Scientists return from Arctic with wealth of climate data

BERLIN (AP) — An icebreaker carrying scientists on a year-long international effort to study the high Arctic has returned to its home port in Germany carrying a wealth of data that will help researchers better predict climate change in the decades to come.

The RV Polarstern arrived Monday in the North Sea port of Bremerhaven, from where she set off more than a year ago prepared for bitter cold and polar bear encounters — but not for the pandemic lockdowns that almost scuttled the mission half-way through.

“We basically achieved everything we set out to do,” the expedition’s leader, Markus Rex, told The Associated Press by satellite phone as it left the polar circle last week. “We conducted measurements for a whole year with just a short break.”

The ship had to break away from its position in the far north for three weeks in May to pick up supplies

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Full return for Weston’s younger students raises staffing issues

WESTON — Students are expected to fully return at the lower levels later this month, raising concerns for the school board about what that means for those still distance learning.

The Board of Education supported the lower schools switching to fully in-person and expanding the middle school’s hybrid learning to a full day beginning Oct. 26. But members raised concerns the plan the district’s administration presented Thursday could require additional staffing dedicated to distance learning. The high school would remain in its hybrid early-dismissal model.

“While in this document we are recommending hybrid full day, our energies are substantially on getting everybody back in,” Superintendent William McKersie said at a BOE meeting Thursday. “We want everybody back in — certainly K-5 we want them back in and that’s what the document is saying.”

The possibility of having to hire additional staff to designate teachers for the voluntary distance learning program

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After 3,000 years, Tasmanian devils return to mainland Australia

The pitter-patter of Tasmanian devil feet was heard in the wild of mainland Australia for the first time in 3,000 years, after a group of devils was released in Barrington Tops, a protected national park about 120 miles (200 kilometers) north of Sydney.

Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world’s largest carnivorous marsupial, have been long gone from most of the Australian continent, and until now the only remaining wild populations were on the island of Tasmania. Mainland devils were likely outcompeted by dingos, the wild dogs that were introduced to Australia at least 3,500 years ago, and which are now considered a pest species.

However, a decade of dingo eradication has offered Tasmanian devils a second chance. By clearing out dingos and reintroducing devils to Barrington Tops, conservationists hope to not only reestablish thriving wild populations of the iconic marsupials, but to also help protect other native

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Waiting For The Return Of Foreign Real Estate Buyers

The coronavirus pandemic has dramatically affected the Cypriot real estate market. The sector has traditionally been highly dependent on foreign buyers, especially in recent years due to the impact of the ‘golden passports’ investment program.

As shown in the semi-annual report of Pandora Investments Public, sales during the pandemic amounted to approximately $41 million, compared to $62.4 million in 2019. Pandora is a part of Leptos Group, one of the largest land developers in Cyprus.

Similarly, the gross sales of Aristo Developers Ltd, declined by 69% between January-June 2020, compared to the same period in 2019. The decline was “primarily due to the worldwide travel restrictions imposed following the COVID-19 pandemic which made it impossible

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India’s drug authority approved paper-strip Covid-19 test that could return results within hour

India’s drug authority last month approved a paper-strip test for Covid-19 that shows results in less than an hour, the head of the government institute that invented the test told CNN on Monday.



a person in a blue dress: A resident is tested for coronavirus in Mumbai.


© PUNIT PARANJPE/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
A resident is tested for coronavirus in Mumbai.

The test, called FELUDA—an acronym for FNCAS9 Editor-Limited Uniform Detection Assay—was named after a popular Indian fictional detective. It intends to “address the urgent need for accurate mass testing,” according to a statement from TATA Sons, which manufactured the test.

The kit could be manufactured for self-testing in the future, according to Agarwal, but the prototype being developed currently is only intended for testing in labs.

The FELUDA test follows a similar rapid test kit developed in the US this spring. Both tests use a gene-editing technology called CRISPR to detect the virus in a patient’s RNA. The US Food and Drug

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Tasmanian devils return to mainland Australia for first time in 3,000 years

It’s been 3,000 years since the Tasmanian devil’s raspy shriek rang through the forests of mainland Australia. But now, thanks to a dogged reintroduction effort, 26 of these endangered tiny terrors have returned.

No bigger than a lapdog, these marsupials are famous for their ferocity and powerful jaws, which can reduce large carcasses to smithereens in minutes. But in the 1990s, the species was hit with a contagious and deadly mouth cancer, causing its only remaining wild population, on the Australian island state of Tasmania, to drop to just 25,000 animals.

It’s unknown why the species disappeared from Australia millennia ago, but it’s likely due to human actions—when early hunters killed off most of the continent’s megafauna, the devils had nothing left to eat.

As scavengers, devils play a crucial role in maintaining a balanced, healthy ecosystem—which is why scientists have been trying so hard to bring them back.

“We’ve

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Falcons will use high-tech drones to clean Mercedes-Benz Stadium once fans return

MLS: Sporting Kansas City at Atlanta United FC
USATSI

The 0-3 Atlanta Falcons’ second-half play this season has been anything but clean, but now with the help of some high-tech drones, at least their stadium will be spotless. The team and Mercedes-Benz Stadium have partnered with Charlotte-based Lucid Drone Technologies for D1 disinfecting drones to sanitize the stadium. They will use two drones to sanitize the 71,000-seat area, with a third on deck if needed.

To get everything in the space clean, the drones use electrostatic spraying nozzles that allows for “medical-grade disinfecting chemicals” to be spread in the stadium, according to ESPN. The move to use these drones comes as the team plans to welcome back fans at a limited capacity in October, starting on the 11th when they host the Carolina Panthers.

“This stadium is incredibly large, and as we begin to slowly welcome fans back, these drones allow us to maximize the time between games

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Google Commits To Future Hardware Building And Hints At Soli Return

Google has reiterated its commitment to continue building hardware in the future. A blog post by Senior Vice President of Devices & Services Rick Osterloh confirms this.

Osterloh opened and closed Google’s Launch Night In event. There he announced the Pixel 5 and 4A 5G to much fanfare.

He also hinted at Soli Radar and Motion sensor would be making a return to hardware the in near future. The technology took Google a long while to develop to is was interesting to see no sign of it at this year’s event.

Google reiterates commitment to building hardware

Like most years Osterloh summarized the theme for Launch Night In/Made by Google 2020 as reported by 9to5. Normally this sees him bang the drum about Google being helpful. However, alongside this, he also made the point about Google products becoming more affordable too.

He continued to not that Google would be “building

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Zilingo CFO Perry Resigns to Return to Citigroup for Tech Deals

The logo of Zilingo Pte is displayed on a window at the company's office in Singapore.

Photographer: Ore Huiying/Bloomberg

James Perry, chief financial officer of Singapore’s Zilingo Pte, has resigned from the online fashion marketplace, according to people familiar with the matter, marking a high-profile departure at the once-flourishing startup that has struggled since the coronavirus outbreak.

Perry will return to Citigroup Inc. as Singapore-based managing director and co-head of technology investment banking for Asia Pacific, the people said, asking not to identified because the information is private.

Zilingo didn’t immediately provide a comment. Perry declined to comment when reached on Monday.

The veteran dealmaker joined Zilingo about a year ago after the startup secured a funding from investors including Temasek Holdings Pte and Sequoia Capital in early 2019. Before that, Perry had served as managing director and head of technology investment banking for Citigroup in Asia

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NASA releases Artemis mission plans to return astronauts to the moon

  • NASA just unveiled its first full plan for its Artemis program, a series of missions to return people to the moon for the first time since 1972.
  • The program would launch an uncrewed mission around the moon in 2021, followed by a crewed moon flyby in 2023, then a lunar landing in 2024.
  • The plan also calls for NASA and other agencies to set up a lunar base. 
  • But NASA needs $28 billion over the next four years to make Artemis happen.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

NASA has released its first full plan for its Artemis missions, which aim to put the first woman on the moon and the first man since 1972. 

The plan calls for a lunar landing in 2024, but before that, NASA intends to launch two other missions to the moon to test its new Orion spacecraft.

“Our plan to land the first

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