Forbes School of Business & Technology’s Center for Women’s Leadership Launches New Mentoring Program

Forbes School of Business & Technology’s Center for Women’s Leadership Launches New Mentoring Program

PR Newswire

SAN DIEGO, Oct. 1, 2020

SAN DIEGO, Oct. 1, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The Forbes School of Business & Technology’s Center for Women’s Leadership (CWL) will launch its Mentoring Program on Friday, October 2, 2020 at noon PT during CWL’s virtual webinar Developing Curiosity, the Key to Successful Women’s Leadership.

The new Mentoring Program supports CWL’s vision and mission of fostering productive, development-focused relationships between successful women leaders and Ashford University students and alumni. CWL focuses on strengthening the leadership capacity and competence of female leaders to support leadership in the university, organizations, and communities worldwide.

In partnership with Ashford’s peer mentoring initiatives, CWL’s Mentoring Program offers 10 weeks of guided reflection, conversation, and application ideas designed to empower future women leaders by: developing their commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion, and empowerment; increasing their

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Confidential information released after school district refused to pay hackers’ ransom demand, report says

Hackers may have gained access to confidential information about current and former staff and students of the fifth largest school district in the United States, according to a statement posted on the district’s website.



a school bus is parked on the side of a road: Hackers compromised confidential information from past and present staff and students of Clark County School District (CCSD), according to a statement posted on the school's website.


© Shutterstock
Hackers compromised confidential information from past and present staff and students of Clark County School District (CCSD), according to a statement posted on the school’s website.

The Clark County School District (CCSD) in Las Vegas reopened for in-person learning on August 24. It was attacked by hackers three days later in an incident first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

On the morning of August 27, according to the statement, certain computer systems from CCSD became infected with a virus that prohibited access to certain files. The Wall Street Journal reports that hackers published documents containing Social Security numbers, student grades and other private information from CCSD students and staff after officials refused

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Nevada school district refuses to submit to ransomware blackmail, hacker publishes student data

A cybercriminal has published private data belonging to thousands of students following a failed attempt to exhort a ransomware payment from a Nevada school district.

Ransomware is a form of malware that can have a devastating impact on businesses and individuals alike. 

Once a ransomware package has landed and executed on a vulnerable system, files are usually encrypted, access to core systems and networks is revoked, and a landing page is thrown up demanding a payment — usually in cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin (BTC) or Monero (XMR) in return for a decryption key — which may or may not work.   

See also: Ransomware is your biggest problem on the web. This huge change could be the answer

Ransomware operators target organizations across every sector in the hopes that the fear of disrupting core operations will pressure victims into paying up. It may not be a valid legal expense, but for

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Former teacher opens new private school in Woodlands

Published

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What a school day is like for Kansas City third graders

Katherine Hendrix sits alone in her third grade classroom at J.A. Rogers Elementary School, speaking to a TV filled with her students’ faces.

“Good morning; you’re up early today,” she tells one boy as more boxes outlining students’ faces appear on the 65-inch-screen. She asks if he’s tired. A girl a few squares over eats yogurt.

Hendrix, 34, asks if one student found his iPad yet. He said no. He’s borrowing his brother’s Chromebook, but he can’t figure out how to access his homework. He gets his 9-year-old brother, who tells Hendrix he knows how to use the laptop, but then immediately struggles.

“What the heck?” he said. “I’m on the Google page thingy.”

Family members bustle in and out of the back of some frames. Another teacher’s voice echoes from a sibling’s computer in the background.

Three weeks into the new remote school year, Hendrix’s classroom and others

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Depew School District using temperature wrist scanners to start new school year

The Depew Union Free School District has spent about $30,000 on new technology to detect whether anyone has a temperature.

DEPEW, N.Y. — Some local schools are already back in the classroom – others will return next week, and at one local district new technology is being used that’s intended to keep everyone safe.

The Depew Union Free School District will start the new year with Wrist temperature scanners at all their entrances. The wrist temperature scanners give you a reading in just five seconds.

“Every student, every employee has to pass by those scanners to get their temperature checked before they come in,” said Jeffrey Rabey, the Depew Schools superintendent. 

This on top of health screenings that should be done at home.

The district purchased 10 standing temperature scanners at a cost of nearly $30,000 using CARES Act funding, but according to the district superintendent, the manufacturer is backed

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Q&A: How to handle technology issues with online school

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How to handle technology issues with online school

NEW YORK (AP) — Across the U.S., the pandemic has forced students to attend virtual school to prevent spread of the coronavirus. But the more we rely on technology, the bigger the consequences when gadgets or internet service let us down.

Technology being technology, all sorts of things can go wrong. Your internet service may be inadequate for all-day videoconferencing or simply overstressed. Hardware and software can be confusing, can break, and sometimes just fails to work. There can be unanticipated consequences from turning on a new video camera in your home for school lessons.

Here are answers to some common questions from parents now forced to manage their kids’ virtual educations.

Q: We don’t have a computer/enough computers/fast enough internet service for online school. What do we do?

A: This affects millions of people, and there are no perfect solutions.

It’s possible to use smartphones as hotspots for computers,

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A 24-year-old game developer for Roblox who makes over $1 million a year shares how he started his own company after dropping out of school



a person smiling for the camera: Alex Hicks. Alex Hicks


© Provided by Business Insider
Alex Hicks. Alex Hicks

In 2010, Alex Hicks released his first video game on Roblox. Ten years later, he’s made more than $1 million a year as the owner of game development studio RedManta, which creates games for the popular kids platform and has since generated nearly one billion plays combined.

After several software engineering internships at Roblox, Hicks developed a solid understanding about game design, developer toolsets, and operations — a skill set that led him to quit college and develop games full time.

Now, he shares with Business Insider how embracing Roblox’s communities and focusing on efficiency helped him reach the million-dollar revenue mark in 2020.

“[A]t this point I’m feeling I’m much farther ahead than many of the people I know who graduated with game design degrees,” Hicks said. 

Video: Corsair CEO: Coronavirus Pandemic Has Brought More People Into Gaming (TheStreet)

Corsair

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School of Science and Technology-Bayshore welcomes students back for in person learning

The School of Science and Technology-Bayshore welcomed back students September 21 with a plan to keep everyone safe.

CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas — Students across the coastal bend continue to return to the classroom as more schools opened their doors for in-person learning. The School of Science and Technology-Bayshore welcomed back students Sept. 21.

“It was nice to have the kids come back, it’s been a very long time,” said Kathryn Trojanowski, a first grade teacher at the school.

It had been six months since the staff saw kids in the classroom. SST started the 2020-2021 school year online in August like many other districts in the coastal bend.

“One of the strategies we came up with was just to wait for the other ISD’s to start the school and then come up on board maybe a week or two after so we have that experience,” said Mehmet Guruz, the principal

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