Satellite imagery from space agencies sought in search for missing Belle Isle woman

ORLANDO, Fla. – The family of a missing Belle Isle woman made a plea Tuesday for space agencies to provide satellite imagery as the search continues for Stephanie Hollingsworth.

There’s a $10,000 reward for information leading to Hollingsworth, who was last seen Sept. 25 at a Walmart shopping center at 5991 S. Goldenrod Road in Orlando.

Hollingsworth’s husband, Scott, and other family members held a news conference, along with Bill Moore, a retired Orlando police detective, who shared details about emerging technologies they want to use to help find Stephanie Hollingsworth’s 2000 Chevrolet Tahoe.

Moore said they’re seeking help from NASA, SpaceX, L3Harris Technologies, Microsoft, Amazon and Geospatial Enthusiasts.

“We can get lucky to have a satellite passing overhead to capture her either walking to the car or the car leaving that parking space,” Moore said. “The family requests the assistance of any corporation or individual to search stored satellite

Read More
Read More

SpaceX, L3Harris win missile-warning satellite contracts from US military

The U.S. military has picked SpaceX and L3Harris Technologies to build up a new missile-warning satellite system in space.

In separate contracts, SpaceX and L3Harris will each provide four infrared satellites devoted to missile tracking as part of the larger National Defense Space Architecture program. The contract, awarded by the Department of Defense’s Space Development Agency (SDA), gives $193.5 million to L3Harris and $149 million to SpaceX. The satellites should be ready by the end of fiscal year 2022. 

“The satellites will be able to provide missile tracking data for hypersonic glide vehicles, and the next generation of advanced missile threats,” Derek Tournear, SDA director, said in a statement.

Related: What is a ballistic missile and how does it work?

SpaceX, originally a launch provider using its Falcon rockets, has entered the satellite construction market with its Starlink constellation of internet satellites. The company has launched more

Read More
Read More

GHGSat lauds performance of methane-monitoring satellite

SAN FRANCISCO — GHGSat, the Canadian firm preparing to launch a constellation of methane-monitoring satellites, announced Oct. 8 that the sensor on its Iris satellite launched in early September detects methane emissions five times as well as Claire, its predecessor. 

GHGSat tested the Iris sensor by flying the satellite over a controlled methane release in Alberta, Canada. The company compared the sensor data with measurements captured by sensors on the ground and in an aircraft, according to an Oct. 8 news release.

“Satellites are complex devices and it takes time to fully characterize instruments and optimize processing software to filter out noise from the signal,” GHGSat CEO Stephane Germain said in a statement. “We have just begun that process with Iris. We expect Iris to attain 10 times better performance than Claire and are now even more confident that we will validate that performance in the coming weeks.”

GHGSat launched

Read More
Read More

Africa Wildlife Tracking Leverages ORBCOMM’s Satellite IoT Technology to Support Conservation Efforts Around the World

ORBCOMM and Africa Wildlife Tracking (AWT) in Action

AWT is leveraging ORBCOMM’s advanced satellite IoT technology to track and monitor animals of all sizes to support their conservation efforts.
AWT is leveraging ORBCOMM’s advanced satellite IoT technology to track and monitor animals of all sizes to support their conservation efforts.
AWT is leveraging ORBCOMM’s advanced satellite IoT technology to track and monitor animals of all sizes to support their conservation efforts.

Tracking and monitoring solutions help reduce poaching, protect endangered wildlife and deliver valuable insights into animal behavior for researchers and conservationists

ROCHELLE PARK, N.J., Oct. 07, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — ORBCOMM Inc. (Nasdaq: ORBC), a global provider of Internet of Things (IoT) solutions, today announced that Africa Wildlife Tracking (AWT), the leader in tracking wildlife, is leveraging ORBCOMM’s advanced satellite IoT technology to track and monitor animals of all sizes to support their conservation efforts. With the added threat of the COVID-19 pandemic and the need to supply local populations with food, poaching is likely to increase, making

Read More
Read More

World Space Week 2020 is celebrating satellite technology. Here’s how to watch.



background pattern: The poster for World Space Week 2020.


© Provided by Space
The poster for World Space Week 2020.

World Space Week 2020 kicks off today (Oct. 4) and will celebrate how satellites have changed humanity with a variety of online events to appeal to space enthusiasts and young students alike. 

The international celebration commemorates how space improves “the human condition”, according to the World Space Week website. The events stretch from Oct. 4 – the anniversary of first satellite Sputnik’s launch in 1957 – to Oct. 10, the anniversary of the signing of the Outer Space Treaty in 1967 that underlies space law.

Here is a rundown of the some events for World Space Week as part of Space Unites, a program by the Space Foundation. Please check the links for exact times of the live presentations closer to the date of your event. You can also find more events from around the world here.

Related: World

Read More
Read More

SpaceX aborts launch of GPS Space Force satellite with 2 seconds to go

SpaceX aborted a scheduled launch of a US military GPS satellite on Friday night with just about two seconds left in the countdown. The launch was scheduled for a 15-minute window that opened at 6:43 p.m. PT. All appeared to be proceeding smoothly, until two seconds before launch. SpaceX was just starting the engine ignition sequence when it stopped the clock.  



a crane next to a body of water: SpaceX shared this scenic view of the Falcon 9 that'll carry Space Force's GPS satellite into orbit. SpaceX


© Provided by CNET
SpaceX shared this scenic view of the Falcon 9 that’ll carry Space Force’s GPS satellite into orbit. SpaceX

“Standing down from tonight’s launch attempt of GPS III-4,” SpaceX tweeted a few minutes before 7 p.m. PT, though it didn’t say whether a ground or flight vehicle issue was to blame. The next launch window opens at 6:39 p.m. PT Saturday, SpaceX said. 

SpaceX and the US Space Force are getting along famously. Friday’s attempted launch in Florida follows a Space Force Falcon 9 launch in

Read More
Read More

SpaceX aborts launch of GPS Space Force satellite with two seconds to go

SpaceX aborted a scheduled launch of a US military GPS satellite from Florida on Friday night with just about two seconds left in the countdown. The launch was scheduled for a 15-minute window that opened at 6:43 p.m. PT, with the weather forecast at 70% favorable for liftoff. All appeared to be proceeding smoothly, until two seconds before launch. SpaceX was just starting the engine ignition sequence when it stopped the clock.  



a crane next to a body of water: SpaceX shared this scenic view of the Falcon 9 that will carry Space Force's GPS satellite into orbit. SpaceX


© Provided by CNET
SpaceX shared this scenic view of the Falcon 9 that will carry Space Force’s GPS satellite into orbit. SpaceX



a large crane in front of a sunset: SpaceX shared this scenic view of the Falcon 9 that will carry Space Force's GPS satellite into orbit. 


© SpaceX

SpaceX shared this scenic view of the Falcon 9 that will carry Space Force’s GPS satellite into orbit. 


“Standing down from tonight’s launch attempt of GPS III-4,” SpaceX tweeted a few minutes before 7 p.m. PT, though it did not say whether a ground or flight vehicle issue was to blame. The

Read More
Read More

SpaceX scrubs Starlink satellite launch Thursday due to ground sensor reading

egxpl5rucaatfpr

A Falcon 9 blasts off on Aug. 30.


SpaceX

The Falcon 9 rocket booster that sent NASA astronauts to the International Space Station in May is set to get recycled again when SpaceX sends 60 more Starlink satellites to orbit atop its column of fire, but it didn’t happen Thursday as planned. 

The launch, originally scheduled for September, has been postponed multiple times due to weather, including on Monday morning when heavy clouds above Florida’s Cape Canaveral prevented launch at the last second. On Thursday, another launch was scrubbed 18 seconds before blastoff due to an aberrant ground sensor reading. A new target launch date has not yet been announced. 

“All in a day’s work for the launch team. They’ll investigate, diagnose probable cause, fix the problem, and get us ready for the next launch

Read More
Read More

Satellite data reveal variability in intensity of groundwater use for different crops, a boon for irrigation policymaking across the state — ScienceDaily

Researchers at the University of California San Diego report in a new study a way to improve groundwater monitoring by using a remote sensing technology (known as InSAR), in conjunction with climate and land cover data, to bridge gaps in the understanding of sustainable groundwater in California’s San Joaquin Valley.

Their work could be revolutionary for managing groundwater use in agricultural regions around the world, as groundwater monitoring and management have been notoriously difficult to carry out due to lack of reliable data.

The satellite-based InSAR (interferometric synthetic aperture radar) is used to make high-resolution maps of land surface motion in space and time, including measurement of subsidence (or sinking). Subsidence can occur when large amounts of groundwater are removed from underground stores, called aquifers.

The study, published in the journal Environmental Research Letters, took advantage of the incredibly fine-scale resolution of InSAR to evaluate subsidence patterns according to crop

Read More
Read More

SpaceX aborts Starlink satellite launch attempt

NASA Astronaut Chris Cassidy, serving as commander of the Expedition 63 mission aboard the International Space Station, took these photos of Hurricane Laura as it continued to strengthen in the Gulf of Mexico on August 25. Photo courtesy of NASA | License Photo

Read More
Read More