NASA moon-landing technology hitches ride to space on Bezos rocket

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin space company launched a New Shepard rocket for a seventh time from a remote corner of Texas on Tuesday, testing new lunar-landing technology for NASA that could help put astronauts back on the moon.

The entire flight — barely skimming space with a peak altitude of 66 miles (106 kilometers) — lasted just 10 minutes. The booster landed vertically back at the launch complex after liftoff, and the capsule followed, parachuting onto the desert floor.

The capsule carried science experiments, including 1.2 million tomato seeds that will be distributed to schoolchildren around the U.S. and Canada, and tens of thousands of children’s postcards with space-themed drawings that will be returned to the young senders.

NASA’s navigation equipment for future moon landings was located on the booster. The sensors and computer — tested during the booster’s descent and touchdown — will hitch another

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The BlueSkySea B1M Motorcycle Camera System Keeps Two Digital Eyes On Your Ride

I got a couple of motorcycle video systems in for review this past summer, including the Thinkware M1 and this system, the Blueskysea B1M. Both get the job done in terms of recording activity around your motorcycle (or other types of vehicles), but there are some key differences.

At $159.99, the Blueskysea B1M is by far the less expensive of the two systems, but it still held up and performed well during a long test period, where it was installed on my scooter, a 2007 Yamaha Morphous 250. Similar to the Thinkware, it consists of two Sony-made 1080P HD cameras with 135 degree wide angle lenses that are tethered to a central hideable controller that records video to a micro SD card. There’s no screen with this system; videos are downloaded to your smartphone

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AI researchers challenge a robot to ride a skateboard in simulation

AI researchers say they’ve created a framework for controlling four-legged robots that promises better energy efficiency and adaptability than more traditional model-based gait control of robotic legs. To demonstrate the robust nature of the framework that adjusts to conditions in real time, AI researchers made the system slip on frictionless surfaces to mimic a banana peel, ride a skateboard, and climb on a bridge while walking on a treadmill. An Nvidia spokesperson told VentureBeat that only the frictionless surface test was conducted in real life because of limits placed on office staff size due to COVID-19. The spokesperson said all other challenges took place in simulation. (Simulations are often used as training data for robotics systems before those systems are used in real life.)

“Our framework learns a controller that can adapt to challenging environmental changes on the fly, including novel scenarios not seen during training. The learned controller is

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Thinkware’s Tough M1 Action Camera System Smooths Out Your Motorcycle Ride Videos

I reviewed a lot of dash cameras this summer and it was time to try something a little bit different: a dash cam for my motorcycle. The first one to arrive was the Thinkware M1 Motorsports Cam system. This system features two high definition video cameras in basically nuclear explosion-proof cases, a central control box with a built-in GPS antenna, and a wired remote control that goes on your handlebars. The system works just like a dash cam system in a car in that it is always recording once you start up your bike, but the remote control system lets you record longer sections of video if you want to capture a longer ride or a specific incident that happens in front of you. It

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