Reflecting on My First Time in the Bergami Center of Science, Technology, and Innovation

I was excited to explore the University’s new Bergami Center for the first time, and I came away impressed by the collaborative spaces and cutting-edge technology it offers, as well as the way the building commemorates the University’s past, present, and future.

September 16, 2020

By: Hannah Providence ’22

The Love Resource Zone in the Bergami Center.

Today was a great day. I finally got to walk around campus for the first time in more than five months.

As a commuter student, I’m not at the University as often as I’d like to be, and I spend even more time at home now with my hybrid and online courses.

Hannah Providence in the Bergami Center.
Hannah Providence explores the Bergami Center for Science, Technology, and Innovation for the first time.

So, when Chris Fogarty ’21, my fellow communications media intern in the Office of Advancement, offered to give me a tour of the University’s new Bergami

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Ron Cobb, a Pioneer in Science Fiction Design, Dies at 83

Ron Cobb, the artist and movie production designer known for his work on the spaceship in “Alien,” the DeLorean in “Back to the Future,” and some tipsy aliens in “Star Wars,” died on Monday in Sydney, Australia.

He was 83. His death was confirmed by his wife, Robin Love. The cause was Lewy body dementia.

Mr. Cobb, a self-taught designer who worked largely behind the scenes, advanced an aesthetic that still influences the spaceships and time machines of today’s science fiction films: futuristic, yet retro; modular, but boundless; and bursting with meticulous detail.

“He was hugely influential to myself and many of my peers in the business,” said François Audouy, the production designer behind the 2019 movie “Ford v Ferrari” and the forthcoming “Ghostbusters: Afterlife.”

“His drawings were so infused with logic and realism,” Mr. Audouy said. “It just felt like his spaceships could take off at any moment.”

“Ron

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Study: New technology is a ‘science multiplier’ for astronomy

Federal funding of new technology is crucial for astronomy, according to results of a study released Sept. 21 in the Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments and Systems.

The study tracked the long-term impact of early seed funding obtained from the National Science Foundation. Many of the key advances in astronomy over the past three decades benefited directly or indirectly from this early seed funding.

Over the past 30 years, the NSF Advanced Technologies and Instrumentation program has supported astronomers to develop new ways to study the universe. Such devices may include cameras or other instruments as well as innovations in telescope design. The study traced the origins of some workhorse technologies in use today back to their humble origins years or even decades ago in early grants from NSF. The study also explored the impact of technologies that are just now advancing the state-of-the-art.

The impact of technology and instrumentation

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The messy science behind the coronavirus and opening schools

For example, much attention has focused on whether children transmit COVID-19 as often as adults. This is a difficult question to answer through the types of studies that can be done in most settings. A study from Korea suggested that older children transmitted COVID-19 to people living in their households at rates equal to or higher than adults, and was widely reported as jeopardizing safe school reopening. As in all contact tracing studies, differences in when symptoms appear and when tests are available made it difficult to tell who infected whom in a household. When the authors subsequently reported that the direction of transmission was unknown, raising concern about the conclusions of the original paper, this correction was not widely communicated.

A second recent study was tweeted out by the institution that conducted the research, overstating the findings as demonstrating that children are “silent spreaders” of COVID-19. It was

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Coronavirus: Ministers balance science and politics in latest rules

Boris Johnson arriving back at Downing StreetImage copyright
PA Media

It’s not a day for optimists, even though the prime minister himself is one of that tribe.

Tomorrow, it will be six months exactly since he told the nation to stay at home.

This time, Boris Johnson stopped well short of slamming the country’s doors shut.

But what really stood out in his long statement in a miserable-looking Commons was his message that the limits put in place today will last another six months.

  • New rules at-a-glance: More face coverings and fines
  • ‘We’ve reached a perilous turning point’ – PM

Even if you are very fond of your own company, lucky enough to have a secure job you enjoy and a comfy spare room where you can do it, it is quite something to contemplate.

The government now expects that all our lives will be subject to restrictions of one kind or another for a whole

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Society for Science & the Public President & CEO and Publisher, Science News, Receives 2020 National Science Board Public Service Award

WASHINGTON, Sept. 22, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The Society for Science & the Public today announced that the National Science Board (NSB), the governing body of the National Science Foundation, has awarded Maya Ajmera with the 2020 Public Service Award. Ajmera is President and CEO of the Society for Science & the Public and Publisher of Science News.

NSB is recognizing Ajmera for “inspiring generations of young people to be science and technology leaders and innovators through the Society for Science & the Public, a non-profit organization best known for its world class science research competitions, award winning science journalism, and expansive outreach and equity programs.”

The Public Service Award is presented to individuals and groups each year that have contributed substantially to increasing public understanding of science and engineering.

Ajmera has helped to transform the nearly 100-year-old Society, strengthening the Society’s science research competitions. She spearheaded

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Science News from around the World

Hi, I’m Scott Hershberger, with Scientific American as an American Association for the Advancement of Science Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellow. And here’s a short piece from the September 2020 issue of the magazine, in the section called Advances: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Science, Technology and Medicine. The article is titled “Quick Hits,” and it’s a rundown of some stories from around the globe.

From Argentina:

The earliest dinosaurs laid soft-shelled eggs, paleontologists say. A new chemical analysis of a more than 200-million-year-old fossilized egg from Patagonia—and a clutch of more recent eggs from Mongolia, found in the Gobi Desert—revealed a thin film matching the characteristics of modern soft-shelled eggs.

From England:

Archaeologists found that 20 deep shafts, previously thought to be natural sinkholes and ponds, were dug by Neolithic humans. The shafts form a circle two kilometers in diameter, with the Durrington Walls monument at

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The Next Administration Must Get Science and Technology Policy Right

As wildfires ravage the west coast, the COVID-19 pandemic continues to exact a toll on the nation as its citizens grapple with the economic fallout and businesses face uncertainty. The country is bracing itself for an even greater host of challenges in the coming months: the onset of the seasonal flu, uncertainty around the availability of a COVID-19 vaccine, underdeveloped telehealth systems, navigating the challenges of online learning and remote work that requires access to a strong digital infrastructure and broadband. These challenges underscore the urgent need for renewed investment in the science and technology enterprise and the rapid application of new scientific knowledge and advanced technology to solve complex problems.

One thing is clear: the next presidential administration must renew its commitment to investing in science and technology regardless of who wins in November. We write as a group of leaders from across science, technology and innovation who have

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House Science Bills on Space Weather and Election Technology Pass the House

House Science Bills on Space Weather and Election Technology Pass the House

Press Release
From: House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020

House Science, Space, and Technology Committee Ranking Member Frank Lucas praised the passage of two bipartisan Committee bills today on space weather and election technology. 

S.881, the Promoting Research and Observations of Space Weather to Improve the Forecasting of Tomorrow Act, more commonly referred to as the PROSWIFT Act, improves our ability to monitor and forecast space weather. Space weather is generated by magnetic activity on the Sun and can affect technologies on Earth ranging from cell phone communications to GPS navigation to the electric grid. The bill includes an amendment by Lucas to create a pilot program that will ensure that emerging private sector companies have a seat at the table and will be able to provide monitoring and forecast data which
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Signant Health Launches New eCOA Master Class Web Series Taught by Clinical Research Science and Technology Experts

PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 21, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Signant Health today introduced “eCOA Explained,” a new Master Class web series designed to elevate the understanding and skills of clinical operations professionals interested in electronic clinical outcome assessments (eCOA).

The educational and complimentary class launches with three courses and 16 on-demand lessons designed for all levels of eCOA experience, as taught by 13 clinical research science and technology experts. To enroll and start learning, visit www.ecoaexplained.com. 

Lessons available now include:

Build Your eCOA Solution

  • eCOA 101: The Basics (Jill Platko, PhD)
  • How to Build an eDiary: What’s Involved (Brandy Morneau)
  • From Paper to ePRO Measures: Licensing, Migration and Translation (Alex Kalpadakis-Smith, PhD)
  • How to Make Translations Work for Everyone (Adina Tapalaga)
  • To BYOD or Not to BYOD? (Bill Byrom, PhD)
  • Complex Diaries: Best Practices and Considerations (Jill Platko, PhD)

Ensure Successful Operations

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