Johnson has ignored the science and blown our chance to stop a second wave

We shouldn’t be here. Back in June, England had the opportunity to suppress the virus. With a functional test and trace system, support to help people self-isolate, a robust set of regulations to keep work and leisure spaces safe and a clear public communications campaign, we could have suppressed coronavirus into the winter.



Boris Johnson in a suit and tie: Photograph: Toby Melville/AFP/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Toby Melville/AFP/Getty Images

But the opportunity was squandered. Worse, as restrictions were lifted on 4 July – what became known colloquially as “Freedom Saturday” – we were encouraged to relax, to travel back to work, to go to the pub, to mix and mingle. Meanwhile, the country’s dysfunctional, centralised and privately-run test and trace system lurched from one calamity to the next. World class? At failing to contact people and succeeding in losing data, perhaps.

The virus never went away. In some deprived communities, such as Bolton and Rochdale, infections remained

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3M Survey Reports Decline In Science Skepticism For First Time In 3 Years

Since 2018, 3M has launched an annual State of Science Index to track public attitudes towards science across the world. But for 2020, the company conducted two surveys, a Pre-Pandemic Wave and a Pandemic Pulse Wave survey, finding that science skepticism has declined for the first time in three years, and that there is an increased public understanding of the importance of science in our daily lives.

In the Pre-Pandemic Wave survey, representative samples of 1,000 adults (aged 18+) in 18 countries, including China, Mexico and the US, were asked to complete a 15-20 minute long survey to assess their attitude towards science. Among the pre-pandemic survey findings, there was a rise in science skepticism to 35%, from an original 29% in 2018.

“As the pandemic sort of

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Families Celebrate a Spooky Science & STEM Halloween

This post was contributed by a community member. The views expressed here are the author’s own.

The Cradle of Aviation Museum’s annual Family Science Nights return with the beloved “Spooky Science Night” with two socially-distant and limited attendance family sessions on Friday, October 30th at 5pm and 7pm. Each session is packed with stimulating family-fun, STEM activities and a Halloween parade to entertain the entire family. Tickets are $15.00 per person; $10 for Museum Members. All activities are included with admission. All tickets must be purchased in advance, no tickets will be sold at the door. Ideal for kids in grades K-5. Info is available at www.cradleofaviation.org/spook…

Activities include:

● Frankenstein Hands: Use your mad scientist skills to dissect frozen hands to discover what is trapped inside.

● Candy Catapults: Protecting your Halloween hoard is serious business. Construct and test your own catapults.

● Boo-Be-Gones: You ain’t afraid of

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Beyond Cyberpunk: The Intersection of Technology and Science Fiction

People with established careers are terrible sources of advice on how to break into their chosen field. When I was a baby writer, I attended numerous panels about getting established, where writers a generation or two older than me explained how to charm John W Campbell into buying a story for Astounding Stories. This was not useful advice. Not only had Campbell died six days before I was born, but he was also a fascist.

I have two careers, one in tech and the other in SF, a peanut-butter-and-chocolate combo that’s got a long history in the field, and I am often asked how to break into both fields. I know an awful lot about how to sell a story to Gardner Dozois, who stopped editing Asimov’s sixteen years ago and died two years ago, but I know nothing about pitching contemporary SF editors.

Likewise: I know an awful

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Thousands of people want to be exposed to coronavirus for science



a close up of a glass with a blue background: Coronavirus Vaccine


© Provided by BGR
Coronavirus Vaccine

  • Coronavirus vaccine research is advancing at an incredible pace, with some of the first results expected by the end of the year.
  • The UK government is actively exploring the idea of starting a challenge trial where volunteers would receive the experimental drug and then the virus.
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) already cleared the controversial testing method, but governments and vaccine makers are still reluctant to embark on research that would expose volunteers to a deadly pathogen.
  • Tens of thousands of people have signed up for challenge trials nonetheless.

There’s hope that vaccines combined with continued precautions (social distancing, hand washing, and face masks) can defeat the COVID-19 pandemic by the end of 2021. While we have no definitive proof that vaccines are effective and safe, there’s plenty of promising evidence to keep the hope alive. First of all, there are hundreds of coronavirus

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Assaults on science causing alarming and avoidable deaths in the U.S.

politician
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

COVID-19 is now the third leading cause of death in the United States only behind cardiovascular disease and cancer. The U.S. accounts for more than 20 percent of COVID-19 cases (more than 7.7 million) and deaths (more than 210,000) in the world today while comprising 4.25 percent of the global population.


In a commentary published online in EClinicalMedicine, researchers from Florida Atlantic University’s Schmidt College of Medicine and collaborators state that “pandemic politics” is causing assaults on science, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as well as the health of the public.

As an example, the authors point out that the FDA, a world renowned regulatory authority issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for hydroxychloroquine in the absence of any reliable data from large-scale randomized trials, all of which later showed no benefit and some

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The Mystery And Science Behind The Law Of Attraction

Transformational coach leveraging science & ancient wisdom to help people manifest their greatness. Blue Dot Transform Consulting

I fondly remember my graduation day, which was on the 25th of April. The master of ceremonies was going to announce the name of the student who bagged the title of best all-rounder for the postgraduate class of 2010. The award also entailed a cash prize worth $1,500.

I was hopeful of winning the title as I had worked tirelessly and visualized the entire scenario several times. “Mental rehearsal,” as scientists call it, is something that performers do quite often before a performance. Here, I was not going to perform something, but I was strongly intending to create an event that my mind had conceived. 

Lo and behold, my crazy thought manifested. As I went up to the stage and received the award, I was reliving each and every moment that I

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How to mandate agility in software development, operations, and data science

Even when leaders proclaim in their townhalls that your organization needs to be more agile and nimble, they can’t mandate it. Your CIO and IT leaders may standardize on practices, metrics, and responsibilities that they describe as agile methodology standards, but they can’t dictate that everyone adopts agile cultures and mindsets.

You can select agile tools, automate more with devops practices, and enable citizen data science programs, but you can’t force adoption and demand employee happiness. IT operations may operate a hybrid multicloud architecture, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that costs are optimized or that infrastructure can scale up and down auto-magically.

So, if you were looking to quickly standardize your agile processes, or to miraculously address technical debt by shifting to agile architectures, or to instantly transform into an agile way of working, then I am sorry to disappoint you. Agility doesn’t come free, cheap, or easily. You can’t

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UJ’s computer science and software engineering academy turns 50

Professor Basie von Solms, co-founder of the Academy for Computer Science and Software Engineering.

Professor Basie von Solms, co-founder of the Academy for Computer Science and Software Engineering.

One of SA’s first independent computer science schools, the Academy for Computer Science and Software Engineering (ACSSE) in the Faculty of Science at the University of Johannesburg (UJ), is celebrating 50 years.

Co-founded in 1970 by professors Sebastiaan “Basie” von Solms and Andries van der Walt, ACSSE has since attained global status for its programmes.

Van der Walt and Von Solms were the first two staff members of the academy and the latter was head of computer science for 27 years.

The academy has a strong international research record, and is currently concentrating on areas related to the fourth industrial revolution.

ACSSE is also now heavily involved in research, focusing on cyber security, cyber counter-intelligence, artificial intelligence, intelligent software agents, Web services and biometric applications.

Von Solms says the department has made significant progress in

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