Morgan Awarded $1.2 Million in Federal Science, Tech Grants

(Photos Courtesy of Morgan State University)

Morgan State University Obtains $1.2 Million in Federal Science, Technology Grants

NSF and NIH Funding Boosts Morgan’s School of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

BALTIMORE — Morgan State University’s (MSU’s) School of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences (SCMNS) has announced the receipt of four federal grants totaling more than $1.2 million, awarded in the spring and summer of 2020. The funds are supporting important research in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields ranging from pharmatechnology to advanced computing to meteorology to computer science instruction. Collectively, the grants indicate steady progress toward Morgan’s goal of attaining an R1 (“very high research”) designation from the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. MSU was elevated to an R2 (“high research”) Carnegie classification in December 2018.

“Receiving four grants by four different faculty members testifies to the quality of the faculty and their devotion to the

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CNN launches new series ‘Saved by the Future’ with leading names in science and technology exploring the innovations that will shape our future | Nachricht

HONG KONG, Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — This month, CNN launches ‘Saved by the Future’, a brand-new cross-platform series in which some of the biggest names in science and technology spotlight breakthrough innovations in mobility, automation, energy, sustainability and artificial intelligence that could transform our lives in decades to come.

In the first of three 30-minute shows, host Nicki Shieldsguides conversations with Bill NyeFabien Cousteau and Kathy Sullivan, who transport us to a world of future possibilities that once seemed like mere science fiction, in everything from mobility in space to electric drones that can predict the weather.

Shields first speaks with TV Star “The Science Guy”, climate change advocate and social media sensation Bill Nye about the future of space exploration. Nye is CEO of the Planetary Society, which successfully launched its LightSail 2 spacecraft in 2019. The spacecraft is powered by solar winds

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Jennifer Doudna, New Nobel Laureate, on Science and Covid

Good morning.

Last week, Nobel Prize season arrived.

Among the several winners with ties to California were two Stanford professors — Paul R. Milgrom and Robert B. Wilson, were awarded the Nobel in economic science — and three University of California scholars. Reinhard Genzel, a U.C. Berkeley professor emeritus of physics and astronomy, and Andrea Ghez, a U.C.L.A. professor of astrophysics, shared the prize in physics with a mathematician at Oxford University for their work on black holes.

And Jennifer Doudna, a U.C. Berkeley professor, shared the prize in chemistry with Emmanuelle Charpentier, now the director of the Max Planck Unit for the Science of Pathogens in Berlin, for their work on Crispr-Cas9, a method to edit DNA.

[See the full list of 2020 Nobel winners and read more coverage here.]

It’s the first time the award has gone to two women, and Dr. Doudna is the first woman

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How a 2nd-Grade Class Sent a Science Experiment to Space

Back in 2015, students in Maggie Samudio’s second-grade class at Cumberland Elementary School in West Lafayette, Ind., were contemplating an offbeat science question: If a firefly went to space, would it still be able to light up as it floated in zero gravity?

Ms. Samudio said she would ask a friend of hers, Steven Collicott, an aerospace professor at nearby Purdue University, for the answer.

“He teaches a class on zero gravity, and he would be the perfect person to answer the question,” Ms. Samudio recalled in an email.

A day later, Dr. Collicott replied, and Ms. Samudio was surprised by his answer: Instead of guessing, why not actually build the experiment and send it to space?

Blue Origin, the rocket company started by Jeffrey P. Bezos, chief executive of Amazon, was planning to offer the ability for schools to fly small experiments on its New Shepard suborbital spacecraft for

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Kummers Give $300 Million to Expand Missouri U. of Science and Technology Programs (Gifts Roundup)

A roundup of notable gifts compiled by the Chronicle:

Knight Foundation

Nike co-founder Phil Knight gave $900.7 million to his and wife Penelope’s foundation. The couple primarily support scientific and medical research at the University of Oregon, Oregon Health and Science University, and other large institutions. They have also given extensively to Stanford University, where Phil Knight earned an MBA in 1962.

University of Oregon

Phil Knight gave $300 million for ongoing support for many of the university’s programs to which he has donated in recent years. With this latest gift, he and his wife, Penelope, have donated at least $1.1 billion to the university since 2007, with much of it directed to scientific research and related programs.

Phil Knight earned a journalism degree from the university in 1959 and went on to co-found Nike, the sports-apparel company.

Kummer Institute Foundation

Fred and June Kummer gave $300 million to establish

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Why Scientists Should Stop Misusing Science To Influence The Election

Earlier this month, the editors of Scientific American, published an all-out, endorsement of Joe Biden for President—something unprecedented in the journal’s 175 year history. Then, last week, all of the New England Journal of Medicine’s editors signed a scathing review of the Trump administration’s handling of the COVID-19 emergency, calling for Trump to be voted out of office.

In truth, both editorials offer several valid criticisms of the administration on scientific grounds. And to be clear: The present article is not making any counter-endorsement of Donald Trump—far from it.

Rather, we pose an important question: Are high-profile scientists crossing a dangerous line by using their trusted platforms to influence the election? Based on behavioral science, we believe they are and their actions come at the risk of diminishing the public’s trust in

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Science research and the lessons of World War II | American Enterprise Institute

World War II seems like a pretty obvious example of successful industrial policy, at least in the sense of government directing science research toward specific goals. This from the new working paper “Organizing Crisis Innovation: Lessons from World War II” by Daniel P. Gross and Bhaven N. Sampat: “The [Office of Scientific Research and Development]’s priorities were demand-driven, focused on solving specific military problems, and led by input from the Armed Services. The bulk of its work was applied in nature, and while basic studies were sometimes needed, the urgency of the crisis meant that it mostly had to take basic science as given and to put it to work.”

And Washington’s effort at Big Science produced many notable successes. In just a half-decade, the paper notes, there were major advances across a range of technologies: radar, electrical engineering, jet propulsion, optics, chemistry, and atomic fission. That final one, of

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AB Science announces that results from masitinib study AB07015 in severe asthma have been …

Paris, 13 October 2020, 6pm

Results from masitinib study AB07015 in severe asthma selected for presentation at an American Thoracic Society (ATS) symposium held on 16th October, 2020

AB Science SA (Euronext – FR0010557264 – AB) today announced that results from masitinib study AB07015 in severe asthma have been selected for presentation at an upcoming American Thoracic Society (ATS) symposium.

The ATS Allergy, Immunology, and Inflammation Assembly will host a virtual symposium on October 16, 2020 at 10 am (Eastern Standard Time). This is a chaired virtual meeting during which selected abstracts from the ATS 2020 International Conference (ATS 2020 Virtual) are presented live with questions from moderators and audience.  

Pascal Chanez, Professor of Respiratory Diseases at Aix-Marseille University, France, will present the results of masitinib as a treatment of severe corticosteroid-dependent asthma.

Details for the presentation are as follows:

Session Title:                  Late Breaking Clinical Trials in Airway Diseases
Date

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Seven Los Alamos scientists and engineers honored as 2020 Laboratory Fellows | US Department of Energy Science News

12-Oct-2020

Tanmoy Bhattacharya, Christopher Fontes, Vania Jordanova, Thomas Leitner, John Lestone, Joseph Martz and Ralph Menikoff become part of a prestigious fellowship

DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

The 2020 Laboratory Fellows: top Row (left to right): Tanmoy Bhattacharya, Christopher Fontes, Vania Jordanova, and Thomas Leitner. Bottom Row (left to right): Ralph Menikoff, Joseph Martz, and John Lestone


LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Oct. 12, 2020–Seven Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists and engineers have been named 2020 Laboratory Fellows: Tanmoy Bhattacharya, Christopher Fontes, Vania Jordanova, Thomas Leitner, John Lestone, Joseph Martz and Ralph Menikoff.

“Recognizing the Fellows of Los Alamos National Laboratory is one of my proudest responsibilities. To be a Fellow is to be a leader at the Laboratory and within the scientific community at large,” said Thom Mason, director of Los Alamos National Laboratory. “Thank you to this year’s seven Fellows for their dedication and exceptional contributions.”

About

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