2020 World Young Scientist Summit to Open in Wenzhou, China

2020 World Young Scientist Summit (http://www.wyss.org.cn) will be held in Wenzhou City of Zhejiang Province in Eastern China with the aim of gathering talents from around the world to create a better future. Leading Chinese and international scientists will communicate opinions both offline and online on innovation-related topics.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201014005518/en/

Beidou Information Industry Base. (Photo: Business Wire)

With the theme of “The future of technology depends on the youth,” this year’s Summit has a vision to fuel the development of the community of shared future for mankind. A series of “cross-border integration” special activities will be held that focus on UN Sustainable Development Goals for 2030, the Belt and Road Initiative, the integrated development of the Yangtze River Delta, the fight against the pandemic, and youth and the future.

Moreover, the Summit will gather young talents from various industries, venture

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Scientist gains fresh insight into the origins of earthquakes

earthquak
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Sometimes barely noticeable, and at other times devasting, earthquakes are a major geological phenomenon which provide a stark reminder that our planet is constantly evolving. Scientists have made significant progress in understanding these events over the past 50 years thanks to sensors set up around the world. And while we know that earthquakes are caused by shifts in tectonic plates, a lot remains to be learned about how and why they occur.


Passelègue, a scientist at ENAC’s Laboratory of Experimental Rock Mechanics (LEMR), has been studying the dynamics of faults—or the areas between tectonic plates, where most earthquakes occur—for the past ten years. He recently made a breakthrough in understanding the rupture mechanisms that eventually lead to seismic shifts along fault lines. His findings were published in the prestigious Nature Communications on 12 October 2020.

“We know that rupture speeds can vary from a few millimeters

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Annabelle Southcoat, Government Scientist, On The Positive Power Of Champions In The Workplace

In honor of #WorldMentalHealthDay I’d like to share with a story from another inspirational woman in my network. Annabelle Southcoat is a genuine polymath – someone whose intellectual curiosity and drive for humanity and social justice has led her down so many fruitful paths already. Her story is interesting because she so nearly wasn’t. Her story is relevant to business leaders because she demonstrates the value of authentic adjustments to our inclusion practice and how, with the right champion, we can change the course and direction of lives. Ms Southcoat is now a Psychologist at the UK Defence, Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) a drummer in a band, an innovative thinker and a pussy cat mother.

The Significance Of Childhood Narratives

In Ms Southcoat’s own words. ”I’m also a dyslexic, gay, trans woman (though I tend to just say woman these days) and

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Alec Baldwin Backs New Invisismart Mask, Cutting Edge Technology, Endorsed By Clinical Test And Scientist That Kills 99.99% Of SARS CoV-2 Germs

During a Pandemic it is important to STAY SAFE and be able to LIVE LIFE. InvisiSmart is an engineered next-generation solution that kills 99.99% of SARS CoV-2 germs. It provides your loved ones, people, healthcare professionals, athletes and businesses with long-lasting invisible protection.

InvisiSmart technology is verified by robust laboratory and clinical evidence, and comes as a Mask, Shield Spray, Seat Covers, and Sanitizer. It is important to note that InvisiSmart is a long lasting product that doesn’t use carcinogens.

INVISISMART Technologies has been proven to destroy the COVID-19 spike virus by the University of Cambridge. “We found that the products are active and effectively inhibited infection by an enveloped VIRUS-bearing SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein on its surface, with a viral core and genome based on lentivirus”, said Ravindra K. Gupta, Professor of Clinical Microbiology, University of Cambridge, UK.

Most recently, the explosive White House Coronavirus Outbreak brought

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Tech Moves: Airbnb HR leader joins Convoy; OutSystems hires Microsoft vets; Highspot’s new chief scientist; and more

Sunita Solao. (Convoy Photo)

—Digital freight startup Convoy announced Sunita Solao, previously an HR leader at Airbnb, as vice president of people and a new member of the company’s executive team.

“Finding the right leader for our People function has been my top focus,” said Convoy CEO Dan Lewis in a statement. “The world is changing and a new normal is emerging for how we do our best work. I look forward to partnering with a creative force like Sunita to take the best of what we know, and build for the future during this unprecedented time.”

Solao was previously head of people and talent for Airbnb’s Homes Business team. She held prior HR leadership roles at eBay, Magento and GE Healthcare.

“I recognized in my first conversation with Dan that the Convoy team was as passionate about shaping a high-performing culture based on values as I am, which was

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Scientist maps CO2 emissions for entire US to improve environmental policymaking — ScienceDaily

With intense wildfires in the western U.S. and frequent, intense hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico, the nation is again affected by extreme weather-related events resulting from climate change. In response, cities, states and regions across the country are developing policies to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases, chiefly carbon dioxide (CO2). Even though many state and local governments are committed to these goals, however, the emissions data they have to work with is often too general and too expensive to provide a useful baseline and target the most effective policy.

Professor Kevin Gurney of Northern Arizona University’s School of Informatics, Computing, and Cyber Systems today published results in the Journal of Geophysical Research detailing greenhouse gas emissions across the entire U.S. landscape at high space- and time-resolution with details on economic sector, fuel and combustion process.

Gurney, who specializes in atmospheric science, ecology and public policy, has

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Wild Chickens Rule the Streets in Some Beach Towns. Here’s Why One Scientist Is Studying Them

This article appeared in the November 2020 issue of Discover magazine as “Where the Wild Things Crow.” Subscribe for more stories like these.


If you’ve ever hit the beaches of Key West, Bermuda or Hawaii looking for a tranquil vacation, you may have experienced a rude awakening. By a rooster, that is.

These tourist-laden seaside towns are full of feral chickens. They roam the graveyards. They strut the beaches. They peck at leftovers beneath busy tables on restaurant patios. Legends about the birds abound, including that one flock arrived on the wings of a Pan Am jet and that some were bred to have extra toes. But are they good for anything besides waking us up?

Eben Gering thinks so. He’s been chasing free-roaming fowl around beaches across the globe for almost a decade. An assistant professor of biology at Nova Southeastern University in south Florida, Gering is convinced that

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Russian scientist detained for allegedly passing technology to China – reports

MOSCOW (Reuters) – A Russian scientist has been detained in Siberia for allegedly passing technology to China, Russian media reported on Thursday.

Alexander Lukanin, a 64-year-old scientist from the Siberian city of Tomsk, was detained on Tuesday after returning from China were he had been working at a local university, according to MBKh Media, a news outlet founded by Kremlin critic Mikhail Khodorkovsky.

Lukanin’s apartment was also raided by the FSB security service, MBKh Media reported, citing one of the scientist’s friends.

A message sent by Reuters on Thursday to Lukanin’s email address went unanswered. There was no immediate comment from the Russian or Chinese authorities.

Under Russian law, illegally transferring technology to a foreign country can lead to up to three years in prison.

Interfax news agency quoted a source as saying Lukanin had been detained for allegedly passing technology to China but that he was not being accused

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Russian scientist detained for allegedly passing technology to China: reports

MOSCOW (Reuters) – A Russian scientist has been detained in Siberia for allegedly passing technology to China, Russian media reported on Thursday.

Alexander Lukanin, a 64-year-old scientist from the Siberian city of Tomsk, was detained on Tuesday after returning from China were he had been working at a local university, according to MBKh Media, a news outlet founded by Kremlin critic Mikhail Khodorkovsky.

Lukanin’s apartment was also raided by the FSB security service, MBKh Media reported, citing one of the scientist’s friends.

A message sent by Reuters on Thursday to Lukanin’s email address went unanswered. There was no immediate comment from the Russian or Chinese authorities.

Under Russian law, illegally transferring technology to a foreign country can lead to up to three years in prison.

Interfax news agency quoted a source as saying Lukanin had been detained for allegedly passing technology to China but that he was not being accused

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