The Note: Biden sees masks as symbol and substance in drawing contrast with Trump

The TAKE with Rick Klein

Trump wore a mask Monday in leaving Walter Reed for the White House — but it didn’t stay on long. By the end of another extraordinary night, with an infected president urging people not to let COVID-19 “dominate” their lives, it may as well have never been on.

Former Vice President Joe Biden is calling that out, as he pleads for science over showmanship with a month to go before Election Day.

“Anybody who contracts the virus by essentially saying masks don’t matter, social distancing doesn’t matter, I think is responsible for what happens to them,” Biden said in Monday night’s NBC town hall. “What is this macho thing — ‘I’m not going to wear a mask?’ What’s the deal here? Big deal!”

PHOTO: Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks during a campaign stop at Jose Marti Gym in Miami, Oct. 5, 2020.

Democratic

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NASA’s Hubble Telescope sees huge exploding star disappear into the void

Titanic, runaway thermonuclear explosion. A disappearing act. Nature’s atomic bomb. NASA sure knows how to describe a supernova, the final moments of a star’s existence.



a star filled sky: Hubble observed a supernova on the outer edge of spiral galaxy NGC 2525. NASA, ESA, and A. Riess (STScI/JHU) and the SH0ES team Acknowledgment: M. Zamani (ESA/Hubble)


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Hubble observed a supernova on the outer edge of spiral galaxy NGC 2525. NASA, ESA, and A. Riess (STScI/JHU) and the SH0ES team Acknowledgment: M. Zamani (ESA/Hubble)

Seventy-million light-years away in the scenic spiral galaxy NGC 2525, a white dwarf exploded and the Hubble Space Telescope witnessed its last days. NASA and the European Space Agency, which jointly run Hubble, released a rare time-lapse of the supernova’s fading brightness. 

The space telescope first started watching the supernova, named SN 2018gv, in February 2018. The time-lapse covers almost a year of Hubble observations.

The supernova initially outshone the other stars in its host galaxy. “When a star unleashes as much energy in a matter of days as our sun does in several

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Amazon sees broad audience for its palm recognition tech

SEATTLE (AP) — Amazon has introduced new palm recognition technology in a pair of Seattle stores and sees a broader potential audience in stadiums, offices and other gated or secured locations.

Customers at the stores near Amazon’s campus in Washington can flash a palm for entry into secured areas and buy goods.

The company chose palm recognition, according to Dilip Kumar, vice president of Physical Retail & Technology, because it’s more private than other biometric technology, and a person would be required to purposefully flash a palm at the Amazon One device to engage.

“And it’s contactless, which we think customers will appreciate, especially in current times,” Kumar wrote in a blog post Tuesday.


Like the human fingerprint, every palm is unique. Unlike fingerprints, the palm is not used for broader identification purposes because more body specific information is needed. Any palm image proffered for use is never stored on

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Amazon sees its palm recognition tech in stadiums, offices

Amazon is introducing new palm recognition technology in a pair of Seattle stores and sees broader uses in places like stadiums and offices

SEATTLE — Amazon has introduced new palm recognition technology in a pair of Seattle stores and sees broader uses in places like stadiums and offices.

“And it’s contactless, which we think customers will appreciate, especially in current times,” Kumar wrote in a blog post Tuesday.

The company expects

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Private equity manager sees automation as future of energy industry

For art, I recommend Blowout Texas Oil Boom dated October 11 2018 on Merlin

Cutline:

Pumping units operate northeast of Kermit in this 2018 file photo.

A new transformation appears to be underway in the nation’s energy industry.

“There’s something happening right now I think is a really big deal,” said Chuck Yates, former managing partner at Kayne Anderson during the weekly Oilfield Strong webinar presented by OTA Compression, OTA Environmental, Kimark and the Permian Basin Petroleum Association.

“We are transitioning from the age of the driller, where we were providing marginal barrels of oil to the world from U.S. shale and, boom, COVID-19 took 15 million barrels offline. I don’t know if oil demand is growing right now (but) it will be gross domestic product-driven given the fact OPEC can turn on 10 million barrels tomorrow of they want. Even if we grow oil demand 1 (million) to 1.5

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