printing Technology for ‘Invisible’ Images

IMAGE

IMAGE: The colorful optical response from the printed image can be easily observed through any LCD screen, including that of a smartphone. These watermarks could potentially be used for added security…
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Credit: Dmitry Lisovsky, ITMO.NEWS

ITMO Researchers Develop Unique Printing Technology for ‘Invisible’ Images

Researchers from ITMO University’s ChemBio Cluster have developed an inkjet printing technology that makes it possible to produce images that can only be seen in polarized light – such as when using a smartphone screen. The new technology will help manufacturers protect their products from forgery. An article concerning the technology was published in ACS Applied Material Interfaces.

In order to achieve these results, the researchers have spent 5 years working on a way to use solution chemistry methods to apply high-resolution organized nanostructures. In large part, the ability to produce images invisible to the naked eye is thanks to the creation of special

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Three UB researchers receive National Science Foundation CAREER awards

From the science of taste to transistor technology to understanding plate tectonics and volcanoes, the funded projects will address issues of societal importance

Release Date: September 28, 2020

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Three University at Buffalo researchers have received the National Science Foundation’s CAREER award, one of the nation’s most prestigious honors for early-career scientists and engineers.

CAREER grants provide investigators with funding to conduct research and to develop educational programming in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) for K-12 students, university students and members of the public.

UB’s 2020 recipients are Margarete Jadamec, PhD, in UB’s Department of Geology and the Institute for Computational and Data Sciences; Huamin Li, PhD, in UB’s Department of Electrical Engineering; and Ann-Marie Torregrossa, PhD, in UB’s Department of Psychology.

Their projects will focus, respectively, on plate tectonics in the Pacific Rim of Fire; 2D materials for novel transistors; and the science of taste and

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Researchers develop unique printing technology for ‘invisible’ images

Researchers Develop Unique Printing Technology for ‘Invisible’ Images
Credit: Dmitry Lisovsky, ITMO

Researchers from ITMO University’s ChemBio Cluster have developed an inkjet printing technology that makes it possible to produce images that can only be seen in polarized light—such as when using a smartphone screen. The new technology will help manufacturers protect their products from forgery. An article concerning the technology was published in ACS Applied Material Interfaces.


In order to achieve these results, the researchers have spent five years working on a way to use solution chemistry methods to apply high-resolution organized nanostructures. In large part, the ability to produce images invisible to the naked eye is due to the creation of special colloidal ink based on nanoscale cellulose particles capable of orienting themselves on a surface in a special manner.

“The market for printing materials that can protect products from forgery and counterfeiting is growing at a geometric rate. To that end, manufacturers use various

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Time Travel Theoretically Possible Without Leading To Paradoxes, Researchers Say : NPR

A dog dressed as Marty McFly from Back to the Future attends the 25th Annual Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade in 2015. New research says time travel might be possible without the problems McFly encountered.

Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images


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Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

A dog dressed as Marty McFly from Back to the Future attends the 25th Annual Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade in 2015. New research says time travel might be possible without the problems McFly encountered.

Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

“The past is obdurate,” Stephen King wrote in his book about a man who goes back in time to prevent the Kennedy assassination. “It doesn’t want to be changed.”

Turns out, King might have been onto something.

Countless science fiction tales have explored the paradox of what would happen if you do something in the past that endangers

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Researchers developed a smart suit that is wirelessly powered by a smartphone

Researchers from NUS have developed a smartphone-powered suit that is capable of providing athletes with physiological data, including information on their posture, running gait, and body temperature while they are performing. The team says athletes are always looking for new ways to push human performance and to be able to improve the need to know their current limits objectively so they can overcome them. Current ways that athletes can track performance include wearables, such as the Apple Watch or Fitbit.

Better performing systems are available, but typically include tangles of wire and are too bulky to be used outdoors. The researchers sat about developing a system optimized for collecting data on athletes in the outdoor environment during performance using multiple sensors at different points on the body. One major goal was to reduce the system’s bulk, weight, and wires to an absolute minimum.

The researchers came up with a wearable

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Faced with shortages, researchers combine heat and humidity to disinfect N95 masks — ScienceDaily

As the COVID-19 pandemic swept around the world early this year, shortages of protective equipment such as N95 masks left healthcare workers little choice but to reuse the masks they had — increasing the risk of infection for both them and their patients.

Now, researchers at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University and the University of Texas Medical Branch may have a solution: Using a combination of moderate heat and high relative humidity, the team was able to disinfect N95 mask materials without hampering their ability to filter out viruses.

What’s more, it should not be too difficult to turn the new results into an automated system hospitals could use in short order — because the process is so simple, it might take just a few months to design and test a device.

“This is really an issue, so if you can find a way to

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