Alligator inhales helium in the name of science [Video]

This is what an alligator on helium sounds like

Scientists had the reptile inhale the air

as part of an experiment

to understand how they communicate

The outcome?

Something between a grunt and a belch

(SOUNDBITE) (English) TECUMSEH FITCH, CO-AUTHOR OF STUDY “A CHINESE ALLIGATOR IN HELIOX: FORMANT FREQUENCIES IN A CROCODILIAN,” SAYING:

“Our question was whether alligators have vocal tract resonances like human speech. The key is that sound travels faster in helium. This makes the air passages seem shorter, making the resonances higher. So, if you breathe helium and the frequencies shift upward, that shows that they’re resonances. The hard part is getting an alligator to breathe helium.”

Source: Journal of Experimental Biology

Alligator ‘bellows’ are well known

but the function of their vocalizations remains unclear

(SOUNDBITE) (English) STEPHAN REBER, CO-AUTHOR OF STUDY “A CHINESE ALLIGATOR IN HELIOX: FORMANT FREQUENCIES IN A CROCODILIAN”, SAYING:

(REBER INHALES HELIUM) “Our

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Mars hires former IFT chief science and technology officer as new head of R&D

Most recently, Dr. Velissariou served as the chief science and technology officer at the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), where she oversaw science, technology, and policy strategies, advocated for the science of food, and partnered with stakeholders across industry, academia, government, and non-profits to advance the food system.

Prior to her role at IFT, Dr. Velissariou served in global corporate roles including VP nutrition R&D at PepsiCo, and various R&D positions at Kraft Foods in their coffee, refreshment beverages, cheese and dairy, and ingredient research segments.

“With global population growth and increase of supply chain complexities, I’m motivated by the legacy of resource, reach, and commitment of Mars to make a meaningful impact on the food industry,” ​said Dr. Velissariou.

Dr. Velissariou will report into Jean-Christophe Flatin, president of innovation, science, technology at Mars Edge (a business within Mars founded in 2017 focused on health and wellness through targeted nutrition) 

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Brain Mapping Foundation tackles COVID-19 pandemic through science, technology, innovation, and policy endorsing California Proposition 14-2020

Proposition 14-2020 provides $5.5B in total to continue stem cell research including $1.5B for the support of research and development of treatments toward neurological disorders.

LOS ANGELES, Sept. 16, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Brain Mapping Foundation (BMF) and Society for Brain Mapping and Therapeutics (SBMT) have been on the forefront of combatting COVID-19 with their enormous network of scientists, physicians, and engineers worldwide.  BMF and SBMT formed a COVID-19 global taskforce in February of 2020 and by the first week of March they were connected to 5 different global taskforces in Asia, South America, North America, Middle East and India in real time. “Our taskforce coordinated efforts with our global membership and collaborators to rapidly advance our understanding of COVID-19,” said Vicky Yamamoto, Ph.D., Executive Director of SBMT, Co-Chair of COVID-19 Taskforce and Cancer Scientist, USC-Keck School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery

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BlackRock Science And Technology Trust: A Growth And Dividend Magnet (NYSE:BST)

The following immortal Neil deGrasse Tyson quote just about sums up my view on the high-quality BlackRock Science and Technology Trust (BST):

Innovations in science and technology are the engines of the 21st-century economy; if you care about the wealth and health of your nation tomorrow, then you’d better rethink how you allocate taxes to fund science. The federal budget needs to recognize this.”

Even before the impact of the pandemic was known, science and technology stocks were outperforming the broader market. Science and technology will also lead us in the post-COVID-19 age. I’m sure many will agree.

01BST.jpg

Source: Twitter (@LeadLagReport)

The sector was doing very well before the pandemic and is expected to do better in its aftermath. So, yeah, I’m very bullish on BST for the long term, both as a dividend play and growth play. BST invests in current leaders and emerging winners in the field

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Johnson & Johnson Seeks Female Researchers Working in Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., Sept. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Johnson & Johnson today announced that it is accepting applications for its 2021 Women in STEM2D (WiSTEM2D) Scholars Award, aimed at supporting assistant or associate academic professors in the disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design. For three years, each recipient will receive mentorship from leaders at Johnson & Johnson and a total $150,000 ($50,000 each year). The deadline for applications is Oct. 15, 2020 at 9 a.m. HST, and guidelines and additional details are available here: https://www.jnj.com/wistem2d-university-scholars.

Launched in June 2017, the Johnson & Johnson WiSTEM2D Scholars Award aspires to fuel development of female STEM2D leaders, and inspire career paths in STEM2D, by supporting the research of the awarded women in their respective STEM2D fields.

Dr. Naama Geva-Zatorsky, one of the 2019 winners of the Johnson & Johnson WiSTEM2D Scholars Award, along with her team of researchers at

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‘Junk Science’ and Roundup Verdicts Examined in the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons

‘Junk Science’ and Roundup Verdicts Examined in the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons

PR Newswire

TUCSON, Ariz., Sept. 21, 2020

TUCSON, Ariz., Sept. 21, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — San Francisco juries have awarded up to $1 billion to persons claiming their cancer resulted from exposure to glyphosate, the active ingredient in the weedkiller Roundup™. In the fall issue of the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons, Paul Driessen, J.D., examines the evidence and the legal process in this case study of litigation that is destroying companies and technology.

(PRNewsfoto/Association of American Physici)
(PRNewsfoto/Association of American Physici)

Law firms are still soliciting clients for lawsuits in which cumulative awards could reach trillions of dollars, Driessen writes.

Introduced in 1974, glyphosate is the world’s most widely used herbicide, he notes. Millions of homeowners, gardeners, and farmers use it regularly to kill weeds. Countless farmers employ it with “Roundup-Ready” corn, soybeans, cotton, and

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Govt committed to promote science and technology for progress in country: PM

Prime Minister Imran Khan says the government is committed to promote science and technology for progress in the country.

He was addressing the inaugural ceremony of Pak-Austria Fachhochschule Institute of Applied Sciences and Technology in Haripur today (Thursday).

The institute will offer courses in artificial intelligence, engineering, food technology and various other disciplines.

The Prime Minister said we are moving in the right direction with a focus on education, science, technology and knowledge economy.

He expressed the confidence that the institute will prove to be a major step in promotion of science and technology in the country.

Imran Khan said the government is going to collaborate with five Chinese and three Austrian universities for technological advancement in Pakistan.

He said in the second phase of CPEC, special economic zones will be established and industry will be relocated in Pakistan.

Earlier, Prime Minister Imran Khan inaugurated Pak-Austria Fachhochschule Institute of Applied

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Here’s what science says about airborne transmission of the coronavirus

When the CDC updated its website on Friday to acknowledge that airborne transmission of the coronavirus beyond six feet may play a role in the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly indoors, the update was hailed by infectious disease experts interviewed by ABC News as an overdue step.



a sign on the side of a building: FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020, file photo, people sit at tables at San Diego State University in San Diego.


© Gregory Bull/AP
FILE – In this Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020, file photo, people sit at tables at San Diego State University in San Diego.

But on Monday morning, the agency took down that language, saying it was posted in “error.” Despite the CDC guidance whiplash, experts say it’s time to recognize that airborne transmission beyond six feet is possible — while continuing to emphasize that close contact within six feet is still the main way the virus is transmitted.

MORE: CDC abruptly removes new guidance on coronavirus airborne transmission

Scientists maintain that close, person-to-person contact is a main driver of the virus’ spread. This

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Speaking up for Science | UDaily

In a lecture quite literally ripped from the headlines, including those he wrote himself, H. Holden Thorp, the affable editor-in-chief of the influential Science family of journals, on Wednesday, Sept. 16, called on his colleagues in research to spend much more time at the intersection of science and public policy.

Thorp, who has been a chemist, inventor, educator, entrepreneur and college administrator, delivered his call during the University of Delaware’s 2020 Edward G. Jefferson Life Sciences Lecture. The Jefferson Lecture has brought multiple Nobel Prize winners and pioneering researchers to UD’s campus in its six-year run.

Because of the coronavirus pandemic, this year’s lecture — “Scientific Publishing in the Age of COVID” — was delivered virtually, from an upstairs room in Thorp’s Florida home to more than 250 listeners on UD’s Zoom and livestream channels.

Despite the unusual delivery, Thorp’s message couldn’t have been more timely, arriving as it did

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New technology is a ‘science multiplier’ for astronomy

New technology is a "science multiplier" for astronomy
The first image of a black hole by the the Event Horizon Telescope in 2019 was enabled in part b support for the NSF’s Advanced Technologies and Instrumentation program. Credit: NASA

Federal funding of new technology is crucial for astronomy, according to results of a study released Sept. 21 in the Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments and Systems.


The study tracked the long-term impact of early seed funding obtained from the National Science Foundation. Many of the key advances in astronomy over the past three decades benefited directly or indirectly from this early seed funding.

Over the past 30 years, the NSF Advanced Technologies and Instrumentation program has supported astronomers to develop new ways to study the universe. Such devices may include cameras or other instruments as well as innovations in telescope design. The study traced the origins of some workhorse technologies in use today back to their humble

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